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"El departamento de zapatos"

Translation:The shoe department

5 years ago

66 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/matadorfeo

What's a shoe department?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErwinRos
ErwinRos
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Men's hell

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nglsigns

My wife would love to have a department of shoes...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chellger

Al Bundy agrees.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tsahj

A shoe store or section

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sky-man

Store was wrong with DL. Gave section as the answer.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PerilousPete

It's not a shoe store, it's the shoe area of a store that sells a range of products.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Drumknott
Drumknott
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Department stores have different sections for particular goods, like men's clothing, women's clothing, children's clothing, shoes, etc. These are called departments.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuperStinkyButt

hi,i like your explanation! hmmm...............now i get it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AX3Mx
AX3Mx
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So that's why they're called department stores all this time! Why didn't I realize that?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gergely552218

Like ministry of silly walks?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aperturelanai

1:you watched that? 2: what does that have to do with anything?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clampee

Having a department of shoes seems like the height of bureaucracy.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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Do you not have a special section in the large stores in your home country that sells only shoes? That is not the 'department of shoes', it is the 'shoe department.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rojolen

How come "The department of shoes" is wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/haidarahhusain
haidarahhusain
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April 2015, it is accepted (The department of shoes)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Silly Duo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheTishbite

It really shouldnt be, in my opinion. As a native speaker this sounds foreign to me.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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Yes indeed. Upon entering a department store, I have never asked for the Department of Shoes. The assistant would assume English was not my first language.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel13D
Daniel13D
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In languages one cannot translate literally. This could probably be right but would not be used so much in English. Hope this helps.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seveer
seveer
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I realize this may sound silly, but there are a lot of incredibly silly questions and answers on duolingo, so we should not discriminate too harshly. One example where "The Department of Shoes" would certainly be the correct translation is if it appeared in a satire of an expanding autocratic government that continually creates absurd new bureaucracies. In this case, the shoe department would fall flat, while The Department of Shoes would illicit laughter and might be considered quite witty.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatTancock
KatTancock
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Agree in principle - but it's worth using Occam's razor for translation, in which case use the most logical and common translation, rather than the obscure one that could possibly be right.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seveer
seveer
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Occam's razor really has nothing to do with this (there is no hypothesis at issue here, other than perhaps an implicit pedagogical one). If you are just advocating for simplicity, this may be laudable, but I don't see how allowing an acceptable translation increases complexity. Since "the department of shoes" would be the literal translation, it is almost certain that someone looked at the sentence and decided against it. I would argue that implementing an unnecessary stricture increases complexity in this instance.

As a learner, it would be more useful to know that while technically correct, a translation may be unusual or awkward, than to be told it is incorrect and left scratching one's head. In a traditional learning situation, I would not expect a teacher to teach me such a construction, but given the model employed here, it seems that if it is grammatically and substantially correct, it should be accepted, regardless of style (perhaps with a note on preferred usage.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatTancock
KatTancock
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First, I would argue that "department of shoes" is not a literal translation - it's word for word, which is not the same thing. But I agree that Duolingo could use some instruction on the practice of learning languages. A lot of the learners I see in discussions have obviously never been exposed to quality instruction in languages or linguistics and I really don't believe that a pure immersion model is the best way for adults to learn - they just get confused. Perhaps we need a separate Duolingo module on linguistics, translation and phonetic transcription?

The danger of allowing things like "department of shoes" is that I suspect a lot of these translations end up used in the opposite context - Spanish-speaking learners of English, eg - and allowing them will give those learners the impression that it's "good English" when it really isn't. I for one wouldn't want to be learning the Spanish equivalent to "department of shoes" and then finding out no Spanish speaker actually uses it. (Flashback to "zut alors" in grade 8 French!)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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@KatTancock. Zut alors! ;-) What is the difference between a word to word and a litteral translation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WildSage
WildSage
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I would also add that many of us use literal translations as a way of understanding another language. As a native english speaker I do not need my english corrected but the literal translation helps me to remember how the other language uses it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Erm, "elicit" not "illicit" which especially under your autocratic state woukd be illegal.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seveer
seveer
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But "woukd" would be acceptable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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No it woukdn't, seveer! But "Touché" for spotting my typo....!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RMHatz

That is correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WeekzGod
WeekzGod
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As a native english speaker, regardless of literal or not, it still is correct.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Unlike Spanish, English can use a noun as an adjective. Thus, the normal English is "shoe department", not "Department of Shoes" to refer to a place that sells retail shoes (i.e., shoe store).

