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https://www.duolingo.com/wmunnell

"El papá tiene que despertar a los niños a las ocho de la mañana."

5 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Jem38
Jem38Plus
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i said the father has to wake the children at 8 in the morning, why is it wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iakobski

I agree, that is correct English, but perhaps a little old-fashioned.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeelOfShame
PeelOfShame
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How is it "old-fashioned"? It's still proper English.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stoneystone

Agreed. English is still English. I just got it wrong for writing that..

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexander.Braley

Welp one week later and I got it "wrong" for writing the same thing, I'll report it too.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arturohiero

Father = padre, dad = papa.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

Absolutely correct. I've reported it, so hopefully they'll fix it soon. Generally I only include the optional "up" when referring to myself. E.g. "I wake up, and then I go and wake my daughter for school".

On an interesting side note...

In English and in Spanish, you can wake yourself up. "I wake up" = "me despierto", and you can also wake someone else. E.g. "I wake him" = "Lo despierto".

In English you can sleep. "I sleep" = "Duermo", but you cannot "sleep" someone else "I sleep him" just makes no sense. However in Spanish you can use "dormir" in reference to someone else, and it means to put that person to sleep or to bed, as in a mother settling a child. E.g. "Lo duermo" = "I put him to sleep" / "I put him to bed".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wmunnell

In English we pretty much use "waken","awaken" and "wake" interchangeably, though "wake up" seems our most common usage. In regard to your side note: "sleep" is intransitive, i.e. it cannot take an object, so our construction is, instead, "put to sleep". The Spanish "dormir", on the other hand' may or may not take an object, as need dictates.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wmunnell

Just what is the difference between "wake up the children" and "wake the children up"?? I did not miss a word.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

One is in Duo's database of correct answers, and one is not.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris_Hayduk

Happened to me as well. I reported it is a problem. Hopefully they fix it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samantha.miller

That's really odd. Technically "wake up the children" should be correct and and "wake the children up" shouldn't be. It's fixed now though.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinCo

Not really. For a separable phrasal verb like "wake up", both "wake up the children" and "wake the children up" are correct. The tricky case for English learners is the usage with a pronoun. In this case, "wake him up" is correct, and "wake up him" is not an accepted usage.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wmunnell

Well, yes, apparently so. Perhaps they should expand their database a bit to allow for the flexibility of English.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babsblabs
babsblabs
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"Wake up the children" should be accepted. It need not be "wake the children up."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cookj

Why is "must" wake the children wrong, and "has to" wake the children correct?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

Duolingo is being a little picky. Strictly speaking "must" would be translated as "deber". I guess "must" (deber) is a slightly stronger term than "has to" (tener que), but there's really not much in it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

So it is not necessary to place an object pronoun in front of tiene in this sentence? Why not?

5 years ago