"Ett täcke och en kudde"

Translation:A duvet and a pillow

November 25, 2014

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DuoTaffer

Sort of an odd question but does anyone know the origin of the word "kudde"? I don't know why but the word is so adorable and fluffy and I want to hug it. It reminds me of cuddly and I'm sure they share the same ancestor.

(Googling for origins of Swedish words is actually pretty hard, maybe because I google in English? Or maybe it's not a well documented area?)

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/rhblake

There's quite a bit of documentation actually: the Swedish Academy has been working on "Svenska Akademiens Ordbok" (SAOB) since sometime in the 1800s. It's a historical dictionary documenting the Swedish language from 1521 to now. Like the Oxford English Dictionary, basically. It's available for free online: http://www.saob.se/

They've currently worked all the way from A to VEDERSYN.

(Not to be confused with "Svenska Akademiens ordlista" (SAOL), the regularly updated "definitive" glossary that people often use as a reference, also available for free online: http://www.svenskaakademien.se/ordlista)

So if you go to SAOB and search for kudde, one of the things you'll find is

"[sv. dial. kudde, ärtskida; jfr ä. dan. o. nor. dial. kodde, isl. kodde, kudde; jfr äv. mnt. kodde, kudde, gris, meng. codde, ärtskida, ävensom sv. dial. kudd, liten pojke, liten person; eg. identiskt med KODD o. besläktat med KOTTE o. KUT]"

Translated it would be read as something like:

"[Swedish dialectal kudde, ärtskida ("pea pod"); compare older Danish and Norwegian dialects kodde, Icelandic kodde, kudde; compare also Middle Low German kodde, kudde, pig, Middle English codde, pea pod, also Swedish dialectal kudd, small boy, small person; in fact identical to KODD and related to KOTTE and KUT]"

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/DuoTaffer

Wow great! Thanks!

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/UKCynthiaR

What a FABULOUS set of references. Deep bow for these.

August 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/theredcebuano

Searching in Wiktionary seems to be a great option, though seeing as this was a year ago, the database might not have some words yet. Anyway, the word comes from Proto-Germanic *kuddô, which means bag

June 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kiteo

SAOB seems to say kudde is related to “cut” words?

August 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/draugur_ulv

Is there any great difference between a quilt, duvet, blanket and a cover? I Googled, and, in fact, what shows up when you Google for täcke is more of a duvet/cover rather than a quilt (I didn't even know this word until today) My point is, if there's no vital difference, why not use more common words?

December 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Snapdragonfly

I think maybe that depends on your dialect of English; I lived in Australia for a while and they very often used "quilt" for what I (in US English) would call a "bedspread" or "comforter". For me, "quilt" is a very specific term for the sort of blanket your granny sews together out of squares of cloth scraps, or at least it was until I grew accustomed to the other usage too.

I haven't looked into it any further, but I know Oz English can still resemble UK English in a lot of ways, so it's possible that's UK usage as well? (though an actual UK speaker would have to clear that up).

December 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/dariussavory

I've never heard of a comforter. In the UK we say quilt or duvet interchangeably.

May 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/kiteo

Australian; I use quilt for the big soft fluffy white thing that needs a cover. Doona is used here too. Have not heard duvet or comforter used here (yet); the latter sounds v. US to me, the former I probably just haven’t encountered.

Blanket might be used colloquially for the above but usually means the thinner woollen thing.

August 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick

When I lived in NZ, they used "duvet" or "duvet cover" for what I would call a comforter. I don't remember hearing "quilt" there.

March 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/skinnybutt

Honestly, I probably use and hear 'doona' more than anything else, but quilt is fairly accepted too. I rarely hear the word duvet, definitely not much of an Australian word.

A quick Google says doona was a brand name which overtook duvet as the word we use. Apparently it's based off the Danish 'dyne', so that's nice and circular.

August 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Snapdragonfly

How could I have forgotten about doona?! I love that word. :)

August 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis

Good explanation of quilt (for most North Americans) There's also a verb, to quilt, which means the process of making a quilt, or of sewing lines across two pieces of fabric with something in between for warmth or thickness. blanket is thinner, cover would be something you put on a bed during the day, or on a couch or chair to protect it from spills or pet hair. I didn't know what a duvet was until I visited England, to me it's like a very thick quilt, made of a single piece of fabric, and tied, rather than "quilted"together - or, a comforter.

