"Han tycker om glass."

Translation:He likes ice cream.

November 20, 2014

48 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SpookySkellyGurl

"Welcome to the Salty Spittoon, how tough are ya?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theredcebuano

How tough am I? I ate a bowl of milk for breakfast.

-

  • without any cereal

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RevonQilin

My feet have been stepped on by horse around 10 times


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dorthii

As a dane my first thought was why is chewing on glass? Then I remembered that the swedish tycker isn't the same as the danish tygger lol :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/this_is_Aryn

I am also studing Danish and thanks to you now I am going to confuse them


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vicinfinity

what is the difference between tycker om and gillar ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alfredos222

I speak Norwegian and the word "glass" still means glass in Norway, how is that possible???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gonzzi7

I think it's because the word in swedish comes from the word glace in french.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/senagurbuz

glas means glass, glass means ice cream ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spudmcloughlin

Better not mix the two up if you go to Sweden


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zesty_Crunch

Are you kidding me? The word for "ice cream" is "glass"? Oh, Swedish, how I love you. Better not get those mixed up...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jliusiwei

In French it's "glace," so it totally makes sense if you get over the spelling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zesty_Crunch

I'm not saying it doesn't make sense, I'm just saying it's hilarious.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nvrslps

Thanks for the context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/egyamado

Yes it is. Between 1950 and late 1970 in some countries in the Middle East, people would call Ice-cream "Glass" within their Arabic dialog.

English has so many words sounds/pronounced the same but spelled differently. https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20061205204541AANLUaN


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RogerioBL

I dont think so. Swedish has a lot north germanic influence. As know by you, ice in Deutsch is Eis and Glass is Glas.

Cause of this its not "totally makes sense".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Not sure I understand your comment, but glass in Swedish is a loan word from French glace. And glas shares a common origin with German Glas. So it does totally make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OwainLlyfr

As a matter of fact the Swedish word "glass" was pronounced "glass-e" (and probably still using the French spelling) until the end of the 1940s.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeroGoi

I thought the same thing. Oh man, this is going to be interesting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1eaper

Now I can tell everyone that I eat glass for dessert.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rfgiusti

Don't forget French people eat pain for breakfast


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bornna1

No, you can't tell everyone that you eat glass for dessert you must say "Jag äter glass"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OwainLlyfr

Just remember that the Swedish pronounciation uses a short 'a', or you will be saying that you eat glass (the only difference between the Swedish words 'glass' and 'glas' is the sound of the vowel). :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sara641491

What if we wanted to say: He thinks of ice cream?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OwainLlyfr

That would be "Han tänker på glass" on Swedish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S.M.94

glas takes ett what about glass ? takes en or ett ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LesMachotsOrs

What function does the om hold?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nemomeori

Isn't "Han tycker om glas" right? "glas(SV)" means "glass(EN)"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrykBurski

What is the difference in pronunciation between 'glass' and 'glas'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

In glass, the a is short and the s is long.
In glas, the a is long and the s is short.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kim197311

I sometimes eat ice cream in a glass. Glass i en glass?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Glass i ett glas. They're two different words, note the number of s:es.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kapaeth

i haven't understood "tycker om". Can anyone explain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/valerietheblonde

It would be better if ice cream were paired here, since glass is one word in Swedish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TamaraTodd1

Alright what throws me off is the "om"? anyone know how to explain this? Why not simply "Han tycker glass" where does this other added word come from. does it mean likes? instead of "like"... only the "Om" adds an "s"? as nice a learning tool this is...I find this problem often with Dulingo no really explaining things like this in languages you are very new to... very well if anyone gets me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OwainLlyfr

Swedish uses something called "löst sammansatta verb" (weakly connected verbs) that can consist of 1-3 words that sometimes stick together and sometines split. "Tycka om" is one of those, so the "om" is a part of the verb and not the same as the conjunction "om" (if) or the preposition "om" (around, about).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai32849

"om" in general hardly has any meaning, it means around, but if you put them together they mean "like" = "tycker om" "tycker" means think or opinion, that's why you can't say "han tycker glass" cus that would be "he thinks ice cream"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/inkyenki

I can't quite tell what's going on with the recording - is it a soft g or a y?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

The g in glass is a hard g.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie199723

Why isnt it "Han tycker glass"? What is the " om" there for?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Many Swedish verbs consist of more than one word. This is one. We use tycker om to mean "like", and if you remove either part the meaning is completely lost.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Comrade_rat

what's weird is that glass with 2 s is ice cream but glass with one s is glass.

Learn Swedish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.