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"Dygnets timmar."

Translation:The hours of the day.

3 years ago

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DehPuh
DehPuh
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can someone clarify "dygnets"? why not "dagens"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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"Ett dygn" is 24 hours. As far as I know, there is no English counterpart to this word. In Swedish, "ett dygn" consists of day and night, so "dagen" does not have 24 hours, unless of course you're experiencing midnight sun. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DehPuh
DehPuh
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oooooh I get it! -- it's like the italian "dì" (day + night) and "giorno" (only the lighty part)! although no-one uses "dì" anymore, we always say "giorno"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
amuzulo
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In case you're curious, French has this distinction too:

dag = journée
dygn = jour

Oops, looks like I got them mixed up, so I just corrected them above. Thanks to spiffwalker for the correction!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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similar to polish: dag = dzien, dygn = doba

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
amuzulo
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I'm actually learning Polish now, so this is awesome, thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spiffwalker
spiffwalker
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This is actually backwards.

Dag = journée (not full 24 hours, daylight only)
Dygn = jour (full 24 hours)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelKop11

But in French it is less of a day versus night (or 12 vs. 24h) thing. Journée refers more to the time span of a day, whereas jour is the day itself. For example, "Ça prend une journée" (it takes a day), "Un beau jour" (a beautiful day), but "On a passé une belle journée" (we've spent a beautiful day). There are similar pairs matin / matinée (morning) soir / soirée (evening) and also nuit / nuitée (night, but here nuitée is the price for a night in hotel).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DmitryReve
DmitryReve
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For reference, russian also has this: dag = день dygn = сутки

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stockholmer

merci c'est plus facile en français :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpinyNorman
SpinyNorman
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Hmm, I guess it's the same as ''vuorokausi'' in Finnish. Either 1) 24h period ''from midnight to midnight'' or 2) just a 24h hour period

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/finnplek
finnplekPlus
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In Dutch it's called an 'etmaal' - usually used instead of 'dag' if you want to be precise, e.g. instructions on how often to take medication.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/david.s.scholz

why "timmar" and not "timmarna"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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Things 'owned' by a noun in the genitive cannot be definite. It's the same in English: you can't say the day's the hours.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/david.s.scholz

Thanks. That makes sense. I got confused by the given translation "The hours of the day."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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"of the" is merely a form of expressing possesion in English. You can as well just say "The day's hours".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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Becasue "Dygnet" already translatest to "The day". No need to put "timme" in the definite form "timmarna", because this would mean "the hours". That way the sentence would translate to "The day's the hours".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jersebas
Jersebas
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Just curious.. wouldn't the definite form of 'timme' be 'timren'? According to tida.se 'timma' (timman - timmar - timmarna) and 'timme' (timmen - timmer - timren) are synonyms, so I'm not sure if it matters or not?!? (guess not ;-) but I was a bit confused by the different versions)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lundgren8
Lundgren8
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Timmer means timber, and timren is the plural definite of that word. It’s unrelated to timme meaning hour.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jersebas
Jersebas
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Ok thanks! Although I'm still a bit confused by this then (looks awfully the same to me): http://tyda.se/search/timme?lang=en=sv

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lundgren8
Lundgren8
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Yeah, that’s plain wrong. There’s no -r in that stem.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaMadd2
JoshuaMadd2
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Why do we need timmar here at all?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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Becasue "timmar" translates to "hours" and Dygnets "translates to "of the day".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahGraham25

Would "Timmarna av dagen" be an acceptable translation for "The hour's of the day"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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No, that doesn't work.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/signe346759

i get what dygnet is, but how do you translate it to proper english...

1 year ago