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https://www.duolingo.com/harvard14

How to roll my r's?

I love learning spanish, but I always have trouble rolling my r's. Tips or Suggestions? Gracias. ¡Ustedes son fenomenal amigos!

3 years ago

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/bobster708

just pretend your a racecar

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liamtbrand
liamtbrand
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Vrrrrroom, vrrrrroom :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liamtbrand
liamtbrand
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Try breathing out through your mouth and then moving your tongue back from your teeth, lightly holding it up against the roof until it vibrates. Make sure the tip of your tongue is away from your front teeth, but still near the front of your mouth, if you can get it to bounce try move it back and forth a little to find where the sweet spot is. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harvard14

Thanks. And by the way, i'm amazed how many languages you are learning! Great job!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cyneburg
Cyneburg
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You kind of vibrate your tongue on the roof of your mouth. I grew up with the sound and my mom would ask me if I could do it growing up so it's kind of natural to me. I've known people who have taken Spanish for years and just can't do it no matter how hard they try. My dad does a very weak version of it. It's cute lol.

My mom told me as a kid growing up to get the sound the nuns would have them practice railroad, ferrocarril. I guess you can practice with that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supainanoko
supainanoko
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In elementary school, we had a whole tongue twister like that: erre con erre cigarro, erre con erre barril, rapido corren los carros cargados con rocas al ferrocarril.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

Oh my god, I remember that one too!

The rhyme ended "boom boom" for some reason.

When I googled for more info on the toungetwister, I found this page with six more fun ones. That tres tigres one kind of killed me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harvard14

Thanks :) Ill try it!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zuquita

This might sound crazy, but I could never roll my Rs until I started to watch a lot of Spanish tv. I wasn't speaking at all, but I was spending hours watching telenovelas. Suddenly, I could roll 'em.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/korra112244

Do you have any telenova recommendations?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zuquita

Lots! Sometime I'll do a post about them and how much Spanish I've learned from them, but for now, here's this:

I'm in the US and really can only access Mexican ones. Also, I don't care for the dark and violent narco-war thriller type, the ones for teeny boppers, and as for any that attempt to be funny, let's just say that Mexican comedy doesn't export well and leave it at that.

So, within in the more traditional love story ones that I prefer, I can't really recommend any that are airing right now, but good older ones that you can find being rebroadcast sometimes, or on youtube or a service like HULU Plus (as far as I know, Netflix doesn't have any or many) are: Teresa, La Que No Podia Amar, and Amor Bravio.

Others that are good but not fantastic (IMO) are: Destilando Amor and Mentir Para Vivir. One that was really bad in many ways but had lots of wonderful mariachi music that almost made it worthwhile was Que Bonito Amor.

I watch them with the Spanish subtitles and that helps my comprehension tremendously. I've also learned to read really fast! I'd also recommend starting watching them from the beginning or close to it. They go on for 150 or 200 episodes sometimes, so the plots get complicated and it's hard to just jump in the middle and try to figure out 'que the heck' is going on.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/korra112244

Thanks so much! I watch alot of Korean dramas, so I was hoping to find a similar way to practice Spanish. I will look up these titles and watch with Spanish subtitles. Wow, 150 episodes is so long!!! But thanks! Estoy emocionada! (:

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zuquita

You're very welcome.

150 (or more) episodes is really long, and sometimes there is a lot of fluff and filler to extend the story. I guess that it is relatively cheap and low risk for the studio to produce more episodes to make an existing, successful novel longer, compared to producing a new show. For whatever reason, it is rampant.

One good thing is that there is a clear beginning, middle and end to the stories. They don't go on and on for decades and never end like the American ones.

