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"J'en ai."

Translation:I have some.

5 years ago

94 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Wenxie

Why not "I have it," instead of "I have some?"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
ThanKwee
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I have it = Je l'ai

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fredua

Could you please explain this for me? If 'J'en veux' could be "I want it" or "I want some", why cant "J'en ai", also be like that? Thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
ThanKwee
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"I want it" is "Je le veux" or "Je la veux".

"J'en veux" just means "I want some". It does not mean "I want it".

en refers to quantity, an amount of something

Je veux des bananes = I want (some) bananas. = I want some = J'en veux.

Je veux le livre. = I want the book. = I want it. = Je le veux

I want the apple = Je veux la pomme. = I want it. = Je la veux

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fredua

Thanks. Then Duolingo got it wrong. When it asked 'J'en veux', I wrote 'I want it'; it marked it correct and provided 'I want some' as an alternative.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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@Fredua, ThanKwee and super_moi: I (native speaker) agree with you:
- J'en veux. = Je veux de [cela, la chose, ceci, la purée...]. <-> I want some.
- Je le/la veux. = Je veux [l'objet, la chaise, le prix, ...]. <-> I want it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/super_moi
super_moi
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It might be a mistake. I'm really struggling trying to figure out any situation where "J'en veux" could possibly mean "I want it". "I want some" or, in this case "I have some" is definitely by far the best translation and should be strongly favoured.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bata989
Bata989
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I used Duolingo on computer and in the lesson they literally said that en change any already presented subject with de... So, if this is answer on that type of question, that why it's incorrect "I want it"?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuanKruger

Thanyou very much Anijo, I understand now that en is used in case of quintities

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FAVSkillz

just say j'ai

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
ThanKwee
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J'ai just means "I have".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/naphira

Here are two good links on the uses of 'en': as an adverbial noun: http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/pron_adverbial_2.htm As a preposition: http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/preposition_en.htm

Hope that helps!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dohertys84

I think this question is confusing without a contextual sentence to come before it but I see that J'en ai would have to translate into 'I have some'.

If someone said do you need a pen... you could reply "J'en ai une" I have one or I have it meaning what ever you were talking about. I think it's ambiguous without knowing what it's replying to.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/17gmoore

Wouldn't J'en ai une mean "i have some a"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amir.pro
Amir.pro
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No, it means: I have one (of it).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/protocactus_PC

For anyone having trouble with these types of complex and ambiguous parts of the language, REDO THE LESSONS. I was having lots of problems before with possessives and plurals before, and also with questions, but all it took was 3-4 revisions of the section to grasp the concept of the subject. It may seem frustrating, but it should fix the problem for you in no time.

3 years ago

[deactivated user]

    I second this!

    Those were also the most frustrating lessons for me (along with this one!), but now I get it.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/CynLR

    If one is frustrated, you also might look to other ways to learn the language. There are so many sites on the net that are great aids. All you have to do is google 'explanation of french en' to get myriad sources. about.com is something I use a lot.. Also, go to Amazon and spring for a used french textbook. I bought a couple (yes a couple) for a few dollars each. Also, I recommend French for Dummies. They make it enjoyable to learn and there is one edition that has all six of the 'French for Dummies' volumes in one. Duo Lingo can't teach all the subtleties.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AwesomelyHumble

    Agreed. http://french.about.com/ has been immensely helpful.

    I'm also using https://lingvist.io/ (also a free app), and that has been a great learning companion (and the pronunciations are excellent).

    Another app I use is French Interactive Reader (on Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.languageguide.interactivereadings), and this is a very helpful resource to read stories with pronunciations and translations.

    Also, Linqapp and HelloTalk apps, and http://conversationexchange.com/ are great to communicate with native French speakers to practice.

    Many free tools are available to learn. Duolingo is awesome, but adding others will help your learning a lot.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Je810
    Je810
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    I literally can't understand this Robot chick like 60% of the time. Is it because I'm a newbie? Or is this just bananas?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Bob_Bowes

    At the start it is difficult to hear French until your skills improve. When I can’t understand duo it is normally because I haven’t learned to hear that particular word or phrase yet. Sometimes duo has technical sound problems and you should report those. At other times you can disagree with duo’s pronunciation and the discussion in the question normally evolves to cover that. Good luck

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/WillBigger

    No. She is horrible. I studied French for years and I am doing this as a refresher, and she is at times very hard to understand.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/saturnwings

    I'm also doing this as a refresher and have also noticed some moderate difficulty in understanding the robot. I think part of the issue is with us, though. Not being native, I think we're not used to all the nuances of pronunciation. Also, in a classroom setting, teachers enunciate and speak with much more clarity than the daily speaker,even if said teachers are native speakers.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/XieC2

    What? She's incredibly easy to understand 99.99% of tha time.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/GymFLD
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    I could not understand the robot voices on my cell phone at all. Using my laptop and a good quality headset has helped immensely.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/firesangel

    Me neither. And my co-worker, who's first language is French and she still uses it daily, can't understand her either! This one she just stared at it more lost than I was!

