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  5. "Han äter sitt äpple."

"Han äter sitt äpple."

Translation:He eats his apple.

November 21, 2014

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mirnoje

Are "r s" pronounced like sh in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarcoisGlucklich

Really useful! Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David7697

Sin, sitt and sina are used to denote that the "thing" being talked about belongs to the subject.

Sin is used for common (en) words, sitt for neuter (ett) words and sina for plurals.

These are only used for pronouns in the third person.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cowcowcow8

Whats a neuter word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David7697

A neuter word is one that uses the word "ett" in singular indefinite form (Ett äpple). A common word is one that uses the word "en" in singular indefinite form (En klänning).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerAndereLerner

These are practically reflexive possessive pronouns used in the third person (singular and plural).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kusarigama8

Nahh sitt for ett ord sin for en ord And here it is ett äpple


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dzingel43

I don't understand this. What do you mean by ett and en? Do you just have to memorize what words are ett and en? And is it the noun that would be ett or en?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kyera2Toasty

So are "sitt" "sin" and "sina" gender neutral? Like they could be used to refer to a female or a male?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Yes, and also to groups. De äter sina äpplen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aniklol

Is "sitt" supposed to be pronounced "sheet"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Whenever R is followed by an S, it creates this so-called retroflex sound – even over word borders. (exceptions: when the R is dropped altogether or for speakers who don't have the standard Swedish R). So yes, the R in äter is supposed to merge with the S i sitt here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Natalie841407

Wow thank you. This was really confusing since it's not one word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/truewonderland

And what is it about "hans" and "hennes" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Those mean 'his' and 'hers' when things are not owned by the subject of the sentence. So if Han äter sitt äpple, the apple is his own, but Han äter hans äpple, the apple belongs to some other male.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueMoose1

Why can't it be 'he eats her apple'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David7697

If you use "sin, sitt, sina", you are referring back to the subject of the sentence (he).

Hon äter sitt äpple, for example, means "She eats her apple" (her own apple). It can never mean "She eats his apple" because that would imply "she" is a "he" at the same time. With current LGBTQ trends, maybe that sentence will be valid in the future. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueMoose1

So if you wanted to say 'he eats her apple' you would use 'hennes'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David7697

Han äter hennes äpple.

Yes, sir/ma'am!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueMoose1

Tack så mycket! :) (Have a lingot!) :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndersPecore

Can someone explain in detail what the difference is between Sitt and Sin? I cannot find a pattern.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Sin = singular en-words

Sitt = singular ett-words

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