"Wie zit er in de regering van de nieuwe premier?"

Translation:Who is in the government of the new prime minister?

3 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/tomlingner
tomlingner
  • 25
  • 17
  • 11
  • 10
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1128

It seems that "Who sits in the government" should also be accepted, as it is often used in English, and seems to be an exact parallel to the Dutch.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SrMarien
SrMarien
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 4

That's a nice coincidence! Dutch uses 'zitten' a lot, when other languages would use 'to be' so I guess the developers didn't even think about 'to sit' in English... Normally it is always wrong :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schiffmeister
schiffmeister
  • 18
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 7
  • 5
  • 2

What is "er" doing here? It doesn't have to be here, does it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
Mod
  • 25
  • 20
  • 18
  • 17
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 6

We put 'er' in lots and lots of places! Annoying, huh? This sentence is fine without 'er', too. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schiffmeister
schiffmeister
  • 18
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 7
  • 5
  • 2

Thanks! Is it equally as acceptable/beautiful without it? Or would you have put it in without thinking about it? I will research "er", but if you know of any main rules, I would love to have some ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
Mod
  • 25
  • 20
  • 18
  • 17
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 6

I think (but that's without good arguments xD) that it's prettier with er.

As for tips, I bet you already have read the tips and notes. It will tell you the basic rules. I've also found two more sites: this one and this one (dutch)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schiffmeister
schiffmeister
  • 18
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 7
  • 5
  • 2

Bedankt!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 179

I agree with xMerrie, it's prettier with er, I guess native speakers will almost always include it in sentences like this. I guess this goes for questions about more than one undefined person:

  • Wie gaat er mee? = Who is coming along?
  • Wie zit er in de commissie? = Who is in the committee?
  • Wie houdt er van fietsen? = Who likes biking?

If there is a defined group, to choose from, er seems to be less necessary, in the next sentences it's optional to include it:

  • Wie van jullie houdt (er) van fietsen? = Which of you likes biking?
  • Welke ministers gaan (er) naar Brussel? = Which ministers go to Brussels?
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SrMarien
SrMarien
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 4

A native dutch speaker would always include 'er' in a sentence like this, it sounds better.

@susande Wow, I never thought it like that. I think you're totally right!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schiffmeister
schiffmeister
  • 18
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 7
  • 5
  • 2

Thanks, Susande!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

Are all sentences with er (necessary for unspecified subject) also okay without er?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
Mod
  • 25
  • 20
  • 18
  • 17
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 6

If I understand you correctly, then, no, because 'er' becomes the subject. Unless, the subject is known, then you don't add 'er' at all. With the exception when it is used as a 'voorlopig onderwerp' (I don't know the English translation, sorry).

  • Willem slaat Jan. (Subject = Willem, no 'er' added)
  • Jan is door Willem geslagen. (Subject = Jan, no 'er' added)
  • Er wordt gelachen. (Subject = 'er', you need 'er')
  • Er staat een paard in de gang. (Subject = 'een paard', you don't need 'er', but you have to reconstruct the sentence without 'er')
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mathso2
Mathso2
  • 25
  • 24
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

When I put "premier" as the answer, it said that "prime minister" would be another correct solution. Is it just a thing of Dutch to have the same words for these two things or is it unique to Australia that premiers ≠ prime ministers?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Meghan879357

I have a similar question. We have provincial premiers in Canada that head their own governments (but are not prime ministers - so Australia is not alone). Would we also use "premier" for them in Dutch, or is there another word?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mathso2
Mathso2
  • 25
  • 24
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Yes, I think these are the same things - premiers are heads of state parliaments here. At least I won't look like someone who speaks different English from everyone anymore :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adri_G

Apparently, in Europe, the head of the government can be called indistinctly Minister-president, prime minister or premier https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minister-president

1 year ago
Learn Dutch in just 5 minutes a day. For free.