"Lui dorme."

Translation:He sleeps.

November 21, 2014

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/a-muktar

Il leone dorme stanottteeeeeeeeeeee!

January 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/StanKing1

But I thought nessun dorma?

October 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Duolessio

That's actually imperative: nobody sleep!

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mprdo

There is wiggle room (liberty) in muic and poetry... and Duolingo "Italian" is the approved Tuscan dialect, not necessarily the daily vernacular. Even as Garibaldi said in the 1860s after unifying the multiple kingdoms, principalities and dukedoms... "Oggi facciamo italia, domani italiani." Today we make Italy, tomorrow (we make) Italians. And after over 150 years, the North, South and Sicily are still at odds, but united under the green, red and white. Da vero, nessun dorma anche oggi. 3Mar19

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo

*nessuno dorme

October 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/lupogrigio

what's wrong with "he's asleep?"

November 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo

That would be «Lui è addormentato.»

March 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/lupogrigio

literally true - however "he sleeps" is a bit stilted unless the question is something along the lines of "what does John do?" and the answer is "(that lazy so-and-so ...) he sleeps" - consider the questions "where's John?" or "what's John doing?" - "he's asleep" and "he's sleeping" would be more natural answers ... at least here in the northeastern US -

March 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo

Yes, I understand. I am from the same region of the US, but that is just the simplest way to translate it. Perhaps the question was "What does John do every weekend?" An appropriate answer to that would be "He sleeps." Since context is missing, one really cannot tell. I do understand from where you are coming though.

March 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Duolessio

Yeah, but this doesn't apply to Italian, since "lui dorme" can be also translated as "he's sleeping".

Besides, "lui è addoementato" is the literal translation of "he's asleep", but in Italian it's not said that way. You are more likely to find "addoementato" in "lui si è addoementato" = he fell asleep.

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Christine406282

He's asleep= Lui è addormentato. I think?

September 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/organist66

In UK English "he is asleep" is the natural and correct translation. "He is sleeping" would only be used if there were a particular reason, e.g. someone needing their sleep to recover from an operation or an accident. All a bit subtle for a computer.

September 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

In the US, I use both. Where is he? He is asleep.

What is he doing? He is sleeping.

October 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/frankmazuca

just thinking, if we were all sleeping, how could i say Noi dormiamo?

December 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/OldBen44

Why not 'asleep'?

February 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RishabhPal1

Lui dorme con i pesci

July 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/FelicityMc10

I wrote he sleeps!!!!!

November 30, 2017
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