Spanish, on the other hand, does not use a noun as an adjective. Instead it uses "de." Thus Spanish says: "El departamento de zapatos"

As others say above, in English, "Department of Shoes" is a title used in government; but if you want a place that sells shoes, look for a "Shoe Store" or a "Shoe Department" in a department or variety store.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielDayot
GabrielDayot
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I answered that and was marked correct now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TawMh

This is one of those phrases that sound so awesome in Spanish. I will have to drop it in in random conversation just for the fun of it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KristelRj

How do you say "the department of mysteries"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristianL723374

El Departamento de Misterio

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mundivagant
Mundivagant
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Why "the shoes department" is incorrect and only the singular form, "shoe" is accepted ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeyDC65

I've never really thought about the fact it's singular, but I can understand your inclination to make it plural.

However, Duolingo is correct to reject "The shoes department" as that is not proper English.

I believe this is because a department is a collective noun (it consists of multiple items all being referred to as one) and consequently is considered singular. "The shoe department", "The paint department", "The hardware department", "The clothing department", "The baby department", "The automotive department", "The jewelry department", etc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuoJisu
DuoJisu
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"The shoes department" was accepted with no correction - Feb 4, 2015

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Silly Duo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgeKing2

How to know when 'de' is used for ' about' or 'of'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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@native speakers: Is "sección" used more commonly?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lng52-._
Lng52-._
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In the previous translation, DL showed that departamento = apartment. Is that correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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I believe that is correct in Latin America. Spain uses 'apartamento'.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucy-kate
lucy-kate
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I know that zapatos are shoes, but when I saw this I thought 'the footwear department' would be a better translation - in the context of a department store, it would always be that and not 'the shoe department'. In Spanish is there a separate word for footwear?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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Generally in the UK we say 'Shoe Department'. 'Footwear' in Spanish is 'calzado'.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bykergrrl

Why is "departamento de zapatos" correct but "departamento de bebe" wrong? DL wanted "departamento para bebes" in an earlier question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

byker- The way you say it it's like if there was a department where they sell babies.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuoJisu
DuoJisu
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Might it have possibly meant "departamento (de cosas) para bebés"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beatle3

haha, it is simillar to the scene of monthy python circus where the people were walking very weard :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Glenn_Gould

The Department of Silly Walks. How is this possible without the Department of Shoes?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bigbadmanpig

The department of shoe land security

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WildSage
WildSage
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Is that to protect presidents from having shoes thrown at them?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KathrynMorgan15

I think that's my mom's favorite department

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dare3966
Dare3966
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the department of shoes - lol

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
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I have seen signs on the street for a departamento for rent, so is this used interchangeably with apartamento, apartment for rent? A little confusing..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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I believe 'departamento' is used in Latin America, whereas 'apartamento' is used in Spain.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PsychoTheory

Shoe department here!, this is Al Bundy speaking.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Doug190351

Its is only called a shoe department, not a shoes deparment.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/majamalinowska

so random

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mary586588

Again on this exercise which is selecting English words in boxes to translate a Spanish phrase, there is the Spanish word 'entidad' which pops up in many of these exercises. Does anyone else see that?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michelin1975

El departamento de los zapatos ? Le falta "los"?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JosephStal21801

I have auto-immune deficiency syndrome

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yannieyanxx
yannieyanxx
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Is there an English word, "depaements"? Because I just mispelled it and it said I used the wrong word, like seriously?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GordonGill3

Surely dept is not an error!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n9n9ku

I got it wrong because of 1 letter

6 months ago