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"Hvilken relation har du til din chef?"

Translation:Which relation do you have with your boss?

3 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Pleurocystites
Pleurocystites
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"Which relation do you have with your boss?" - Is this suppose to be asking about how you interact and feel about your boss, or is this asking how you are related to the boss? I don't know if BSE people don't have a problem, but the translation sounds weird to these ASE ears.

Is "Hvilken relation" a common construction to ask this type of question (which ever type that is)?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tddk
tddk
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"Hvilken relation har du til din chef?" asks about how you interact and feel about your boss, not whether the two of you are related. "Er du i familie med din chef" asks about whether this person is related to his/her boss.

Is "Hvilken relation" a common construction to ask this type of question (which ever type that is)? yes it is.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pleurocystites
Pleurocystites
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Thank you!

To the course moderators,

I would like to suggest that "What [type/kind] of relationship do you have with your boss?" would be a much more natural translation. "What relationship do you have with your boss?" also works.

I don't know if it might be different for BSE, but for ASE "What" would be the correct interrogative pronoun, not "which".

"Relations" is generally used for organizations (e.g. countries) or non-specific people (e.g. police and civilians). "Relations" is also a euphemism for sex which might also explain why it is generally not used as often for individual people, but it can be used (Skillfully!).

I have never seen the singular noun "relation" used to describe how specific people feel and interact with one another, though it is frequently used for objects and concepts. With individual people, "relation" is usually used when discussing similarity (e.g. "His son bears no relation to Steve's sister." or when talking about location ("I have no idea where I am in relation to you, the mall is too big!).

I respectfully submit that the suggested translation "Which relation do you have with your boss?" should be swapped for one of the previous suggestions (If it makes sense in BSE keep it, but as long as the new suggestions also work for BSE, perhaps make one of them the preferred translation).

-Tusind Tak

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kennethwidmer

I speak BSE, and I completely agree with you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey314556

Agreed for BSE

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Photoadventure

I agree!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blkx-Darkreaper

A better english translation would be "What kind of relationship do you have with your boss?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duKaren

I agree!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FyodorPavlovich
FyodorPavlovich
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If you don't mind, what are ASE and BSE? Google is no help; for some reason I only receive Danish results, for example for bovine spongiform encephalitis.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pleurocystites
Pleurocystites
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American Standard English and British Standard English

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FyodorPavlovich
FyodorPavlovich
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Selvfølgelig! Is there a CSE? Or are we just caught in the middle?

Edit: The letter E.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pleurocystites
Pleurocystites
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I've not seen CSE used.

Edit: changed from CSA- a typo

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WardJack

Excuse me! We're forgetting about OSE - oz standard english! some where between BSE and ASE. :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottHutch
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I don't see any particular reason that we couldn't establish that CSE exists. All three sources of modern spoken English in question (American, Canadian, and British) all use slightly different dialects.

And maybe this is just because I'm married to a (U.S.) Civil War history buff, but when I see CSA, I always think Confederate States of America first.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottHutch
ScottHutch
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Good point! Make that FOUR (and possibly counting!) sources of modern spoken English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rhhpk
rhhpk
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Just to add to all the other comments saying the same thing: "Which relation do you have with your boss?" is not standard English in any continent. It's also confusing, and I had to look on here to see whether it means "how are you related to your boss" or "what is your relationship with your boss".

From the helpful comments on here, it obviously means the latter, whereas the translation given would more likely suggest the former.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StewartMan

The answer given is incorrect english ( you've ).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xneb
Xneb
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There's nothing we can do about that right now. If the systems sees "you" and "have" next to each then it automatically contracts it. Very useful most of the time when it is correct, very annoying in cases like that

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ozwordnerd

"What sort of relationship do you have with your boss?" - should be accepted

1 year ago