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/fredwsmith

    Ce sont des bananes. I am almost 8 months into this and am very frustrated too. Hang in there.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/nickelsmon

    Does the "en" stem from another word or is it kind of its own deal?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PzychoGamer
    PzychoGamer
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    It's its own deal.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Onoszko

    I've got some is not accepted?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/abrahamgon2

    I would have thought "I have some" would be "j'ai quequels". Is this just another way of saying the same thing, or am I completely off?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
    ThanKwee
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    Well, it's just that it's "quelques" and then it's transitive. "J'ai quelques livres" = I have some books.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/YahyaZuhair

    Wouldn't "j'ai des livres" be easier to say?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PzychoGamer
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    'en' is the pronoun of the article 'des'. When it says "J'en ai", it literally means "I of it have" = I have of it = I have some [of it].

    'des' is an article meaning an indefinite amount.

    To combine these two, "J'ai des livres. J'en ai trois."

    Literally, "I have some books. I of them have three."

    Normally, "I have some books. I have three [of them]."

    I hope this helps.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/YahyaZuhair

    I know, I was just saying it's easier to say "des livres" than "quelques livres".

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/jaxxel24

    It seems like it's the same as the difference between "I have books" and "I have some books". Am I wrong?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/YahyaZuhair

    @jaxxel24: "It seems like it's the same as the difference between..."

    yes, exactly.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/dan.bondarenko

    So the 'quelques' in "J'ai quelques livres" stands to stress the amount (some)?

    I'm still a bit confused as to in what situation I should prefer "J'ai des livres." or "J'ai quelques livres.".

    Can someone clarify please? XOXO :)

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Bob821435

    Thanks it helped

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/hannrkelley

    I hope someone answers this because that sounds plausible to me too!

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
    ThanKwee
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    Yes, "j'ai des livres" would be easier to say and is more common. I was just explaining to Abramangon why saying simply "j'ai queques" is wrong.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/bjorn22
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    Is it like in Italian? "Ne ho"?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/glorifai

    Why is j'en ai not also "I have them" can en not be them?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly199

    What is the difference between some and something in French?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Amir.pro
    Amir.pro
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    Some = en, des, du, de la (depending on the situation)

    Something = quelque chose

    J'en ai un peu dans mes​ poches. (I have some (of it) in my pockets)

    J'ai quelques chose dans mes​ poches. (I have something in my pocket)

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/RKSMT
    RKSMT
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    Is, Je ai en, wrong? If so, why. If not, why would I use one expression over the other?

    5 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/erudis
    erudis
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    "En" as a pronoun always comes before the verb. http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/pron_adverbial_2.htm

    5 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ParisianDreams

    What is the difference between en and de/des?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/YahyaZuhair

    They could be;

    • both en and de are prepositions that have many meanings depending on the context. Generally, in and of respectively.
    • de and des are partitive articles, meaning "some", and they need to be followed by a noun
    • en is a pronoun, means some, any or one depending on context. It refers to a previously-mentioned word or part of a sentence, and it usually replaces "de + noun" in that sentence.

    Please refer to this link for further info about en the pronoun

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/xbecenti15

    Here's a good example of the usage of 'de' and 'en. << Avez-vous des pommes ? >> = Do you have (some) apples? In response, this is where the 'en' comes in; because you are still talking about the subject of having apples.

    << Oui, j'en ai. >> = Yes, I have some. You could've said 'Oui, j'ai des pommes' to say 'Yes, I have some apples' but in order to not sound repititive, you would say the former sentence just like how you would say it in English. Since 'en' is an adverbial pronoun, it always comes before the verb that modifies it, which in this case 'ai'.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Frenchshikhi

    Really sounds like 'jamais'

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/nyharel
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    I heard "John ai" :-) Really, when you hear two syllables and it's really three whole words, it's frustrating... The "slow speak" button only made it harder to understand...

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/XieC2

    That's how it's pronounced though. Really it's no worse than the English single syllable "sceud" used to mean "It is good."

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Rickshao

    "en" means "some"?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/xbecenti15

    "En" is an adverbial pronoun replacing de + noun to avoid repitition, so yes you are correct. Note that because it is a pronoun, it goes before the verb that modifies it. "Avez-vous de l'argent ?" = Do you have some money? "Oui, j'en ai !" = Yes, I have some!

