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"Voy a andar a caballo mañana."

Translation:I am going to go horseback riding tomorrow.

5 years ago

126 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Zorro-Plateado

Jeez, last answer and knocked out with "i will go horse riding tomorrow" was wrong. I am English! We would NEVER say horseback riding. Where else would you ride a horse -don't answer that! LOL. I will report it. DL please translate to English as well as American!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGibbins

For Americans it is horseback riding, for British it is just horse riding. Makes you wonder how Americans were originally "riding" horses...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Now there is a totally English perspective. As an American, since our English obviously derived from yours, I would say what were the English originally riding that made the Americans want to clarify that statement for us. It's all a matter of perspective

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sousquark
sousquark
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American English didn't derive from UK English so much as modern American English and UK English derived from a common language and, for each language, some words stayed and others changed and new ones were added or became more popular.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes. You are exactly right and it is particularly appropriate here as horseback actually came into the English language in 14th or 15th Century, long before there was any such thing as American English. So the fact that UK English and American English uses different terms here may be interesting, but really says nothing about either dialect

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gom8z

Sorry friend but it's not perspective at all. Do you say you go for a biketop ride? Its not perspective at all haha. It's simply a trait of America to add style to the version of English they use. We go for a bike ride, a boat ride, a donkey ride and a horse ride.... the simole thing i want to know is, in spanish, there is no additional word to mean horseback instead of horse.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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No. A caballo basically means horseback. If you think about it, Americans use horseback pretty consistently, but not really camelback or elephant back. Of course we had wild horses in America but never wild elephants or camels. Riding horses is certainly not soley an American thing, but riding horses are inextricably entwined with the settlement of the West and of course cowboy and Indian stories.

It is more unusual for me to see andar a caballo instead of montar a caballo. I do believe that the latter verb is more common for riding a horse. I translated one of my mother's favorite sayings into Spanish early on as it has that common Conditional + past subjunctive construction. Si deseos fueran caballos, mandigos montarían. If wishes were horses, beggars would ride. I don't think andar would work there as well

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hillberg

I'm from the US and I would just say I am going to ride horse tomorrow, or horse riding. I see my grammar check doesn't like it though. I think we should remember that we have a lot of localizations in countries on how things are said. I have been to places in this country where I couldn't understand a thing being said.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/julesew
julesew
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Same for me - I am irish and we would never say horseback riding either - in fact we dont even say horse!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulsagra

Yup! I have just reported tbe same.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

I can't believe they haven't added horse riding to the database yet - I reported it over a year ago more than once. Maybe one day ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

Still being marked wrong in March 2015 ... I've put in yet another report.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jenna_swiss
jenna_swiss
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Thanks! It's been added!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I do sympathize with you. I am also on Wlinguo which, I believe, is English. Some of their translations seem strange to me. That site does not have such free translation though, so it isn't quite the same problem. But I do a double take every time they translate automóvil as motorcar. And there was some term for what I think was just a notebook that I wasn't sure of. I think they have changed that now. I can't remember what it was but it was something like flipper. But, although I am as annoyed and perhaps confused when Duo doesn't accept what is an acceptable, they have done a rather impressive job doing what is difficult - allowing all correct translations. But it is sometimes difficult for a native speaker to remember that the language s/he speaks is not necessarily the same one as what another English speaker speaks. As an American, now that they have accepted horse riding, I did a real double take when I saw that as a possible answer. We ride horses or we ride horseback, but we never horse ride. I lived in London when I was 14 for a year. I learned a couple of things: A biro is a pen, a rubber IS NOT a condom, and it is perfectly acceptable for a guy to say he is going to knock up a girl without having her father and/or brother come after him with a shotgun. Maybe Duo needs and English course for Americans and an American course for the English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-Canguro

I am with you Zorro, Amigo !

