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  5. "Dagarna kommer och går."

"Dagarna kommer och går."

Translation:The days come and go.

November 25, 2014

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thorr18

...men mina känslor för dig är för evigt!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jesse933831

Forever from PapaRoach


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonnySmooth

Could åker be used here instead of går?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lord_zulo

No, 'åker' is mainly used for transportation of some kind. Gå/går is used in several ways, examples:

"Tiden går - The time passes"

"Motorn går - The engine runs"

"Mannen går - The man walks"

"Det går bra - It will work"

There are exceptions and ofddities as usual, this usage is a bit tricky to fully grasp i guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatrinaTheLamia

Ah... the suggestions suggest that går refers to leaving by foot... and I was about to ask...

... but if it turns out it is more generic that that... alright, thankies!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maxwrobinson

I don't think so because åker implies it drives or walks or uses some method of traveling. but I'm no expert so a second opinion would be nice!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheresaStr17

I think of går as "going under their own power" if that helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JYH6UtXB

Today is month three of sheltering-in-place and, yep(!), this sure does still resonate...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoroTanuki

och is barely audible here, is that how it's supposed to be read?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim801

In almost all Swedish dialects "Och" is not fully pronounced. It becomes more like "Dagarna kommer O går"...When spoken fast, it is easy to miss. You might hear the same phenomenon in the word "Det" that means "It". The T is not always pronounced, so it sounds like "De" which means "They".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goim

Please keep in mind that "De" is pronounced dom and the text-to-speech software is making a mistake!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/schneeofschnee

I think they fixed it, it says "Dom" now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yeah, the above comments are four years old, and the TTS was exchanged after that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RAlberdi

Maybe that's why they pronounce "De" as "dom": to avoid confusion ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m.aster

Same with "är" it seems. (And when it's "Det är" it just sounds like "De" with a little flair at the end.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim801

Yes, the "är" is usually simplifed to a just "é" or "ä" depending which dialect. It is totally okey to speak like that because most people speak like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gibbano

"I rummet kvinnorna kommer och går, de pratar på Michelangelo" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoakimEk

"Kvinnorna i rummet de komma och de gå, pratande om Michelangelo" (T.S.Elliot) The use of both "de" and specifying "kvinnorna" is common in poetry/lyrics but not in normal use, and in general the sentence has a poetic style. The last part with "prataNDE" is similar to the English talkING-form, but gramatically not the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahferroin7

Is this an idiom in Swedish? I'm curious because while the sentiment is easily understood from a literal translation, even the Swedish seems a bit 'out there' to me (let alone the English).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4oYBIxtO

Yes it is an idiom

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