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  5. "Vems bok är det?"

"Vems bok är det?"

Translation:Whose book is it?

November 20, 2014

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lostdrewid

Would "whose book is this?" be another correct translation? I'm still not sure what all the differences between den and det are, and if there's a separate word for this and that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

We don't accept this in contexts like this one. this ought to be denna/detta or den här/det här. So Whose book is this? would be Vems bok är det här? in Swedish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattheworb

I think det and den refer specifically to "it" and "that", whereas "this" is more of an ownership, referencey subject thing. I could be wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gersois

"This" would generally be used for a proximate object e.g. a book being held. The sample sentence does not give any context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Yes, that's right. det/den här (+ denna/detta) means this and is used for objects that are close, den/det där means that and is used for objects that are farther away. In some contexts, den/det function as that too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fatjoe987

Why isn't this "vems bok är den" if it is referring back to an -en word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Swedish sentences must have a subject, and that's what "det" is doing here. It's the same kind of "det" that you'll find in "det regnar" (it rains), not meaning very much but still needed. So it's not actually referring bak to "bok", it's just hanging around.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/helloelly123

Think about the declarative version of this question = "Det är (someone)s bok." and when you ask a question, like in English, you move that part to the front = "(Someone)s bok är det?" replacing the blank with the question word "vems". (And of course the verb är has to be in 2nd position, like in other Germanic languages, so you move it accordingly.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonsieurCal

Is there a correct way of showing realization like 'ah' or 'oh!' ,in Swedish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Well, "ah" or "åh" work fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aniklol

Why is the det pronounced as duh instead of deea?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/w0nika

I came to read the answer to this. ..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garth188776

I wouldn't mind one myself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlisterEP

I would like to know also.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4070milesapart

I have Swedes correct me when I don't pronounce the t in "det" like the program does here. Is this a regional pronunciation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

The T is silent. Claiming elsewise is hypercorrection.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GlitterNinja101

Why can't all of the other questions be as easy to figure out as this one?!?! These questions will be the death of me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lady_Buckthorn

I'm curious about the shades of meaning, here. This question could be an inquiry about the ownership of the book... but could someone also use this wording to be asking who the author is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

No, it's not used that way in Swedish. (Though I have heard it from immigrants, so I guess there is a similar construction in some languages).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaneV88

It pronounced "det" as rhyming with English "met" (for example) but before this always heard "dee". Is it pronounced differently in this sentence (or in questions in general?) or is it a tts problem?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaneV88

Det sounded like "dur" in this tts


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaneV88

At least in the fast one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BakaNin-Nin

Why is the det pronounced like dé and not di?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Howtomakestuff

I don't know if its where I live, but we spell "Whose" like "Who's". I have never seen it spelled like this before.

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