December 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ahbeetay5

I'm in Canada and we say comforter. "I sleep with a thin sheet, and a comforter."

January 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiDressager

For me (a new Zealander living in the US now):

Quilt = the thin blanket generally sewn from squares of cotton (but can just be a thin cotton blanket also). Typically more suitable for summer temperatures.

Duvet = the plain white blanket traditionally filled with goose down (but often with polyester for cheaper modern versions) that goes inside a duvet cover. ie requires a cover.

Comforter = the thick blanket - often polyester filled - which is similar to a duvet but has it's own covering and does not require a duvet cover. More an American concept to be honest.

Doona = the american word for duvet that can also be used for comforter

Bedspread = a patterned blanket that goes on top of other blankets/bedclothes. Much like the fancy cover on hotel beds that is more for appearances that function.

Blanket = the blanket term for all of the above (see what I did there!!!) plus also includes woollen blankets and other styles that don't really fit into the above.

But from what I can see other cultures use these words more interchangeably than NZers do...

February 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JoakimEk

With these explanations it would be translated to:

quilt = lapptäcke (lit. patch ...), duvet = täcke or also duntäcke when filled with goose down, comforter = ?, bedspread = överkast (lit. throw-over), blanket = filt (the wool things etc, not in general for all the above).

"Täcke" is also used as suffix in e.g. "snötäcke" for a cover/blanket of snow outside.

November 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kjjg1

I'm from NZ too and your explanation sounds exactly right to me also.

May 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JosephCapo1

I do not understand the difference between a duvet and a blanket...is this a european thing?

May 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

There's considerable regional difference in the English-speaking world. However, in general, this is a duvet:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duvet#/media/File:White-duvet.jpg

And this is a blanket:

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1586/6933/products/Black-cream-plaid-wool-blanket-1_grande.jpg?v=1492485883

May 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Reuel_Ramos

I never heard 'duvet' before. That's learning two by the price of one :)

February 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kiteo

I looked up the etymology of täcke too; it appears to mean “cover” more broadly and is related to tak, roof. It also appears to be related to English deck. If I am wrong, please correct me.

August 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Close - that's the origin of the verb täcka, from which täcke is derived.

August 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/porpsi

i previously learned that kudde means cushion and huvudkudde (head cushion) means pillow.. is this incorrect?

August 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Anrui

I would never use "huvudkudde" unless I wanted to be extremely clear. Usually I'd just go for "kudde" both for cushions and pillows.

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Damirmmmm

What about "dämpa"? Which one is used more often??

January 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiDressager

att dämpa is a verb meaning to reduce or moderate the impact of something. (Almost literally to "dampen" in terms of sound or blow!) I am guessing that the confusion arose because you got the translation to English as “cushion” - the verb form of the word. Eg I tried to cushion the blow.

January 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/jelee87

From my experience living in Sweden, they just use 'kudde' for both- I suspect 'huvudkudde' would only be used when you need to draw a distinction between the two.

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/porpsi

Thx for the clarification

October 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Texan-Paul

I only started using the word duvet after I immigrated to Texas. Theretofore, a quilt was a comforter made of scraps.

November 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/lostdrewid

Would someone be so kind as to reply to this comment? Anyone at all will do :) I'm on mobile currently and there are numerous comments here that deserve lingots, as well as some I'd like to take the time to grok later. {I'll delete the comment afterwards since it adds nothing to the discussion, I'm just worried I'll never come across it on my own on my laptop since I rarely do lessons there.}

August 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiDressager

Hej hej! Här är din kommentar! :)

August 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Phowbow

Now I'm Canadian, I have NEVER heard the word duvet...?! For me it's a blanket. From what century have you taken this??

March 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiDressager

Read through the above comments. The word duvet is in broad usage all around the rest of the world.

March 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Budapoo

Duvet?

September 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Yes?

September 7, 2017
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