"Har du tid en minut?"

Translation:Do you have a minute?

November 19, 2014

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AlexanderV206707

...to talk about our lord and savior Duo?

October 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Lozitano

Hahaha that's amazing!

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/skullcap

What role does 'tid' play in this sentence?

November 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Lundgren8

”Ha tid” it’s the same as English ”to have time” as in ”Do you have time to look at it?” except that you include it when you specify the unit of time as well so it literally means ”do you have time (for) a minute”.

November 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/HoroTanuki

similar to English: "Can I have a minute of your time?"

December 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/JeremyWils3

As a native English speaker and TEFL teacher I don't think "Do you have time for a minute?" is a meaningful English sentence. "Can I have a minute of your time?" is meaningful.

January 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaminegg

Perhaps, although I'm a native, American-English speaker, my language studies have made me too flexible in some ways. I think both of these are meaningful. The second, "Can I have a minute of your time?" is much clearer and preferred. The former, however, is intelligible and sensible. I'd probably hyphenate it thus: "Do you have time — for a minute?" The grammar doesn't quite mesh, making it sound as if the last clause is separate, an afterthought, but still perfectly sensible in context.

February 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Stallya

Isn't it "do you have a minute's time? "

March 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JaneJustice

I agree, being a teacher myself.

June 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/blauerKobold

What, then, does "Har du en minut?" mean, if anything? I am going to suspect that 'ha tid' or 'har tid' (in this case) is going to be a construct that has to be remembered when asking about having a time quantity. Yes?

October 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Sorry about the late answer. You can skip tid but it's more idiomatic to keep it. We also often use this kind of sentence without specifying the amount of time, just saying Har du tid?
You could also say Har du en minut över? – closest translation might be 'Do you have a minute to spare?'

December 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/historicbruno

Can you also say, "Har du tid en sekund?"

November 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Sure. :)

November 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/KatherineMaas

Why is this wrong? "do you have a minute of time"

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Added that now. :)

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ZhangtheGreat

Why did the "correct" answer I get say "Do you have time for one minute"?

July 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Well, it's also an accepted answer, though not the default.

November 10, 2018
Learn Swedish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.