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"En skjorta, flera skjortor"

Translation:One shirt, several shirts

0
3 years ago

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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I wish there was a lesson on pronunciation...

55
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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You can hopefully find some links here.

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tinyset
tinyset
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well according to the link you provide, DL pronounced it wrong here. It sounds like "hoo-ta" in stead of "shoo-ta".

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hobomonkey990

It's actually pronounced (in standard southern Swedish, at least) /x/. h/sh is just a approximation for English speakers because English doesn't have an equivalent sound. It's basically a Spanish j, where you take your tongue, put it into the "sh" position, but instead, moving your tongue up to the roof of your mouth and pushing air through the channel at the top of your tongue. But, most of those sounds are what is called "labialized," where basically you round your lips as you make the basic consonant, I hope that helps. :-)

11
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theredcebuano

In his description, he's right. And technically, he's still right as to what I'm going to correct him. Yes, the [x] sound is the standard in Southern Sweden HOWEVER, his description is the standard in Central Sweden which is the [ɧ] sound. The [x] sound is simple a Spanish j. But yeah, he's technically correct, for the most part.

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David7697

Thank you very much! I was trying to emulate the sound from different sources and instructions, but suggesting the Spanish "j" sound makes it much easier for me.

Can anyone confirm that this is, indeed, how the sound sounds?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hashmush
Hashmush
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It's common in southern Sweden and used a lot by immigrants. But the standard Swedish sound is different. Compare:

(You can find an example to the right)

I would use the Spanish j as a starting point and try to soften it so it doesn't sound as harsh.

2
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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I agree with Hashmush. The speaker in the video has a very pronounced accent in Swedish, I would assume that Spanish is his native language. Try to listen to someone whose native language is Swedish instead.

2
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hashmush
Hashmush
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Is pronunciation is actually quite off in that video. He only shows two of the possible versions of sj, but doesn't even mention the standard Swedish one.

I would not recommend watching his videos if it's pronunciation you're trying to learn.

1
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David7697

Thanks. I found a video that makes it clear, I think. It's like a Spanish "j" sound in "jinete" but I thought it sounded harsher, not the other way around.

This one (I think he refers to it as the southern sound): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehvUR2pCPms

0
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick
Yerrick
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I understand there are different dialects where each of these pronunciations is used.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hashmush
Hashmush
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Well, it sounds correct to me.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marPW
marPW
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Link does not work.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wurstobier

The comments section in the mobile apps is broken. "Hidden" links only work in a browser -- https://www.duolingo.com/comment/5892805

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AaronKoeni2

Tack

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vankata99

Thanks

0
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RogueTanuki

Should "a shirt, lots of shirts" be accepted?

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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No, flera doesn't mean many. To say "lots of shirts" you'd say "många skjortor".

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RogueTanuki

Flera doesn't mean many? But when I hover over the word, the translation says "many"? :/

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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Flera is more like "several". In it's very essence, it means "more than one".

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lizardbethh

So another close word would be "multiple"?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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Better, yes.

0
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WildSage
WildSage
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In 2.0 would there be room to add a little description somewhere of when to use flera vs. många vs några ?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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We'll try to make the distinction clearer there, yes.

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2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RogueTanuki

So, would it be like, "a few"?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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No, "några" is a better translation of "a few". :p

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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bluenosedfox

Is there a set rule into plural endings - ie, do ALL -a words become -or? Ankor, Myror, Skjorta, Strumpor?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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All en-words that end with an a become -or.

Note that it doesn't hold for ett-words, e.g ett öga - två ögon (one eye - two eyes).

You can find some rules here (in Swedish).

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAlberdi
RAlberdi
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Aha!

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wazamee

Its many shirts not more. More in swedish is "fler"

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mariatersa77
Mariatersa77
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The voice pronounces SK like F: is it correct??

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilsehallon

Why not a shirt, several shirts?

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mahara2015

So, 'One shirt, seven shirts' can't be accepted?

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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Seven :)? No, that's "sju".

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mahara2015

Oh, that makes sense.

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinchThing

In this sentence can "a" and "one" be used interchangeably?

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenryDART
HenryDART
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The pronunciation sounds really cool :D

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Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zaniarm

How would Swedes that live in Finland pronounce skjorta or skjortor?

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Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toomassusi

?????????????????!!!?????????????????

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Reply1 month ago