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blackwell

American tautology :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/machtibor

I never heard the expression horseback riding before, actually :) I thought it was one of those clumsy DL translations.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CeeCeeSong

we would always say horseback riding now horse riding! American.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattShanah4

I am sure that over time Duolingo will start to accommodate the less popular English language dialects, like English English

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clari64

Horse riding isn't an English dialect. When we climb onto a horse and move with the horse, be that walking with the horse, galloping with the horse or racing with the horse, we refer to this as 'horse riding'. In America it is referred to as 'Horseback riding'. They are merely different ways to describe the pastime. In the UK horse riding is the only way to refer to this pastime, certainly not a 'less popular English dialect'.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattShanah4

Clari4, if DL had allowed it, you would have seen a winking smiley face to indicate that I was joking. I follow this definition of dialect:

One usage refers to a variety of a language that is a characteristic of a particular group of the language's speakers.[1] Under this definition, the dialects or varieties of a particular language are closely related and, despite their differences, are most often largely mutually intelligible, especially if close to one another on the dialect continuum. The term is applied most often to regional speech patterns, but a dialect may also be defined by other factors, such as social class or ethnicity.[2] A dialect that is associated with a particular social class can be termed a sociolect, a dialect that is associated with a particular ethnic group can be termed as ethnolect, and a regional dialect may be termed a regiolect.[3] According to this definition, any variety of a given language constitutes "a dialect", including any standard varieties. In this case, the distinction between the "standard language" (i.e. the "standard" dialect of a particular language) and the "nonstandard" dialects of the same language is often arbitrary and based on social, political, cultural, or historical considerations.[4][5][6] In a similar way, the definitions of the terms "language" and "dialect" may overlap and are often subject to debate, with the differentiation between the two classifications often grounded in arbitrary and/or sociopolitical motives.[7]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dialect

Now, I suspect that you are using dialect in the sense of a group of speakers whose usage differs from the dominant usage of the language. Assuming that ste6601 was using that definition, I was trying to gently needle him by pointing out that per that definition, English-English is a dialect of English, inasmuch as American Standard English is the dominant usage, at least in terms of numbers.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ste6601

Am getting really annoyed with all these stupid Americanisms. Speak the Queen's English or start your own language.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That's such an ignorant statement. Neither the English spoken in the UK nor the English spoken in the US is the language of King James which was the Kings English when my ancestors started coming from England, Ireland, and Wales. There are some elements that American English has retained that British English has lost, there are some elements that British English has retained that American English has lost, there are some elements that have changed in both languages independently, but obviously many elements have remained the same since I can easily address you over 500 years later.

I always am amused by the people on who figure they have some special right to claim dominion over English because they live in the country that caused its name. But they are on Duo learning Latin American Spanish or Brazilian Portuguese from an American based company. One of the major reasons for learning Latin American Spanish or Brazilian Portuguese or American English is that a lot more people live in these countries and speak these dialects than live in the "Old World"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattShanah4

Were you really intending to say to me, as you did down-thread, "[a]pparently, you are not paying attention"?" If so, perhaps you misunderstood my point, as I certainly wasn't criticizing Duolingo's emphasis on LA Spanish.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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No I wasn't addressing you. I was addressing ste6601 because he said

"The language we are learning is Spanish, from mainland Europe, not the Spanish spoken in Mexico, Argentina, or any other of the South American countries"

We learn Latin American Spanish on Duo from American English. I probably went overboard, but, while I enjoy discovering and discussing language change in various forms, it always annoys me when people start proclaiming that they are the ones who speak the only correct way. But I did think he would be happier on a platform that shared his goals.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ste6601

Firstly, I said, "Queen's English"; not "King's English". Our Monarch, Queen Elizabeth II was coronated in 1953, after her Father, King George V's passing. The King James, as you state was completed in 1611. I still use my King James Bible today in preference to all the other, in my opinion, flawed translations.

The language we are learning is Spanish, from mainland Europe, not the Spanish spoken in Mexico, Argentina, or any other of the South American countries. I went to University this year to learn Spanish, taught by native Spaniards. Learning English and speaking English in Scotland, which is where I live (although I am English), they were perfectly comfortable with the original English words used.

