"A man wants food."

Translation:Teastaíonn bia ó fhear.

November 23, 2014

11 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sam.eckmann

Why does tá work but not teastaíonn?

April 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

Do all of these prepositions used this way lenite the noun following?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

If the following noun is without an article, then these prepositions will lenite the noun: a, de, do, faoi, mar, ó, roimh, trí, and um. There are particular rules for the prepositions ar, gan, idir, and thar; sometimes they’ll lenite the following noun, and sometimes they won’t.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

OK. I will cross that bridge when I come to it. Right now, genitive is looming.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tiernanbas

Jesus i am fluent in irish and im fairly sure its tà an fear ag iarradh bia. Teastaìonn bia ò fear means food is needed off a man


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BardAaron

I put "tà fear uaidh bia." Why is that not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

The construction is "Teastaíonn [something] ó [someone]", or "Tá [something] ó [someone]".

What you wrote would translate something like "He wants a man, food."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/colettedil1

Teastaionn fear bia seems to me to be a better translation . 'O fhear' translates of man


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1230

Teastaionn fear bia doesn't mean anything in Irish, but if it did, it would be closer to "food-man is wanted" than "a man wants food".

The subject of the English verb "want" is the thing/person that is doing the wanting ("a man"). The subject of the Irish verb teastaigh is the thing that is wanted ("food", in this case).

ó fhear generally means "from a man", but in this case it means "by a man". About the only time that ó would mean "of" is in a phrase like "out of" (ní raibh sé ó bhaol go fóill - "he wasn't out of danger yet"), though there are bound to be examples where "of" and "from" overlap enough in English, that ó could be interpreted as "of".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CMLindley

None of these lessons are making any sense. Prior to this lesson tá and teastaíonn were accepted seemingly interchangeably, but in this lesson, which ever verb I choose seems to be incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Codester3

I missed the answer, but the question reminded me of something else: GoT is back in two months! :)

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