"Vi går på bio."

Translation:We go to the movie theater.

November 25, 2014

20 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anrui
Mod
  • 20

Note that "We walk to the cinema" is wrong in this case since "Gå på bio" is a fixed epression in Swedish meaning "Go to the cinema" If you want to say that you walk to the cinema you'd have to change the preposition to "till".

I.e. "Vi går till bion" - "We walk to the cinema"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuoTaffer

What makes "cinema (bio)" here definite? Why "the cinema" over "a cinema"? Tack.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

It’s just a fixed expression, Swedish says ”gå på bio” just as English says ”go to the cinema”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HannuKulju

Why isn't it 'bion' when the translation was 'the cinema'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

I answered the same question above. English sometimes prefers the definite form where Swedish prefers the indefinite form and vice versa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuoTaffer

Is there anyway to say something like "You just have to go to a cinema" then? Or is it forever tied with "the".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

I’d use ”till en bio”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

British English also has a few similar oddities, such as "go to university" or "go to hospital."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Wait, don't you say go to university in US English? What do you say instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dfpeterson

We're more likely to say "college" than "university" in that circumstance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yasmin.m23

We do say that phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kim197311

We usually say we are going to college, even if university is part of the name of the school. For example, John is off to college. He is going to Washington State University.

I think the salient point ior this thread is that in America we will say that we are going to THE hospital, not to hospital.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jinguist

Do typo alerts work on listening exercises? I misheard, and wrote "vi går på bil". It was marked correct, with no typo warning. Duo admins - if typos are accepted with no warning in this kind of exercise (?), it really doesn't help the learning process!


[deactivated user]

    So, where does "bio" come from, etymologically?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/craigchardy

    It's short for "biograf," which is a picture or movie house.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luis020115

    Would the sentence "Vi åker på bio" be correct, meaning that we go to the cinema by train, car, etc? Tack!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

    It's something you might hear sometimes, but gå på bio is the set expression and åka på bio doesn't really sound as good.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joshua118516

    Shouldnt it be "vi går på bioN" if you want me to translate it that way?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

    gå på bio is a set expression meaning 'go to the cinema [and see a movie]'. It's like gå på bio is almost a verb in itself.
    If you walk to a specific movie theater, that is går till bion 'walk to the cinema'.

    We use the noun without an article like in the first sentence in some cases in Swedish where you prefer to have an article in English. For instance we can say either köpa bil or köpa en bil to mean 'buy a car'. The first version of the sentence expresses the action more in general, with no focus on the specific car. There are some more examples in this thread: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/5824774


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kim197311

    In my part of the US, "cinema" has an artsy connotation. American English uses "movies" rather than cinema. I recommend that be the default translation for bio.

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