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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mgadda

Adjective placement

  • 1052

I recall there being a difference between une bonne femme and une femme bonne, one of which is perhaps crude or vulgar.

Does anyone know what those two phrases mean?

May 1, 2012

3 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaGueule

Actually both are sort of touchy in use. "Une bonne femme" is simply a familiar phrase designating a woman you don't know, but slightly contemptuous; je l'ai vu au bar mardi soir, il buvait de la bière avec une bonne femme-I saw him at the bar on Tuesday night, he was drinking beer with some broad. Whereas "Une femme bonne" prods more at the idea of saying "she's a good lay and not worth much else". I don't recommend using either unless your intent is to be vulger.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

I would add that if you come in France, you will probably hear it like this : "Elle est bonne".

And also @LaGueule, I disagree that the word "bonne" as an adjective, means "she's a good lay and not worth much else". It is indeed vulgar, but it only means : "She has a really nice body/face (or both)". It doesn't say anything whether she is worth something else than getting laid with or not.

Please correct me if I misunderstood your point.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaGueule

I probably should have mentioned that "Elle est bonne" is preferred, so thank you for that, and no @Arjofocolovi, i didn't mean it as a literal translation, more of an implication. I'm aware of it's real meaning, but with language and added attitude, often a particular sentiment is carried with a phrase when used in only specific cases.

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