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"Ella me ha obligado a hablar."

Translation:She has forced me to talk.

5 years ago

98 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/scott2907

He must be married.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bal7774

Why is there a before Hablar? I didn't see that question answered.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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It's more that the "a" is after "obligado".

Some Spanish verbs are followed by specific prepositions. For me, it's useful to remember the verb plus the preposition together, "obligar a". (As if I can actually remember them all, but I try.)

Here's a useful list. although it would be nice if it was all on one page: http://www.elearnspanishlanguage.com/grammar/verb/verbswithprep.html

Here's another useful list that has them all on one page, but it doesn't have obligar ... http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/courses/VRBSPREP.HTM

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Falling_Up_3

So..... Are all verbs followed by something? Is there a rule for this?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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No, some verbs stand by themselves. I don't think there's any rule, it's just something we have to learn on a case by case basis.

English is the same. For example, "call", "call on" and "call for" all mean something different.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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There is a slight difference. In Spanish these verb preposition combinations are followed by an infinitive. In English they are followed by the direct object or DO pronoun. These can be separatable or inseparatable verbs. (Turn in my homework or Turn my homework in)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sir_Carl
Sir_Carl
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Anyone else think this sentence is strange?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/faith46
faith46
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No, it is standard soap opera stuff :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manuelsg02

Don't forget telenovelas on Univisión! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dunk999
dunk999
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A police interrogation. A movie with a blackmail story. A war movie. Not very strange. Unless you mean that it doesn't make sense in Spanish, then I wouldn't know, but it seems correct to me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Egdir
Egdir
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Actually, I happen to find this useful in Colombia...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SageTX

:)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/E.T.s_Son
E.T.s_Son
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Strange in what sense?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZampanosGlasses

I pictured it as fake humility at a company dinner with speeches ... CEO of the company (who, by the way, doesn't actually do anything) is expected to make a speech, but feigns ignorance when called upon ("No, no! Come on!" [waving arms and making cutthroat hand signal]) then walks up to the podium and delivers a perfectly executed, jargon-filled, soul-bereft and obviously rehearsed speech.

"Well, since 'She has forced me to talk' ..."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mawileboy
mawileboy
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Man, this sentence is pretty hard for me to say. "ha", "obligado", "a", and "hablar" all start with the same vowel sound. Dang!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Steradian

Not 100% sure, but I think Spanish speakers would elide these vowel sounds somewhat in speech, so it'd be hard to hear the presence of "ha" and "a". We do it all the time in English without realising, because our brains are so used to the patterns sentences tend to follow that we can easily hear where words are supposed to be for a fragment of speech to make sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jetze92

This is also my biggest hurdle with Spanish. With the 'h' it's just one long a. And without a lot of knowledge of sentences in Spanish it can be really hard to comprehend what is being said.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PurpleDiva1

Try to think of it like a song. If you listen to the melody in wich a sentence like this is spoken, or to the way the volume of the voice goes up and down; you will usually hear that either the pitch, the volume, or both changes slightly as one vowel glides into the other. I also struggle a bit with the same issue as you, but I've found this approach to be very helpful. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinCo

No and yes. ha and obligado - two different vowel sounds. There is no chance of them combining into one sound

"a" and "hablar" - the same sound (of course the h is silent) and it is combined in normal speed speech to sound like just the word hablar.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pharmakon

I'm pretty sure that making ha and obligado begin with the same sound is a stereotypical gringo accent/mistake.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Sí, definitivamente.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabeMonson

I agree! I've also realised that for me using Duolingo can too easily turn into a 'race though it' game so I've been making myself say sentences, substitute other vocab etc. Good luck with ha.. ha.. a... hablar

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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"She was obligated (or forced) to talk to me. "How do we know if "me" is an indirect or a direct object? DL did not accept my sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janpot
Janpot
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Obligar is "to force" so when it is "me ... obligado" you know it was I who had to do something The "ha" gives away that it is he/she/it that forced me.

If I forced her to speak to me it would be "le he obligado a hablar conmigo"

If she forced herself to speak to me it would be "se ha obligado a hablar conmigo"

If her friend forced her it would be "le ha obligado..."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

Thank you! But I'm still a little fuzzy on some details. I translated it "She was required to talk to me." Since "me" can be either direct or indirect, how do you know this is not right? I see that conmigo could be used, but why not an indirect object for "to me?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

Okay, yes, I see that. I guess what I was thinking of was not ""she was required" but "she required" which is awkward. You would probably use a different verb, like demanded.

But if you WERE using a verb that worked nicely either way, say Pedir, for instance... Ella me ha pedido hablar. How do you know whether that is She has asked me to talk OR She has asked to talk to me?

Do you see what I'm asking?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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For "she has asked me to talk", I think it would be "Ella me ha pedido que yo hable" (with "que" and the subjunctive).

And for "she has asked to talk to me", I think it would be "Ella ha pedido hablar conmigo".

