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  5. "Breakfast, lunch and dinner."

"Breakfast, lunch and dinner."

Translation:Bricfeasta, lón agus dinnéar.

November 22, 2014

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.o_

Does Irish use serial commas always, never, or does it differ throughout the population like in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Proper Irish puts an agus between every pair of items in a list, so no commas would be needed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.o_

Do people ever use commas there though?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Those who choose to use the English method of specifying lists in Irish follow English examples — some use a serial comma and some don’t.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ccmcloughlin

I wrote "lóin" instead of "lón" and got marked as incorrect - why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Lóin is the genitive form of lón, which isn’t needed in this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KateLorrin1

Is it okay if my fire won't let me use an accent???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Darth8863

I wonder if there are any less English-sounding equivalents for these words in Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CampNowhere

How do you know we didn't get these words from Irish? I don't think they appear at all in the Germanic and Italic languages I've studied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1358

Given that "breakfast" is the meal at which you "break a fast", it's a safe bet that Irish borrowed bricfeasta from English. "Dinner" is derived from the verb "dine", which itself derived from the Latin for to break your fast, and lunch devolved from nuncheon, a noon-time drink in Middle English.

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