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"Mannen äter kött."

Translation:The man eats meat.

3 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/danielmonteiro16
danielmonteiro16
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K is pronounce like SH (or ch in German ‘ich’) before ö, y, i, e, ä

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebecca942716

The Swedish SH sound never sounds like the german CH in "ich". In fact, swedes can't even pronounce the german CH sound. If you say "kött", you say it in the front of your mouth with kind of rounded lips. You pronounce it like the english word "short" or the german SCH in SCHeiße.

The german sound CH is pronounced in the middle of your mouth (hold your tongue up towards the roof of your mouth) with a slight widening of your lips (Try making a soundless giggling, some people find that helpful)

I'd know since I'm half German/half swedish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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That's not quite true. The soft German ch sound does occur in Swedish occasionally. For instance, the classic way of teaching it to children is to ask them to say Jag bor i Kina, which causes the same sound (a voiceless palatal fricative). Pressing the tip of the tongue against the front lower teeth helps.

But obviously you're correct otherwise - as an approximation, it's not bad, but it's not the exact truth. The German sound is the [ç], while Swedish uses [ɕ] in Sweden and [t͡ɕ] in Finland. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebecca942716

@devalanteriel I've never heard a swede being able to pronounce the german "ch" sound, like in the word "lächeln" for instance. I've asked loads of people, they all have trouble. It's not occurring in the Swedish language. I've even got that sound in my last name, nobody can pronounce it. Sure people can obviously learn to pronounce it if they really try.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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I've heard plenty who can. Sure, there are more who can't, but it's not that hard to learn.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebecca942716

I forgot to say that I meant the sound CH in the word "ich". There are other words with CH, like "ach" in german that sound completely different.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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Actually kött isn't pronounced with the same sound as 'short' – the English sound is [ʃ] while kött has a [ɕ]. At least in the standard versions of the languages.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebecca942716

@arnauti Well if you're going to learn they sound similar enough. If somebody's a newbie at this language it's nice to get some pointers on how to pronounce. Ok, so try the word "shame" then. That may sound more like the Swedish "sh" in "kött".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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If you think [ʃ] and [ɕ] are close enough, you might just as well think [ɕ] and [ç] are close enough too. I get that you're trying to be helpful, but if you're trying to correct what other users claim, you really need to try to have your facts straight.

If anyone who reads this thread wonders what [ɕ] actually sounds like, there's an excellent video by blehg here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtpbB5-kA_0
There's a list of resources like that here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/5892805, we try to link people to topics covered in them when applicable.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OwainLlyfr
OwainLlyfr
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The pronounciations of the k in "kött" vary a lot between the Swedish regions. Along the west coast the k would sound exactly like the English sh in 'shot', while it would sould like the English ch in 'chip' on the island of Öland in the southeast. There are other regional pronounciations as well that I can't explain, but if you want to make it simple just use the English sh from 'shot' as we're over 2 million Swedes pronouncing it that way.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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@OwainLlyfr: That pronunciation is pretty much restricted to mid-east Småland and Öland. What Arnauti writes is correct for virtually the entire country. The tje-ljud pronunciation does not "vary a lot between the Swedish regions", and the "sh" in "shot" is only a half-decent approximation, not the same sound.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OwainLlyfr
OwainLlyfr
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I've finally been able to watch the youtube clip linked by Arnauti, and since I can't reply to Devalanteriels comment on my post I'll simply add that I (as a native Swede living on the west coast) obviously can't speak my own native language as I've never used the sound explained nor put the tip of my tongue in the position showed when saying the sound explained. The sound explained is standard in the area around Stockholm (the man saying the Swedish words also say them with a Stockholm accent) and the area around the lakes Mälaren and Hjälmaren with fingers stretching out a bit northward and eastward, but if you can't make it sound exactly right there are other ways of pronouncing it. I've never looked for youtube clips of Swedish pronounciations before, but having run a quick search right now I notice that NONE of the clips seem to be from the west coast. I wonder if it would be interesting to hear what the sounds are in that region (many will differ quite a bit from the way they're pronounced in the clips). I've never tried doing anything like this before though...

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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I am also a native living on the west coast and I disagree with you. It's standard Swedish, not Stockholm Swedish... but even if it was Stockholm Swedish, that makes a lot more sense than teaching incorrect pronuncation and trying to pass it off as dialect.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rosa256718

in every word they have the same rule ????

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Basically, yeah, but with a few loanword exceptions.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marvincorea
marvincorea
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is "kött" pronounced like shirt in English, but with a very soft r?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jungla3
Jungla3
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If you remove the 'r', then yes ^^

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marvincorea
marvincorea
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Thanks! That's what I thought it sounded like...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GiladFex

what's the difference between nötkött and knöt?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jungla3
Jungla3
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Nötkött = Beef

Kött = Any type of meat

3 years ago