I know that doesn't answer your real question, since pedir was just an example. But maybe there isn't any verb that would work nicely either way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janpot
Janpot
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The same way as in English. "She has required" ... = "... ha obligado ..." "She WAS required" = " ... estuvo obligada .." (or "... se vio obligada .. ")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Just guessing, but I think "She was obligated to talk" would be "Ella fue obligado a hablar".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janpot
Janpot
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correct, but *obligadA, she's a girl =)

or "era obligada" "estaba obligada" "estuvo obligada" depending on the situation. (or possible even subj! damn they have a lot of verb forms in Spanish.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Jan, No, the verb form does not change for gender. The obligado used there was the past form, used with an auxiliary verb to make it a participle.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

BarbaraMorris, what about PRESENT Participle using is obligated? I thought of it as ETIQUETTE requiring someone to speak, for societal politeness, so I said, "She is required to speak to me (or she would be acting rudely)." Seems like all the examples using "was required" would be past participle, but I haven't studied that yet. Comment?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"Ella me ha obligado" is about her requiring me to speak, not about her being required to speak to me.

As to using the present participle "is obligated", that would be "I am obliged/required by her to speak". I suppose that is similar to "She has obliged/required me to speak", but I won't expect Duolingo to accept it.

"She is required to speak to me" would be something like "Ella necesita hablar conmigo". A completely different idea.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Let me begin by saying I'm not arguing at all that you're WRONG, just that I do not understand why it cannot mean what I said, IF one uses "is required" instead of "has required," which might have been used, in context. If she is required to do something, or if she has required someone else to do something are totally different connotations, which I cannot yet tell how to discern! Very confusing,

I do not understand (linguistically)why "is required" isn't a perfectly good form of Present Participle, since it is an auxiliary "to be" verb paired with a Preterite verb form. Your example changing it to first person would be the same - I AM required, you ARE required, he, she, it IS required. I read your discussion above with "Homefire," & saw at first he used a Past Participle, but was having similar confusion. So many exercises seem to put "me" in there & translate it as a prepositional phrase "to me" used as an IO (if one was diagramming the sentence), so my example "She is required to speak to me (by etiquette, in polite society)," seemed reasonable. (Conversely, etiquette would also dictate, for example, that "The Queen is not required to speak to me (or even make eye contact - HA!)." In your first-person example, you added "by her," & of course, the "by" was not in there, just as my addition of "to" was not in there. But prepositions are understood in sentences like "Before the children would go to sleep, their father was asked to read (to) them a story." I think I may understand this in about 10 years. Maybe.<sub>sigh</sub>

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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The reason your translation "She is required to speak to me" isn't because of the verb form or the choice of prepositions.

It's because you have it backwards. The Spanish sentence means that she is requiring me to speak.

The "by her" was implied in the Spanish sentence because "she" is the subject of the sentence. "She has required me" is equivalent in meaning to "I am required by her".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dare3966
Dare3966
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Not direct nor indirect, its a foreign object.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vandermonde

I think there would need to be a "se" or something in your version. Even if "me" is an indirect object, there has to be a direct object (in your example it's her) that would need to show up in the spanish sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stevebungay

It's a word order thing. Disregard the 'Ella', that's just there to to clarify who the 'ha' refers to (could be he/she/it). You are then left with a more simple sentence, and the indirect object ALWAYS comes first. I say this with more authority than I actually have and hope that if I'm wrong, a more advanced student will correct me. Hope this helps.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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But indirect objects come before verbs too. I now undertand why I was wrong a year ago. It has to do with the verb translation: HA must be translated as HAS (not as WAS). That makes it a verb which needs (in Spanish & English) a direct object.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I'm pretty sure that it's because obligar needs a direct object, so if there's only one object, it has to be the direct object.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Correcto

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarrenEsch
WarrenEsch
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Definitely not spoken by Chuck Norris. No-one forces Chuck Norris to do anything.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rockyc138

She obviously waterboarded him

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheStatelessMan

Perhaps it is a US-English tendency, but I have a strong preference against obligated. Elsewhere in the Anglosphere, we use obliged: "She obliged me to talk."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hjh788272

I am working in UK-English and also strongly disliked "obligated" but eventually yielded by using "forced" or "compelled" instead. I am not saying that "obligated" is wrong but I would always prefer "obliged" but DL will not accept that.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DOOMSTAR12

Must be interrogation!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterBushn1

Interrogation I presume

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael330443

What is wrong with 'compelled'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheAwesomeClair

I'm a SHEILD agent, that's what I do.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

*SHIELD

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheAwesomeClair

....right. Thank you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Machupichoo

To force is "forzar" in the dictionaries I use. The word "obligar" in the spanish dictionary gives meanings in this order: 1) to obligate, bind 2) to force or compel. Duoligo hover tip is "bound" and even though it sounded strange I used it; I also tried obligated, but DL only likes forced. I don't get it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ngarrang
ngarrang
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Would "obligated" have worked here, as well? I didn't try it, for fear that DL would bite me for using a common sense translation. She has obligated me to speak, while formal sounding, is correct English. It may have a better subcontext, as 'forcing' someone could imply a threat, whereas obligating someone is committing them without their approval.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
Telisa7
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It worked for me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MobyN

