https://www.duolingo.com/IMahananda

Basic question: A new word - what is Your way to push it into Your memory?

IMahananda
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Hello Duolingo fans, I am curious to know how do You bring a new word into Your memory? I begin and share my prominent very simple method: example "el paraguas - the umbrella" I visualize 1. the word "el paraguas" 2. the translation "the umbrella" 3. the objectform for 1 min. in my mind or at the wall, 4. I remember the pronounciation so sometimes I see in the mind "el paraguas" sometimes "umbrella" sometimes the umbrella form and the pronounciation, I switch within 1 min. quite often to exercize my memory to recall it repeatedly, this method work very good in my experience, especially using 1 min seems very effectiv, on the smartphone the screen shuts off after 1 min. so I recognize when 1 min. is over.

3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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Writing the word and definition in my notebook and saying it really make it stick in my brain.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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At this point I don't try to memorize a list of words. I find the word in sentences in order to memorize them. Memrise is great by the way for their many mnemonics. One of the coolest mnemonics I recently remembered is for caber. Can a bear fit into a cab? Let me know if you got that one. Other than that, I just try grab words from songs, film, noticias, etc. and I'll eventually learn or remember them from context. IMPORTANT: If I don't hear a word often enough, then it is not important enough to remember.

TIP paraguas is a fun word once I realized that it is para + agua = el paraguas

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davloose
davloose
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Tips just like that are what push words into my mind... I'm always looking for a connection back to what I know already. If you aren't listening to Complete Spanish by Language Transfer on youtube.. you are missing a great resource!

Lingots for the nice tip, paraguas is a word that was NOT well stuck in my mind!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wifeofbath3

I've just started that series, and it does indeed seem like a great resource. It reminds me of the book Madrigal's Magic Key to Spanish, which I started two or three weeks ago as a supplement to DL.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wifeofbath3

I look for cognates or for ways that the new word is related to a Latin-origin English word. (Latinate English words because I studied French in school many years ago and am learning Spanish with DL now.) Or I'll look for some reasoning behind the word, like the para + agua = el paraguas example vcel10 gave. I rarely do this intentionally; looking for connections is just part of how my mind works.

I always say a new word out loud. Something I think might be a little harder to remember I write down --by hand, on paper. Activating the body with speech and handwriting helps; I don't know why handwriting helps memory more than typing, but it does.

I like to make up sentences with new words or structures I've learned. If I can make a sentence that amuses me, I'll remember what's in it better. There are probably a lot of DL users who won't forget the Spanish for "bear", because "Tu oso bebe cerveza" made them smile.

For nouns that refer to everyday objects, it's also good to look around yourself sometimes and say to yourself, in your new language, "I see a computer, I see a wall, I see a door..." You can throw in adjectives too: "I see a green shirt, I see a lot of books, I see a tall woman..."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

I don't try to intentionally "memorize" a word because that seems to set up a mental block for me. I just use the word as often as possible, in as many sentences as possible. I learn best by picking up new words in some form of context, the more "real life" the better. Flashcards and mnemonics are worse than useless for me because they create mental blocks against the word. But picking apart the origin of a word if I can recognize it (para agua) and using it in a variety of sentences works: "Tengo un paraguas. Necesito un paraguas porque está lloviendo. Dónde está mi paraguas? Dónde puedo comprar un paraguas? Quiero un paraguas naranjo. Se dice que nadie usa un paraguas en Portland, ¿me pregunto por qué?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/loolitay
loolitay
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This has worked for me 100% of the time. Don't try to 'memorize' words. Then, they're just random bits of information, floating around in your head, unattached to anything--and even if there's a mnemonic it's not usually connected to the actual meaning of the word. So you have to connect it to something you already know, so that it fits into the big picture. For example, 'abrir'--'to open'. Sounds like 'a breeze'. You open windows to let in the breeze.

Or, a better example, 'puerta'--'door'. Port. Things go in and out of a port.

Etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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In Spanish, which has many cognates, I often find an English synonym to the definition given that is somewhat cognate to the Spanish word. I also am reading novels on a Kindle, which has a Vocabulary Builder function that sets up flashcards for every word I look up. Just going through those daily or every other day has helped me improve my receptive vocabulary ( and to a certain extent, my productive, although that is coming more slowly.)

3 years ago
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