I find it distasteful that DUOLINGO has the American bias for the English translations, given that we (the UK) has a lot of historical connection with Spain, through trade routes, wars, etc. British tourists are a vital resource for Spain within its economy. British people will learn Spanish to help them when they go on holiday there in their hundreds of thousands. To not have the option, other than US English, when we do not, and will not ever use those words is unpalatable.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattShanah4

As someone once said, "A language is a dialect with an army and a navy." I would find your allegiance to "The Queen's English" quaint, were it nor for the fact that the primacy you grant that DIALECT was used as a justification by Imperial England and its colonizers to suppress and destroy other languages around the world (e.g., Irish, Scottish, Welsh, and innumerable indigenous languages overseas). Of course the English were not alone in this endeavor; all the colonizers did it, and the process continues to the present day (e.g., Chinese suppression of Tibetan; English-only legislation in the US). Also, the idea that "The Queen's English" or Castilian Spanish is some pure standard to which one should strive is very convenient to those who speak those dialects, but it ignores the way language works: language is what people say, regardless of what some 19th century linguistic prescriptivist wrote down. Languages change; Shakespeare would have a hard time having himself understood were he to magically appear and ask for directions, much less try to order a double Venti Latte at his local Starbucks. ;-)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Apparently, you are not paying attention. Duolingo teaches Latin American Spanish. You can't always tell from the apps description, but online it states it clearly. And you can also tell by both the fact that there are no exercises using Vosotros, although Vosotros forms are generally accepted in answers, vocabulary choices are mostly Latin American like succo instead of zumo, and none of the audio has any of the characteristics of Spanish from Spain like pronouncing z and soft c like th. Now a lot of people use Duolingo who actually want to learn Castilian Spanish, since the differences aren't that much, but they are probably as great as those between US and UK English. I do know that there are free Spanish programs out there that do teach Castilian Spanish, and quite a few of them do so from strictly British English. I know this because I did struggle with a few meanings that vary between our dialects. These might be better for you. My reason for choosing Duo had more to do with the fact that it teaches Latin American Spanish than that it uses American English. L

You talked about the relationship between Spain and the UK. Obviously the US has many such relationships throughout the Americas. Mexico has by far the most Spanish speakers in the world and the United States now has the 2nd place. It makes sense for a company based in Pennsylvania to develop a Spanish course teaching the language spoken by almost 16% of the US population and having the largest population Speaking it in the world just across our Southern Border.

http://spanishlanguagedomains.com/the-numbers-of-spanish-speakers-in-the-world-exceeds-500-million/

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/jun/29/us-second-biggest-spanish-speaking-country

Despite being US based, Duo does go quite a lot by the contributors language. Try the Welsh course. They do tend to use your Queen's English. I am an American. I have neither King nor Queen, though English has been the native Language in my family for as far back as I have been able to trace (circa 1300).

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattShanah4

I find it distasteful that DUOLINGO has the American bias for the English translations, given that we (the UK) has a lot of historical connection with Spain, through trade routes, wars, etc.

Perhaps Duolingo gives primacy to Latin American Spanish and American English because of the vastly greater numbers of speakers in the ex-colonies vs. the colonial countries themselves. Of course, there is nothing wrong with pursuing fluency is the relatively minor dialects of the language they you are interested in ;-)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimpleIN

yes it is strange ..what does it mean .. horse reading? idiom ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Well there are actually people called "horse-whisperers". Bedtime stories? Not necessary if the horse can read too! :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StuFoster
StuFoster
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How do you say "I'm going to walk a horse tomorrow" ..like walking a dog... not riding it!? Would you still use andar!?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josh.ramirez500
josh.ramirez500
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"voy a llevar a un caballo a caminar"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Larrimus

What's the "llevar" for?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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His answer was basically I am going to take the horse for a walk, so llevar is to take. I think a simpler answer to the initial question would be to simply to change the andar a to andar el. Actually I would probably use caminar el caballo, but I don't think there is any meaning difference. I actually learned montar a caballo as horseback riding. I don't know if it is regional or what, but certainly it doesn't have the same possible confusion.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattnag
mattnag
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I wonder the same thing, and my best guess is that you would have to use 'caminar.' Or perhaps there's a completely different verb with that meaning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CeeCeeSong

