"Jag tvättar mina kläder."

Translation:I wash my clothes.

November 24, 2014

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo

Anyone else thought this would be "I twitter my clothes." ? :)

November 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexMoby

Yes me ^^

May 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AgnyLeo

I was searching for this comment :D

July 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/wyqtor

Yes! I was about to write the same thing.

September 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ninady1980

Are 'tvättar' and 'vatten' related, etymologically speaking? 'Tvättar' seems kind of like 'wetting'...

January 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Astronomy487

That's what I thought, too.

November 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Sorry guys - they're not related. :)

December 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ritamichele

How do you pronounce tvättar?

February 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Wurstobier

Exactly the way it is spelled. ä is fairly close to "a" in "apple" (in some english dialects)

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Fekkezaum

To me the "ä" in the audio sounds more like an English "e" as in "egg"

May 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

It depends on dialect, although yours is a better general approximation.

May 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Aebleskiver59

The A in apple does not sounds like the Ä in tvättar.

August 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/trielt

in some English dialects

January 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/FlorisR9

It's very close though

February 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kriegela

My first guess for 'tvätter' was "cleaning" instead of "washing". What's the difference in nuance and what would be a correct translation for "cleaning"?

November 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

Cleaning would rather translate to städa, as in tidying up and the like. However, there is definitely some cleaning in tvätta too, but usually it has to do with water somewhere.

November 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick

It must be Monday...

February 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/dajiang

Is it also ok to say"Jag tvättar sina kläder"?

December 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/John_Swede

Sina/sitt Is a construct I have only seen in the Nordic languages. It is a reflexive pronoun that reflects back the third person (sing or plur) , just as Zmrzlina points out below. What does this mean then? I'll give you an example:

Han tvättar sina kläder - His is washing his clothes (his own ones) Han tvättar hans kläder - He is washing his clothes (someone else's)

We don't have this in 1st or 2nd person.

/John

December 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

They have something very similar in Slavic languages. In Russian, it's свой, svoj. (then declined in all genders and cases). In Russian though, свой can refer back to the first person too. It's optional to use it for 1st person, but necessary in the 3rd.

December 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/rudensragana

Baltic languages as well, and it's not really optional in sentences like this. (As far as I know, it's actually necessary in Russian 1st and 2nd person also, but I could be wrong.)

March 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/TimK77777

I don't understand this "optional/necessary" business. свой literally means "one's own", which is not the same as just "one's" of the regular possessives

April 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Thank you! I feel all of my explanations in this thread are a bit rambling … 
You're correct, it is obligatory to use the reflexive possessives for the third person in Swedish. If you say Han hittade sin bok, he found his own book, but as soon as you say Han hittade hans bok, the book he found cannot be his own, it has to belong to some other male.

This system is a bit weak in some places and you can definitely hear native speakers make mistakes, but it's still safe to talk about right and wrong here, although it may well be that the system will look different in fifty years time.

April 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

At least my teachers used to tell me that it isn't wrong to say я взял мое [whatever], it's just that it puts a certain special stress on the whatever being 'mine'. Which means that using свой in that case is not obligatory. While with her or him it's obligatory or meaning changes into the thing belonging to someone else. Например можно сказать Я нашел мою книгу, а не твою.

April 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TimK77777

For some reason I can't reply to Arnauti's post below (no Reply link), so replying here: You're correct, and your explanation is very good (although I would put your example after the first sentence since it illustrates what you said in the beginning). Now back to Swedish: is it obligatory to use reflexive possessives in Swedish?

April 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TimK77777

свой can refer back to 2nd person too, both singular and plural

April 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

sure, my point is that sin cannot point back to the first person in Swedish. Nor to the second. Just the third.

April 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ViArSkoldpaddor

It is quite probably related to the other "reflexive particle" (sig - not sure if you would classify this as a pronoun) which also exists in German (sich - his/her/it/them-self) and behaves the same way in that the only other forms are myself (mich) and yourself (dich).

January 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

No, sina refers back to third person.

December 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Rhythmialex

Is it correct to say Jag tvätta mitt barn. and Jag tvätta mig.? Thanks.

December 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

If you change the verb to the present form: Jag tvättar mitt barn. and Jag tvättar mig.

December 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Rhythmialex

Oops, I forgot to conjugate the verb. Tack så mycket!

December 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Fekkezaum

Why "mina" and not "min"?

May 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Fekkezaum

Oh, mina is plural, min is singluar. Got it.

May 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/NatalieBoa3

Is clothing always plural in Swedish?

July 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Yes, we use another word for the singular - klädesplagg.

July 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Augustus4m

how is ' i am washing my dresses' wrong ?

February 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

kläder means "clothes" - you want klänningar for "dresses".

February 27, 2019
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