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"Pojken dricker sitt te."

Translation:The boy drinks his tea.

3 years ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rainbowchecker

We've got the same thing in Polish, too. "Swój", "swoja", swoje" works the same way as "sin", "sitt", "sina". It's nice to see some other language has got it, too. :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tashds
tashds
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It is also the same in Russian! Yet I managed to get this sentence wrong :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arx
Arx
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The same in Slovak - svoj, svoju, svoje. The difference is, that the suffix changes with respect to the gender of the noun that follows, which is not the case here - "en" and "ett" words are not divided by gender.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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It does change with respect to gender in Swedish –  en and ett are the two different genders we have, and the suffix changes depending on which gender it is – sin for en words, sitt for ett words. (plural is sina for both).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arx
Arx
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Wait, so "en" words are masculine and "ett" words are feminine? Or the other way around? Because that's what it's like in Slovak - for example "žena" (woman, wife) is feminine as well as "káva" (coffee), and you'd say "Miluje svoju ženu" and "Miluje svoju kávu" (He loves his wife, he loves his coffee). Is this principle the same in Swedish? Is "ett kaffe" a feminine noun?

Also, Slovak language (and I'd guess Polish and Russian too, though I'm not sure) has the third neutral gender, e.g. "mesto" (city) is neutral.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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No, en words are common gender and ett words are neuter. We don't have masculine and feminine, those merged into common gender historically.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MilesNilges
MilesNilges
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Also to a certain degree in French as well, son, sa, ses.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paragonium
Paragonium
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Yeeeeeah boyyyyyy, I was thinking the same thing :D

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caian_Caramori
Caian_Caramori
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Could it be "Pojken dricker hans te"??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rhblake
rhblake
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Yes - but only if the boy is drinking someone else's tea. Why? Because of reflexive possessive pronouns! :D

"The boy drinks his tea" is ambiguous. Is he drinking his own tea, or some other male person's tea?

Swedish doesn't have this ambiguity. The sentence can be translated to either "Pojken dricker sitt te" or "Pojken dricker hans te" depending on whose tea he's drinking.

Unfortunately even many native speakers make the mistake of writing hans/hennes when they mean sitt (or sin). And when there are multiple subjects in a sentence it can actually get tricky. But that also means you probably shouldn't worry too much about it while taking the first steps learning the language.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caian_Caramori
Caian_Caramori
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Got it, thank you very much :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/myrr2

are you Swedish ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bmb1988
bmb1988
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pojken dricker hans te. does it means the boy drinks someone's else tea?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thorr18
thorr18
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"Pojken dricker hans te" would mean the boy is drinking another boy's tea.
"Pojken dricker hennes te" when he is drinking a girl's tea.
"Pojken dricker deras te" if the tea he is drinking belongs to more than one person (but not to the speaker)
"Pojken dricker sitt te" means the tea belongs to the boy.
"Pojken dricker sina teer" if the teas belong to the boy and he's drinking more than one.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bmb1988
bmb1988
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Tack så mycket

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Giota306254

I think "sina" is wrong. Maybe you mean "deras". A little help from a MOD here please?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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You are correct: it should be deras.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Giota306254

tack så mycket!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thorr18
thorr18
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A few years later, lol. I've edited it.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smutsigcochon

So what "The boy drinks HER [a second person's] tea." would sound like?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rhblake
rhblake
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"Pojken dricker hennes te."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shiraz668

What if i wanted to say " the boy driks her tea" ie someone's else tea??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arx
Arx
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Pojken dricker hennes te.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toto216499

what is the difference between sin and sina all are ( his )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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  • sin = singular
  • sina = plural
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/agysbadr

How do you know it's dricker (is drinking) instead of dricker (drinks)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Swedish doesn't have a continuous tense, so there's no difference between "is drinking" and "drinks" - they're both dricker. You can translate to either one throughout the course, and if you ever need to distinguish between them in a real-life situation, you can derive it contextually.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeoNas25

we don't have this in portuguese! Somebody can explain me it changed?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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sin or sitt basically means "his/her own". Hence:

  • pojken dricker hans te = the boy drinks his tea, where "his" refers to somebody else
  • pojken dricker sitt te = the boy drinks his tea, where "his" refers to himself
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kyera2Toasty

Okay, so then can someone please explain common gender and neuter to me?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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  • common gender = en-words
  • neuter gender = ett-words

These are just grammatical labels at this point, and their names don't really say anything about their properties nowadays.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wanieni

It's the same in Latin! "Suus", "sua", "suum" and "eius" work almost the same!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaniPeepisu

The way I hear it, 'te' is pronounced as 'tee-eh.' Is that the correct way to pronounce it or am I just hearing it wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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There can be a slight aspiration when you stop the e sound, just like it can sound a bit like "tee-eh" in English. But it's not part of the correct pronunciation per se.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jannat208008

Can anyone explain the difference between sin and sitt?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

"Sin" is for en-words, "sitt" is for ett-words.

1 week ago