YES!!! That's what I thought it was saying, I am going to walk the horse tomorrow. We DO walk horses here, (in America), besides going horseback riding!!! Especially when breaking them in.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/donmack-TX

How is "I am going to ride a horse tomorrow" wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Duo does not have the all of the correct answers in its database. 'Unaccepted by Duo' does not necessarily mean it is 'wrong' -- but it is very frustrating.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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Accepted 1.22.14

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fernhopper

It was wrong fo me - 09.02.15

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdntinpusher

Just hit "Report a Problem." if you think it should be accepted, and check "My answer should be accepted." They do look at them and have added lots of new answers.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcrand
dcrand
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Your answer is now counted as correct. Mine, "I will go by horse tomorrow" is correct according to the hints but they counted it wrong. Anyone care to provide a little explanation here? Thanks in advance.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/prawesome

I see no problem with "I will go by horse tomorrow" either

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

dcrand, Your answer might be correct if you were Paul Revere :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErnestoEnrique

I wrote the same thing. But, upon closer inspection, there is no "un". I suspect that "andar a caballo" must more closely translate to "go horseback riding".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J9Z
J9Z
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Well, I got this wrong for a different reason, my answer was really close, but what gets me is that this sentence sounds like "I'm going to walk a horse" ( which IS something someone might do, as opposed to riding it). The verb phase I've always known and used for riding a horse (or a bike, or motorcycle, etc.) is "montar a caballo." Anyone else know this phrase?? Is it a regional thing?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zuquita

I don't know if it's regional, but that is what they say in Mexico, most definitely.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wklem88

I answered "I am going to walk a horse tomorrow" because, like J9Z, I learned the phrase to ride a horse is "montar a caballo".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I am suprised that no native speaker has indicated how to say you walk a horse. I suspect you use the preposition con instead of a. Prepositions tend to have a sort of personality within a language, and that is my sense, but it is all speculation. As for montar al caballo, I do think it is the most common way to say ride a horse. When I was first learning the conditional to subjunctive if then pattern, I used several translators to translate something my mother used to say when I was a kid as a model. They all came up with the same sentence: "Si deseos fuerron caballos, mendingos montarían" If wishes were horses, beggars would ride

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J9Z
J9Z
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Hey, I like that expression, and like hearing it in Spanish, too! Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Yes, one of my grandmother's sayings too. Thanks for jogging my memory.

You are very welcome to share your best shot for "I am going to walk the horse tomorrow" in Spanish.
Tell you what. I'll do the same and we'll see who raises the most laughs! :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Well I don't know how amusing it will be, but I think maybe Voy a pasear al caballo. That is how I have heard walk the door. If I used andar or caminar which might be more confusing for horses, I would say Voy a caminar con el caballo. That of course removes horse as a direct object.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I wrote mine down in advance (trust me!). And now I can't find it --- hold on, here it is: I suggest "Voy sacar a pasear el caballo mañana."

I avoided andar because it seems to be only an intransitive verb.

By the way, I guess you meant "walking the dog". You got a laugh from me for "walking the door". I also wondered whether caminar might mean "walk on the horse" - maybe in the circus - hey! Can I take photos?

Now, let's see if rspreng or any of our horseback riding cousins pop in to correct us.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I couldn't respond directly to your post. I am never sure what that means. I am sure that your suggestion has too many verbs together and you can't use ir without a preposition I don't think. You used sacar to indicate that you took the horse out of the stable? I think that might be Voy a sacar el caballo para pasear a él or something along those lines. Hopefully someone will jump in somewhere where they can. Sorry about the "door" I do all this on my phone. Big fingers and small touch keys don't go together. Probably hit some suggested word by mistake.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheAnkhorus

I've always heard "montar" as well. This is the first I've seen "andar"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cookj