I translated it as 'she has bound me to speak' and I think that should be accepted - its a bit quaint but still carries the same meaning? I will report it and see what happens.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Machupichoo

My complaint is that the hover tip offers three translations: bound, undertaken, and required, so I chose bound, even though I would have used obligated, which is the first suggestion in my Spanish-English reference dictionary. The word "forced" which was DLs anwer was the second suggestion and sounded odd to me. I thought the meaning was more along the lines that I was one of a group of people who were supposed to speak, but I was shy and she gave me a bit of a shove (strong verbal encouragement) but didn't put a gun to my head. I will "force" myself to accept DLs answer I guess.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cmuny15

I feel the same way! "Forced" was the last word I was thinking of. I was going to go with obligated but after looking at DL's OWN tips I chose bound, which is still weird, just to be wrong! Frustrating.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Burak.Sahin1

my answer was "she has obligated me to speak" and it was wrong. why?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cihtgolf

Creo que esto tiene que ser el subjuntivo, verdad?
"Ella ha obligado que yo hable"

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Interesting perspective.

As a native English speaker, I see this as a simple case of the indicative - a statement of fact. However, I'm slowly coming around to an appreciation for the use of the subjunctive mood in Spanish. I think your construction is different, but may actually be a common way to express the same idea in Spanish. Even so, I would not go so far as to say that Duo's sentence is not correct Spanish or that this idea requires the subjunctive.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Larsstberg

"She has obliged me to talk" was marked wrong. I wonder why...

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RandySmith13

I tried "She has obliged me to speak" and was also marked wrong: I disagree!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephenBartlett

I wrote "She has me obligated to talk" and missed it. I am not sure why I missed it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"She has me obligated to talk" is present tense, meaning something like "she has got me into a position where I am obligated to talk".

"She has obligated me to talk" is past tense, meaning that at some time in the past she has made me talk.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soreIIina
soreIIina
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Bound???

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gallom
gallom
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How can you differentiate between this translation and "she has been obligated to talk to me" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Search for "talk to me" in this discussion.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerryMacki1

Humm, is not obligated a better and more natural translation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lmanni

What is with all the negative comments about women?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/12345679u
12345679u
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Gasps Shocking...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HeatherWym

There are so many rude sentences in Duolingo.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/onamor2000

What is wrong with "She has made me speak"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rockyc138

Obviously she is with Homeland Security

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mars7017
mars7017
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As a native English speaker, the English translation sounds just as good omitting the word 'has' , i.e. she forced me vs she has forced me. Being in the past participle lesson made me choose to include it. I can't remember if this subtly changes the meaning of the sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doysl

Ella no tiene sentimientos...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cncshnd

Does this not translate to "She has me obligated to talk?" as well?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bigwig40
Bigwig40Plus
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why won't compelled be correct?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arriell101
Arriell101
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Can anyone tell me how I know the 'me' in this sentence is a direct object and not an indirect one? My first instinct was 'She has been obligated to talk to me.'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"She has been obligated" would be "Ella ha sido obligada", and "obligada" would be an adjective. Even if it were "he" and not "her", it would be "Él ha sido obligado", but "obligado" would still be an adjective. Since it's "Ella ha obligado", (She has obligated), the "obligado" is a past participle, and she was the one doing the obligating. Since the verb needs a direct object, the "me" has to be that direct object.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ciredier1

"She has been obligated to speak to me." .... why isn't this a possible answer? Doesn't it mean, "She has been forced to talk to me."?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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No, it doesn't mean "she has been forced". The subject and verb are "Ella ha obligado", "She has forced". The object is me, "she has forced me".

"She has been forced to talk to me" is "Ella ha sido obligada a hablar conmigo".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tamaldutta1957

Why not, "She made me to speak". It means the same and is normally used.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"She made me to speak" sounds odd to me. Maybe it's a regional thing. I would say "She made me speak".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PacoStewart1

What is the difference between: "She has forced me to talk." and "She has made me to talk." ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eyefidelity

Why was “obligated” marked wrong?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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"she has obligated me to speak" - not accepted 2 Mar 2018. Reported.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cat687566

I said "I have been obligated to talk to her"--aside from correct answer choices available within the computer database, wouldnt this translarion be accepted in person?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

No, that would be a misunderstanding of the speaker's intent.

Note that the subject of the sentence is ella not yo. That means "she" is the one who has done something. And at the other end, there's nothing in the original sentence that would imply "to her." Instead, there's me (ella me ha....), which can only be the object of the verb obligar. Hopefully, that will help you piece together the rest.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/James30032

Necesita un abagado?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/James30032

A la policia?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keystonep

Why not "She has obligated me to speak."

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snoblitt

She has obligated me to talk. Is also correct.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M0RM0N

Corruption

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blairparki

Can it not be " she has obliged me to speak"???

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulGreen471373

Why not obliged rather than forced since being obliged is a kind of force?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesdawso567889

obligado =/= obliged?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susan208302

In my answer - the post said obligated me to talk Sorry this is poor English grammar- I am English and we would never say this

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tom735525

She has obliged me to speak is another way of saying she forced me to speak why is it wrong

2 weeks ago