Mentir Para Vivir is a fairly short one at about 60 episodes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jemar1

What methods were you using when 'practising'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zuquita

Jemar1, if you are asking me what I was doing to practice rolling Rs, the answer is nothing in particular. I had studied Spanish off and on for years and had tried all the usual ways to learn to roll Rs, but I could never do it. When I started watching novelas, I didn't have much opportunity to speak in Spanish, but I was hearing a lot of it. Then, when I did speak, all of a sudden, rolled Rs were happening for me and I'd say that in general my pronunciation improved a lot. I can't explain it, other than there is a link between listening and pronunciation, even if it doesn't seem that apparent. The novelas gave me more extensive listening practice than I had ever had before. First language has to go into our brains before it can come out.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/korra112244

For K-dramas I would watch them with English subtitles. It basically lets you hear the language-- its sounds, speech pattern, etc.I would also pick up a few words and phrases, and it sure is motivating to make you want to learn the language so you can watch the show without subtitles. For Spanish dramas, since i am used to reading in the language, I will watch them with Spanish subs so I can SEE and hear the language, because Spanish is a fast-paced language (at least in comparison to English)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zuquita

For me, I find it really beneficial to see and hear the language simultaneously. Plus it is better according to language learning theory to simply try to understand the target language and not rely on translation, or as little as possible. I do rely on the subtitles, but at least it is still the language that I want to learn, and my next project with the telenovelas is to wean myself off of the subtitles. I amazes me now, after two years of a lot of novela watching, that I still can't understand that much without them.

I also find it helps to be able to stop the video to give me time to read and comprehend and to back up and replay scenes several times.

BTW, youtube subtitles, if they exist at all, are really bad. With Hulu Plus, it depends on the show, I've found, but generally they are good.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supainanoko
supainanoko
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First of all, are you flipping your r's? Flipped r's are a bit like d's: your tongue touches the roof of your mouth just behind your front teeth. Next, you can try saying "dra" or "tra" with flipped r's--your tongue will bounce a little. Then try saying "drra" and bouncing on each r. It is not exactly rolling your r's, but your tongue will get used to bouncing which is a part of it. (I don't know for a fact that this works. I have been trying to teach my sister, who is otherwise fluent in Spanish and she has improved a bit.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harvard14

Thank you! I'll defiantly try this. :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

Man, I have the hardest time with it too. My husband grew up with a Spanish-speaking abuela and great-aunts: though he didn't learn the language as a first language, he grew up hearing the sounds, and he can't do it reliably either!

I can really only do it when the rr comes after a plosive consonant like /p/ or /b/, when air really pushes past my tongue. That said, this video was pretty helpful for me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harvard14

I actually found another video while watching the one you recommended I watch! Thank you, here is the link if you are interested :-) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKRQMCHlONU

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

Oooh, here's a good one too! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9eN2B7Wj68

I only watched the first part of the 8 min video, but her "make a u shape" really clicked when I saw the above video. Nice find!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

My sister taught me many years ago. Her Spanish teacher told her to exaggerate saying the name Christopher Columbus. You say... Ka - RRRRRRistopher. Columbus is optional. lol

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harvard14

I tried this, it worked out really well! Tu eres muy intellegente, muchos gracias.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

De nada pero mi hermana merece el crédito.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Autistic_Monster

My trick is to thrust my tongue forward really quickly so that it almost touches the back of my top teeth but not quite. Not too difficult, no?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danaibalt

RIght, my native language has rolled r's so I might be very unhelpful but ill give it a shot and give you some advice;

people have said use the tip of your tongue and the ceiling of you mouth. I tend to disagree: use the tip of your tongue and your teeth. flick it off the tip of your teeth. keep doing that then add some breathyness and you might have a good result

AS I said, I naturally roll my r's so this might be wrongly described but try it :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liamtbrand
liamtbrand
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I roll my r's natively too (from Dutch), but I can't seem to roll it on my teeth? - Maybe it depends on the person? What language do you speak natively? - I'm just wondering if the rolling r you talk about is the same or whether it's a different variation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danaibalt

I speak greek. I think it does vary on what letters precede and follow the r (thats what my mom researches :P)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liamtbrand
liamtbrand
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Awesome xD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanHouseman

put your tongue lightly just behind your teeth on the upper palate, and push out the air.

3 years ago