"I am going horseback riding tomorrow" Why is this incorrect?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nueby
nueby
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My hypothesis is derived from accepting that "to ride a horse" works grammatically as "to go horseback riding" (or perhaps even "to go horse riding"). Once you accept this, your answer uses up its only "going" for another purpose than the future tense construction, so you are left with the present continuous that did not exist in the Spanish version.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jenna_swiss
jenna_swiss
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This is your friendly American English-speaking (and thus heretofore painfully oblivious to the common use of the word collocation "horse riding" by many other speakers of English) course contributor with a message for all: "horse riding" is now accepted as a translation for this sentence! Cheers!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skeez1960

how about "I am going to go on horseback tomorrow" as in "I was hiking today, but tomorrow..."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hesolomon

How about: "I am going to walk a horse tomorrow."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robsm
robsm
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'horseback riding' is a US idiom imo. it wouldn't be said in normal conversation in Australia either.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-Canguro

True robsm.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

OK. What would you say in Australia? You're on the beastie, after all, and you may not be walking if you're on the horse, but could be running, trotting, etc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robsm
robsm
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here one would just say ' riding ' .

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

Ah! So it's the "horseback" part that's not in your lingo? If so, I must admit that the horse holds a unique spot in our language. After all, if one were to ride a camel or elephant (both of which I've ridden, but needless to say aren't commonly ridden around here), nobody would say they were "elephantback riding." I suppose that given the horse's iconic place in US history, it's earned an equally distinguished place in our language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-Canguro

The horse was VERY important in Australia, and still is.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CeeCeeSong

because horses were also commonly "ridden" in carriages and lorries, therefore the differentiation of horseBACK riding became common.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/milus38

That was my answer too. I was thinking about a cool down for the sweaty animal after a long hot ride.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kalabash1
Kalabash1
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I am going horse riding tomorrow. That should be an acceptable answer in my opinion.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vorcooper
Vorcooper
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I agree that should be accepted. 'Horseback riding' is American idiom. Horse riding is how other English speakers would say it. Both are correct in my opinion.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kpferdeort
kpferdeort
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If "horseback riding" is an American idiom, it's one this American has never heard ;). I would just say "horse riding."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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How interesting! I, also American, have never heard horse riding. I have always heard horseback riding. We say "We are going to ride horses" or "We are going horseback riding."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

I agree but it obviously hasn't been added yet (14.1.14) - lost a heart!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

You should try to reply to the actual comment you're referring to because DL shifts comments around based on others "bumping" them up or down with the little arrows

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

Hi eshewan. My reply was to Kalabash1 as you can see from the indentations but, as you say, Duo shifts things around so it's not always clear. BTW I haven't had this question for a while does anyone know if "horse riding" been added to the database yet?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

I am embarrassed :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sallyann_54

I agree this should be accepted. We don`t say horseback riding in normal speak!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaiah-

Depends where you're from. People say horseback riding in normal speech.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grytr
Grytr
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"horseback riding is normal speech"? Not in the UK it isn't. See OED: "horseback ride, horseback riding, are expressions used chiefly in U.S.; in England, ride, riding are understood to be on horseback, unless otherwise expressed or implied, as ‘a ride in a wagon’, ‘a bicycle ride’ ". Duolingo, please cater for your British students.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

Horse riding still isn't accepted and for some reason I can't report "my answer should be accepted".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-Canguro

Same here in Australia Grytr, thanks. 19-Jan-2015

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Riich3lle

Why is Duolingo teaching us more Future Phrasal when it should be teaching the actual future tense: I will, you will, he/she will..... ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/macie94

Since when is andar riding?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zuquita

Good question. Since what I've always heard used in Mexico for riding was 'montar a caballo', I translated this as 'I am going to go on horse tomorrow' and was rejected.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/midmo63359

My dictionary uses the verb montar

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-Canguro

Montar a caballo should defintely be accepted

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susanelizabeth58

In UK we do not say horseback riding, it is horse riding

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DannyMcKil
DannyMcKil
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Is this the narrowest accepted on DL? There are several ways to say this in English. It seems that most are not a accepted. The quoted correct one is one I would never use.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markgjensen

i don't get the "i am going to go." "voy a" is to be interpreted as "i am going to go?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hesolomon

