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"I walk with my cat on Sundays."

Translation:Siúlaim le mo chat ar an Domhnach.

November 23, 2014

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

Could you say 'ar domhnai' or 'ar na domhnai'? If not, when would you ever use the word 'domhnai'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

"On Sundays" here means habitually, so you would use Ar an Domhnach. You would never use domhaigh with the ar an structure. However, if you are talking about a particular Sunday (usually the one coming, ex "I will walk my dog Sunday") and not habitually, you would use Dé Domhnaigh.

Siúilfaidh mé mo mhadra Dé Domhnaigh (I will walk my dog Sunday)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

Thanks. I mean GRMA. But haven't I seen 'domhnai' meaning 'Sundays' on one of these exercises? When would you ever use that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

domhnaí is the plural, meaning "Sundays". But, you wouldn't use it to express "on Sundays" as Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla suggests (says ar an Domhnach means "on Sundays")

Also, my fault earlier. I thought you meant domhnaigh instead of domhnaí


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

So you might say something like, "Sundays are fun days"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tadhg-Monabot

After 'ar an' why is Domhnach not eclipsised? Go raibh maith agat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tadhg-Monabot

SatharnPHL Go raibh maith agat - Tadhg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lauraclare15

I am a woman. Would it then be 'Siúlaim le mo cat ar an Domhnach.' ??? Or is C always lenited with the first person possessive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

The singular possessive adjectives mo, do and a("his") lenite. The plural possessive adjectives ár, bhur and a("their") eclipse. When a means "her" it doesn't lenite or eclipse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miax101

Can someone help me understand why 'mh' is sometimes pronounced like a 'w' and sometimes like a 'v'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sugar8Skull

Could someone please explain (in simple enough terms), why in this example is the form of the pronoun 'with', "le" and not "leis"? Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miax101

So you only use “leis” when it’s followed by the word “an/na”, or when it’s short for “with him” (le é). If it’s not followed by “an” or “na,” then you use “le.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sugar8Skull

Ah thank you! I get it now! Makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cyncat1

Why does Domhnach require a definite article here? Wouldn't "Sundays" be indefinite?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

An Irish speaker might well ask why "Sundays" doesn't require a definite article?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cyncat1

My understanding is that using prepositional phrase "ar x" indicates a habitual activity. I walk with my cat on Sundays in general, not on any specific Sunday. That's as indefinite a usage as possible, I think.

Unless days of the week are always definite in Irish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

You're analyzing that from an English speaker's point of view.

What's the difference between "I walk my cat on Sundays" and "I walk my cat on Sunday"? "Sundays" may be indefinite, but "Sunday" is definite - there is only one Sunday in the week.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cyncat1

"Yes, days of the week are always definite in Irish" would have been a sufficient answer to my question. I appreciate that you're trying to help, but repeatedly telling me that I'm being English gives me no useful information.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

I didn't say "Yes, days of the week are always definite in Irish" because I don't know that to be true. Maybe it is, maybe it isn't.

I didn't say that you were "being English", I said that were seeing things from an English speaker's point of view. I don't need to know whether "days of the week are always definite in Irish" to recognize the chauvinism in your assumption that Irish must be wrong because of how you analyzed the sentence in English. If you don't find it useful to be reminded that when Irish and English take a different approach, it isn't because there's a flaw in the way Irish works, then so be it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MxLaurel

A perfectly normal Sunday activity.

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