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  5. "De gick till stranden."

"De gick till stranden."

Translation:They went to the beach.

November 25, 2014

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rach_jules

So 'gick' is past tense of 'går'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

Yes, it is a strong/irregular verb:
att gå - jag går - jag gick -jag har gått


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

The new TTS makes the "De" sound like /dom/ to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Yes, that's how it should sound, the old one was wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sgnail

Hooray för bättre uttalet!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

Åh okej. Tack så mycket.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nebelung1

"De" and "dem" are pronounced like /dom/ in most dialects as well as in rikssvenska (this is why many Swedes confuse them when writing).

In some dialects in northern Sweden and in Finland (finlandssvenska) you pronounce those two words just like you read them (/dɛ/ and /dɛm/)

Sometimes /dɛ/ and /dɛm/ also appear in formal speech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

Text-to-speech. The computer-generated voice that pronounces all the sentences in most Duolingo courses, except Irish and perhaps now there are others.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

Esperanto is another one with a real voice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tjasonham

Mmmm, I'm sure this has been answered before, but when do you use går/gick vs åker/åkte?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

"Gå" normally means walk and "åka" normally means go (by vehicle).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tjasonham

tack~ I think I subconsciously associated gå with go and åka with walk because they sound so similar! hahaha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heidijan

Og hva med "drog"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

It can mean 'went to' (or more 'left for' i.e. with a focus more on the leaving part of the movement) but it's pretty slangy. I have a feeling it's less slangy in both Danish and Norwegian, though I could totally be wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valdemarsda

It's not a slang word in Norwegian - just a regular old verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Thanks for confirming!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knoxienne

Is the "g" in gick pronounced like the French "j" or like a "y" in English? Need clarification. TIA


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

Does that mean if it is voiced or voiceless? I don't speak French, so that's why I ask. Normally, it's voiceless but within words/sentences you might hear a little buzzing :).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knoxienne

I'm sure I'll get it sooner or later. At first I was freaked out by the sk and some of the k sounds too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knoxienne

Okay, I did the exercise again and it definitely is unvoiced and sounds more like a "y" in English. But Spanish does that buzzing thing too with its y sound so it can sound like a j sometimes. It's just the way the human vocal structures are, I guess. Thank you, Helen! <3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knoxienne

In a way it sounds like the hard sh sound in pleasure, but then it also sounds like the y sound in your. Hard to pick it out! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/craigchardy

I'm hearing "stranden" being pronounced as "standen." What happened to the "r" sound? When it's pronounced slowly, the "r" sound is heard.

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