"Les parents sont gênés."

Translation:The parents are embarrassed.

3 years ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Neowarex

It is odd that gênés means upset or embarassed but shy isn't accepted as it means shy in French (at least in Québec). Could someone clarify ? Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joeTatt1
joeTatt1
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In English one translation of gêné is ill at ease or self conscious. If you are an introverted person with high trait neuroticism who feels uncomfortable in the company of strangers or groups of people in general this would make you shy. Interestingly Larousse online also says that au Canada gêner = intimider.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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"Shy" = FR "timide". "Upset" has different meanings: usually "bothered". Explore a couple of good dictionaries to see "gêné" used in a sentence.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/youssefnlse
youssefnlse
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Why can't it mean 'The parents are ashamed'? Could anyone tell me the difference between embarrassed and ashamed in English and why gêné can not be applied to 'ashamed'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeff4419

Embarrassment can be caused by undesired or excessive attention (good or bad), and shame comes from an acknowledgement of wrongdoing. Pride and shame are antonyms, but one could be proud and embarrassed at the same time: http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2013/06/04/viral-video-mishap-during-star-spangled-banner/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VincentOostelbos
VincentOostelbos
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That is true. So is it indeed the case that « gêné » refers only to embarrassment, and not to shame, in the senses that you described?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Summerstor5

Shame isn't solely from "wrong doing". It can also be a sudden feeling of inadequacy or of being less than you normally feel. The colloquialism is to "feel small".

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LBoksha
LBoksha
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I also got burned by "The parents are ashamed" on my first try; I think the difference is gêné is a lot less strong. However, I'd also like to hear this from a native French speaker.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Khaur
Khaur
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Your guess is right. Shame is a lot stronger. To be ashamed would be avoir honte in French.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devbanana

The pronunciation here of gênés sounds like “jenn-EE”. Should the pronunciation be more like “jenn-AY” because of the é?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidAlbro
DavidAlbro
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Yes. I looked it up on Forvo and listened to a French speaker. It should be "ay". Duolingo is really useful, it's the best language tool I've seen, but these multiple little pronunciation errors are irksome.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruby360784

My parents sure are! :-)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/c.foulkes

couldn't this be "The parents are worried" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Khaur
Khaur
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No, that would rather be inquiets. Gênés refers to embarrassment/uneasiness or (light) impediments.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/asherdc

How would "parents are embarrassing" differ as a translation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew48

''Les parents sont gênants," if I'm not mistaken.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DimitrisKane

Is genes a participle ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew48

In this particular sentence it is an adjective, but it was originally (and still is) a past participle, yes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DimitrisKane

Thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugarry77

what is the difference between angry and annoyed?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jac228479

Annoyed = embarrassed? Not right

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boulangist

Does sont genes mean both "embarrassed" and "annoyed"? What is the most direct translation?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jocelyne64

who makes up these rules. I can understand most explanations, but some are ridiculous. Since when does "gênés" mean embarrassed? In all my fifty plus years, the definition has always been "shy"

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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"Gêné" has always meant embarrassed, but it is also used sometimes to mean shy (more often "timide") or ashamed (more often "avoir honte"). There are a number of other uses, too: bothered, self-conscious, awkward, confined.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vamagman

Is this present tense? In that case wouldn't //plural parents// mean making it "genent"?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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"Gênés" is not a verb in this sentence. It is a past participle playing the part of an adjective.

2 months ago
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