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/fredburma
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    This sounds exactly the same as 'janais'. If I am using the basic 'strengthen skill' button I have no idea what category I am in so I can't know what words to expect. There should be allowances for things like this.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/XieC2

    There is no such word in French as « janais » ; you are probably thinking of « jamais » , meaning "never" - which definitely sounds different from « J'en ai. » I know it seems difficult or impossible now, but it's just another one of the skills that must be learned on the way to speaking and hearing French. Best of luck.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/fredburma
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    But the difference here with the computerised voice is negligible. If it were a human it would be easier to grasp the context.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/XieC2

    Then don't learn to distinguish the difference; it's your choice.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/fredburma
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    No, I'm saying that the robotic voice they use makes it indistinguishable. As I said, a human speaker would be easier to understand.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/XieC2

    You're right, it's indistinguishable; the rest of us are just pretending.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/JaimeraisU

    so... Peux-j'en ai? is Can I have some?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/CaptainLatin

    That would be <<Puis-j'en avoir?>>. <<Je peux>> posed as a question becomes <<puis-je>> (it's irregular, I think). Also modal verbs (can, should, might, etc.) ALWAYS take an infinitive, so <<avoir>>, never <<ai>>.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Frank682031

    What is J'en mean?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/saturnwings

    It's just "je en" combined - "je en" sounds awkward, though, and we musn't have that in French. :) "En" just replaces "some" in this case and is meant to standard in for a quantity of something.
    Je - I en - some ai - have

    "En" is, I think, one of the more tricky grammar words since it can be both preposition and adverb, as well as being used in a variety of ways in both cases.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/HarshitGup18

    Why not use j'ai en?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/trover9
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    Why is "Jean ait" not acceptable? The pronunciation is exactly the same.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/whatever578

    Can "en" also mean "in"

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/gmjapan

    I used "j'en fait" as the answer for "i do something" and it marked correct. So when this "j'en ai" came up to translate to english, i answered "i have something" which was wrong and the correct answer as "i have some". Why is "en" allowed for do something but wrong for have something?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/dlfr
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    I'm similarly confused why it can't mean "I have one", given we don't know the context of the sentence. (I do understand why "I have it" would be incorrect.)

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ladymao
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    I also answered "I have one." Thinking about it, literally, "I have one" would be "J'en ai un/ J'en ai une," even if "I have one" would make sense in English in many contexts where one might answer "J'en ai."

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/deeptendu
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    In which specific situations en would mean some?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/xbecenti15

    If it is being used as a way that replaces a de + noun, for the sake of not being repetitive. Here's an example: "Avez-vous de l'argent ?" = Do you have some money? Now, in response. "Oui, j'en ai !" = Yes, I have some (money!) Note that "en" in this context functions as an adverbial pronoun, so it precedes the verb that modifies it.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/HelbentForleder

    How about: I have some of it?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Sarah617902

    It really bothers me when they want you to write something down from just listening to it. Especially when you havent seen it in the lesson

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Sarah617902

    Perhaps they did show it but it is hard to remember all these things

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/xbecenti15

    I'm not sure if you know this already, but if you go on the desktop version of Duolingo on every lesson there is a notes section below on the page about the lesson you clicked on. It tells you everything you need to know about the certain category of words you're learning such as usage and instances.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/VBafna

    Why not say "J'ai du ça?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/XieC2

    "I have it" is different from "I have some", so it is not the best translation.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/mohammed339347

    I think it also means "them" Is it not right?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Amir.pro
    Amir.pro
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    En means "them" as well, but in this question it would be: "Je les ai".

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ISureDidnt

    Why 'I am having some' is incorrect?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Amir.pro
    Amir.pro
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    Have with this concept (to own) is not normally used in continuous form in English.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ethan480289

    So does en = have? Because i thought en =in

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/robgo924
    robgo924
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    I dont understand the logic of this, as an English speaker

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Casey698621

    So do you say it a certain way like when you ask a question in English

    8 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/DaphneSpotted

    Can someone explain the "have"s?? There are so many ways to say "have" and I don't know when and where to use it, or which one

    8 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/TJTitmus

    Hopefully I have understood your question correctly - In my native UK English .... I have, You (singular) have, He/she/it has, We have, You (plural) have, They have. … however all of these english conjugations of 'To have' can have many different applications depending on context. This is a useful source of info for Italian 'haves' https://www.thoughtco.com/italian-verb-conjugations-avere-4093137
    I hope this helps you :-)

    3 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/JonBennington

    That female robot has got to go - I can never hear it clearly even at turtle speed she slurs her words

    4 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/JudithCassata
    JudithCassata
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    Am I the only one who cannot actually HEAR the subtle distinction in certain French phrases which make it SO difficult to translate during a listening exercise?

    4 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/your_mom.

    (word bank) i have some banana beer

    3 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Izzy308171

    I saw this used in one of the duolingo stories as 'J'en ai deux' 'I have two'. Is J'en used emphatically in this case?

    3 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Chris154288

    so why not 'I have one or them'

    3 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/lll87kolll
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    How about "I have it some." ?

    3 years ago