1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Swedish
  4. >
  5. "Varför gråter du?"

"Varför gråter du?"

Translation:Why are you crying?

November 22, 2014

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LolaValentine

I'd like to point out something that helped (at least for me) to remember this.

In old english, wherefore means why.

Var = where, för = fore.

If you think that varför is wherefore, and therefore: why, it becomes extremely easy to remember this one, plus, it also helps in remembering what var means.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phaenon

I thought of the same thing! "Wherefore art thou Romeo?" :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoroTanuki

A lot of people actually think that "wherefore" in this sentence means "where" XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReilleYosef

Why weepest thou? hehe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/javakaffe

when it is "are <verb> <pronoun>" does it become "are <pronoun> <verb>"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

I don't really understand your question. Swedish doesn't form sentences with "are verb pronoun" like English would.

Subject and verb switch places in questions, if that's what you mean.

hope that helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/javakaffe

Jag är ledsen att mina frågor inte vettigt, men tack!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/helloelly123

I know what you're asking. You're looking at the mouse-over translations and "gråtar" is "is/are crying. But it's only Modern English that makes questions by adding extra "unnecessary" words like "do" and "are" = "Do you cry?" "Are you crying?" etc. But most other European languages do not have these extra words. It's just "Du gråtar" (You cry/are crying) and "Gråtar du?" (Do/are you crying?).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vanessachanice

am i the onling one hearing "geroter"??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

It sounds OK to me...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joycemelton

worse than that; what i'm hearing is geddawatah


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thatguy94

For word order does it go question word, person being asked, topic of qeustion?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Generally speaking, it goes [question word] [head verb] [some possible adverbs] [subject].


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustEnoughDucks

Are du and ni interchangeable in this case? I though we used ni in the same sentence earlier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

It's du if you're talking to one person and ni if they're multiple people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewDelg15

Would this literally translate to, "what-for crying you?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

In a sense, though "wherefore cry you?" is a closer literal translation. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/portu-maskon

The sentece is Varför gråter du

I,m like it means why cying you but really its why are you crying

Can someone explain to me why some swendish sentences are like this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Different languages have different grammar. English can use either the "why are you crying?" construction or the "why do you cry?" construction, but Swedish functions differently, so you can't translate word-for-word.

Learn Swedish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.