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"Jag dricker kaffe."

Translation:I drink coffee.

3 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Fe2h2o
Fe2h2o
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I realise that context will probably tell which one is the correct word, but is there any difference in pronunciation between "jag" and "ja"? I haven't heard them side-by-side, but my memory from one sentence to the next tells me they sound the same.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jgierbo2
jgierbo2
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the a in jag is central, like in french avoir, the a in ja is velar or posterior, like in father

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fe2h2o
Fe2h2o
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Tack så mycket:-) I figured there should be a difference, but I wasn't hearing it...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jgierbo2
jgierbo2
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Varsågod

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Henni89
Henni89
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I'd say it might vary from dialect to dialect. As I pronunce it in daily speak, you couldn't tell the difference (but from the context)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xTheGingaNinja

Why is drink as a verb "dricker" but drink as a noun "dryck?" Shouldn't they have the same vowel?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jgierbo2
jgierbo2
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It's because drick is the second person imperative of dricka. In English, German, Dutch, ... vowel change in derivation is very common.

3 years ago