Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"De soldaat draagt een groene broek."

Translation:The soldier is wearing green pants.

3 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/olive.winner

Is "een" strictly necessary here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raconteur
raconteur
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 3

because pants in dutch, unlike english, is singular. you can't say "he is wearing shirt", you have to to say "he is wearing a shirt". same thing here, and this should help you remember

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marijn.

Yes, it is :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AsmaaMagdi

I'm glad that 'broek' is singular in Dutch. It never made since to me that the word 'pants' is plural in English. It represents a single entity and should be used as such.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 93

The same goes for glasses (bril), police (politie), team (team, ploeg): singular in Dutch (plural when there are more entities), plural in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AsmaaMagdi

And scissors (schaar) :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/p8c
p8c
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 5
  • 6

ah, but for glasses, remember in the old movies where someone has just one? i think maybe "glasses" really is short for "a pair of glasses" as in one for each eye. but i see your point.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CreatorTae
CreatorTae
  • 15
  • 13
  • 7
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Actually, team is also singular in English. A pants, a glasses, a police, or a scissors don't make sense to English speakers, but a team does.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 93

Ah ok, however. Collective nouns like company names, "team", "police" are usually accompanied by a singular verb congjugation in American English (the police is) and plural in British English (the police are).

Regarding groups of people (e.g. the police): these are usually singular in American English (the police is) and plural in British English (the police are).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cpecue

Professionals who work in the clothing industry do have the singular of "pants" and they usually say, "I am designing a pant"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dkpwatson

If you use "pants" as a singular noun, in the UK at least, you'll be expressing disdain: e.g. That meal was pants!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/81cheney
81cheney
  • 17
  • 13
  • 8
  • 6

I think it's supposed to mean two pant-legs.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/luisgvior
luisgvior
  • 20
  • 15
  • 15
  • 15
  • 15
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 7
  • 7
  • 40

Why my answer: The soldier wears a green pants , has not been accepted?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrandmasterMG

Because pants is plural in English.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vikramdivy

Can this not be translated as "The soldier wears a green pant" ? I got an error for this

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LianeBond

A pant isn't really a thing...it's a pair of pants (American, I think) or a pair of trousers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vikramdivy

Aaahhh...got it..thanks..

2 years ago