"Ho poco tempo."

Translation:I have little time.

July 3, 2013

18 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trohlck

una domanda - in english there is a difference in meaning between "i have a little time" and "i have little time" both are accepted as correct translations here. how might one make the distinction in italian between "little" and "a little" ? i noticed this also with "few" and "a few" or do we just need to guess from context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/giuliap

In my opinion "little/few = poco", "a little/ a few = un po' ".

I would say "I have little time = ho poco tempo", and "I have a little time = ho un po' di tempo". Also, "I have few apples = ho poche mele", "I have a few apples = ho un po' di mele".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m1y5Z

What is the difference between "I have little time" and "I have a little time" or between "I have few apples" and "I have a few apples". In Polish google translates the same ;/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

I'm fairly sure that I tried 'I have a little time' the first time I did this one and got told the 'a' was wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alciebell

"I have a little time" was marked incorrect today. I can see why; it means something very different from "I have little time".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

Yes, it just rejected "...a little time"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miraclepoet

Oct 2018 "a little time is not accepted". In English a little time, means that I do have some to give to you. But "little time" means don't bother me, I'm too busy...at least in the US


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coledanielj

In italian "a" little time requires "un". Without un it is simply "little time".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Milaena

I wrote "I don't have much time" and it wasn't accepted...I guess I wasn't literal enough


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

I'll admit that sometimes Duo's expectations are a little "off side". In this case they are teaching three / four words: "I have" "little" and "time." There's no negative. Teaching languages requires imparting certain basic facts (words/syntax) into the learner. Your interpretation has basically the same meaning but it doesn't use the requisite vocab. for this lesson. Take pity on the poor robot with its limited vocabulary. ;-) Ciao, best wishes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyP11

I have yet to meet an English language teacher that would use the word Got in this context. Avere = to have, not to have got


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

It is idiomatic English to use "have got" and "have" when speaking of possessions. For example: I have got five bottles of maple syrup, I have five bottles of maple syrup, or I possess five bottles of maple syrup. The same meaning is conveyed by any of these sentences.

I can also imagine using "have got" for emphasis: I have got a little time reserved for you. In this sentence, using "have got" could be stressing that I especially reserved the time or that I always have time for you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tcheou83

Why "I have few time" is not accepted ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/giuliap

Because few can only be used with plural "countable" nouns. Time is uncountable so "little" has to be used. I am not a native English speaker though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duoitaliano9

Native English speaker here - This is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tcheou83

Merci pour la précision !! Bonne journée !! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brownin329

"I have got?" Why not "I have a little time?"

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