1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Irish
  4. >
  5. "Itheann tú do dhinnéar linn."

"Itheann do dhinnéar linn."

Translation:You eat your dinner with us.

November 25, 2014

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyLAnders1

Does anyone else hear "itheann tú dee henneer linn"? I know the words run together sometimes but I really didn't get that one. Even after I knew the answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FeargalMcGovern

does that mean "itheann an madra do dhinnéar linn" = "the dog eats you dinner with us"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolMicheal

Can this be a command or is just a statement?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

This is a statement. The command would be Ith(igí) do dhinnéar linn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolMicheal

Thanks, go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deserttitan

I had been wondering if Irish had command forms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leniminimineymoe

So does linn means with us' and pool'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyLAnders1

Yes. Apparently it also means a space of time. And "le linn" means "because of" - but I haven't seen it used either of those ways, yet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deasun

"Eat your dinner with us" has the same meaning in English and is the usual way of expressing this, but is reported as incorrect??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rewjeo
  • 2242

This is not a command, it's a statement of fact. The command form, according to galaxyrocker above, is ith(igi) do dhinnéar linn and has something to do with the verbal noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuergenZirak

The "o" in "do" sounds very weak to me, and more like an "i". Is that because it glides into the following "yi" sound of dhinnéar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FoxyAuroraBat

I've seen the word "ithe" used for present tense form, like in "Tá tú ag ithe". What merits the application of that form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wengusflengus

itheann tú > you eat

tá tú ag ithe > you are eating


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juniper_Jaye

Would it work if you took out the "your"? So "You eat dinner with us" (I think this was covered previously but can't remember)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

No, it wouldn't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joshuaburrow

Why does linn also mean pool?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AllieC490376

Because they were originally two different words in Old Irish, but have changed since then and sound the same today.

The word linn meaning "lake" was lind in Old Irish.

https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Celtic/lindom

And linn in Old Irish was li(u)nn or le(i)nn. (And is leinn in Modern Scots Gàidhlig)

https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/la#Old_Irish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/H66p6e

Why does 'mine' also mean a hole in the ground? Because words have multiple meanings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nowwheresmynut

how would i say "you dine with us"? is it the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jstamper

Why is it completely wrong if you leave the h out of Dhinnear?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyLAnders1

Because lenition is triggered by "do" when it is followed by a word that begins with a consonant. When do is followed by a word beginning with a vowel you add an apostrophe. So "your orange" would be "d'oraiste"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnmorris527679

Dont see what my mistake was here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

This is a user-to-user forum. The people reading your comment have no idea what you submitted, and therefore we have no way of helping you to figure out what your mistake was.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Finbarr11

Why is " Eat your dinner with us" not OK?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

"Eat your dinner with us" is an order, using the Imperative, or modh ordaitheach in Irish:
Ith do dhinnéar linn

Note that there aren't any pronouns ("you" or or sibh) in either the English or the Irish in the imperative/modh ordaitheach. The plural version in Irish is Ithigí bhur ndinnéar linn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Finbarr11

Go raibh maith agat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneNoone1

Can some help explain when /why either is used. Itheann tú do dinnéar linn. Itheann tú bhur ndinnéar linn. GRMA


[deactivated user]

    You don't say "Itheann tú do dinnéar linn" because do causes lenition - do dhinnéar.

    You don't say "Itheann tú bhur ndinnéar linn" because is singular "you" but bhur is plural "your".

    You say Itheann tú do dhinnéar linn when talking to just 1 person and Itheann sibh bhur ndinnéar linn when talking to two or more people.

    Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.