"I am going horseback riding tomorrow." This was marked wrong. I will report it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MargaretAm500786

This is still marked as incorrect. I will report it as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tami0220

Why wouldn't "I am going horseback riding tomorrow " not be accepted. Why do i have to have to say i am going TO GO horseback riding tomorrow

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

As everyone knows, the term "horseback" predates the English colonies (both in America and Australia). So, you shouldn't be too hard on Duo if you no longer choose to use the word. Also, in movie westerns, "indians" have been shown horseside* riding to escape notice by US cavalry, as have outlaws to shield themselves from the bullets of lawmen. As there is no greater authority than the movies, I believe we have answered the question of why American English speakers continue to say "horseback riding," QED.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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It is interesting that when I was young and lived in England my mother's boss at the University of London told her that American English was more like the English spoken in England before colonization. Now he was not a linguist and was actually wrong, but he recognized that many American terms were those used in England before the colonies were established. The reality is that neither standard British English nor standard American English matches the language spoken in England in the early 1600s when my earliest ancestors came to this country from England Language is fluid. Even the English spoken in England today is not one homogeneous language, and the same is definitely true for the US. And the process of natural language change was exacerbated by the distance and more limited interaction of that time.

As an aside, in American English one might say I ride English saddle, I ride Westen saddle or I ride bareback. I assume Western saddle is less common in England, but do the British say English saddle and bareback?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lincoln180952

walk a horse or ride a horse - if you know horses BOTH are done regularly

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CeeCeeSong

Which is why I thought they were talking about walking the horse...but, no!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/travellers2

"To go" is reduntant in this sentence, also the word "horseback" is not normally used in UK English. To go riding is generally assumed to go horse riding

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rapunzela2

Is "a caballo" just for pets (v. horses you don't know) or is "andar a caballo" prepositional phrase?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Indigoes
Indigoes
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I wonder, would "I will ride horseback tomorrow," make sense?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manny540266

Can ANYBODY break this sentence down in english word for word? We have 79 responses here and no one has answers

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Voy a - I am going to. This is a way to make a future statement which reflects the English construction. Duo generally translates this with the parallel form and translates the will future for the future tense

Andar- to walk (some expressions using the infinitive end up with an extra "to" although others do not.

a caballo- literally to horse. This is a prepositional phrase whose function is to make the horse the object or recipient of the action of the verb. Andar a caballo or montar a caballo are ways to say ride a horse although the consensus here is that the latter is more common. Horseback riding is the common expression in American English which avoids using an article.

Mañana- tomorrow.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manny540266

Thanks! So this sentence will literally translate into "I will walk by horse tomorrow"??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Well I think it is closer to walk on horse to walk by horse as that "by" is pretty much one which would always use por in Spanish, but translating prepositions is often tricky because although they often seem to translate pretty consistently one way, there are often many expressions where they are used differently. I did look up montar in my RAE Spanish dictionary and one of the definitions it gave was andar a caballo, which does suggest this is a basic phrase. I also discovered there is a verb cabalgar which specifically means to ride a horse.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manny540266

Thanks a lot for clearing that up!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jan580021

Their sentence does not make sense. What does "go to horse" mean?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexm3728

Duolingo didn't quite pick up what I said on the mic, and accepted "voy a ir a caballo manana." I would think that this would imply "I am going to go (to a location) by horse tomorrow," which has a slightly different meaning than this sentence. Is the connotation different in Spanish?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes ir a caballo or ir por caballo is the equivalent of saying go by horse. The voice recognition function on Dúo is quite flawed. I have had the simplest of Spanish words rejected and words I mispronounced or stumbled on accepted. Clearly it is not their intention to accept any spoken sentence other then the one presented, but you sentence does express a valid possible statement, although with a different meaning than this. Of course I am pretty much a city person so even in English I don't know whether people are likely to say go by horse like they would go by bus or train.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexm3728

As someone who grew up in the country, "go by horse" is valid, but generally we just drove ;)

Thanks for confirming what I thought. It's funny how Duo can be so picky about choice of words in some instances, and so loose in others.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CeeCeeSong

Amen to THAT! really can't get inside their mindset, lol!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mmemerson
mmemerson
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so why is that when i type horse riding into google it comes back with horseback riding? i ride a horse. i rode a horse. Great Britain, US or elsewhere. but when I use the word 'go' with it, i have to say 'horseback.' moreover, i am going horseback riding is perfectly acceptable. i don't have to say i am going to go horseback riding.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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In America you ride a horse, but you go horseback riding. It is a grammatically different construction. I ride a horse is Subject+ transitive verb +object. But I go riding/am going riding is Subject+ intransitive verb phrase. If you use that phrase and want to specify how you ride, you use the adverb horseback or a prepositional phrase like on a horse or on a train.

As for the difference between I am going and I am going to go, it is a tense issue. In many languages including both Spanish and English, you can use the present to indicate the immediate future. This is extended to some extent in practice with the use of the present progressive of the verb to go instead of the phrasal future of to go due to the seeming redundancy of going to go. But there is no grammatical rule justifying this. In both languages when you say Mañana you could use present tense, but Duo's convention is tense for tense. Here you are given the Spanish phrasal future and Duo expects the phrasal future in translation. With most other verbs, it would seem more natural.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clari64

The term horse riding IS most certainly used all the time in the UK. It is NOT a colloquial way to describe the practice of riding a horse as pastime.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I was looking for the comment that seems to have gotten you upset, and I didn't see anything that said that ride horse was a colloquial use. It is, however, a UK use, not an American usage. We do say that we are going riding, but if we put horse in the mix it is always horseback. But it was not an American coinage. The use of horseback can be traced back to the 1300s, long before Europe knew there was land over here.

https://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2006/11/why-do-americans-say-horseback-riding.html

The point is that language change is happening constantly everywhere. But any language activity has to have a standard reference. There are many language programs out there that base their English on UK English. I have used some and understand the difficulties. In Spanish the bigger problem for me was that they mostly taught Castilian Spanish from Spain and I wanted to learn Latin American Spanish. Duo teaches Latin American Spanish from an American English perspective. They do try to stay open to UK words etc to some extent, but you will have to expect American English standards first, especially in the Spanish course. The US now has the second largest Spanish speaking population in the world after México. I have dabbled in the Welsh course and there you will find much more UK usage. That is because, no doubt, that is the English that was spoken by the language experts designing that course.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScienceFic2

They don't allow "I will go riding tomorrow". Never heard anyone say "horseriding" or "horseback riding."

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Horseriding is UK English. Horseback riding is, however, quite common in the US. After reading your comment, I was going to do a search on the term horseback riding. I entered the word horse into the search and the first suggestion on the list was Horseback riding San Diego (where I live). I have never searched for that, so that tells me that many others around here have. I don't know where you live, but you should try a search on the phrase.

As for just riding, I agree that most times people say that they are going riding they mean on a horse, but not always. Duo should probably accept that. Report it.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaniloAustria
DaniloAustria
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how sneaky :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WernerRetief
WernerRetief
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"horseriding" perfect South African English

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jlottey
jlottey
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The previous time this appeared that was marked wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jlottey
jlottey
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I'm sorry, excuse me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jason463529

I thought andar was to walk?? I am going to walk to horse tomorrow?! Estoy muy confundido :/

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mojavejeeper

After running across other uses of andar with bicycles also I am lead to believe that "andar" had more to do with moving from place to place, rather than how that was done. If you consider, until very recently for most people, most of the time walking was the most usual choice with horses an option for richer folk. Now I'm also wondering if there's a connection to english's "amble" as in "amble over to the park."

20 hours ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan_dos
Dan_dos
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I am going horseback riding tomorrow I am going horse riding tomorrow. I am going to go horseback riding tomorrow

What the hell is the difference between the three statements above. Who in the hell says "I'm going horse riding tomorrow" ? Please give me a freaking break. Will there ever be a reasonable translator on this freakin site?

3 years ago