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"Is maith liom an Cháisc."

Translation:I like Easter.

3 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Fingolfin1346

An Cháisc is derived from Latin Pascha (from Greek Πάσχα Pascha) and shows a sound change from p to c which sometimes occurs in loanwords into Old Irish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/balbhan
balbhan
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I don't think that's quite right - Q-Celtic didn't change p to c.

Proto-Celtic is thought to have changed Proto-Indo-European p to an "f"-like sound, which was deleted, like how Latin faba became Spanish haba, so the ancestor of the surviving Celtic languages had no p sound.

So PIE ph₂tḗr >> PC ɸatīr >> Old Irish athir >> Modern Irish athair

P-Celtic languages got the p sound back by changing and to p and b. This leads to: PC makʷos >> Welsh mab (p is lenited to b in Welsh).

Q-Celtic merged and with k and g. makʷos would be expected to give -mach-, as c is lenited to ch in Irish. This means mac would come from a local makkʷos pronunciation. It also means Q-Celtic still had no p, so couldn't have changed p to c.

Early Irish that was still close to early Welsh, so speakers might have noticed Welsh p matched with their k. So Pasg was reshaped as Cáisc. It doesn't look like you can infer a general rule from this though - Padrig became Pádraig rather than Cádraig.

Even today, nearly all words with beginning with p in Irish are loanwords.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fingolfin1346

Thanks for correcting me. I didn’t express myself clearly enough and I’ve amended the post accordingly.

Yes, Indo-European p did not become Old Irish c. The p was often lost, as in the case of athair or mutated, I think, into a /b/ or /x/.

Where Old Irish borrowed words from Latin (sometimes via Welsh, or I guess Brittonic at the time) we do sometimes see a p > c change. I think this may be the case with Latin presbyter ‘priest’ > Old Irish cruimther ‘priest’ or planta ‘shoot, plant’ > cland ‘offspring’.

Not all loanwords show such a sound change e.g. Old Irish penn ‘pen’ from Latin penna ‘feather’. Patrick is an interesting case because Irish adopted the p spelling but I’m pretty sure you get something like Cothrige in some early texts. I’d have to double-check.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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No, it was correct. Often loanwords into OI would have their /p/s turned into a /k/. For instance, corcra (purple), cothraig (older form of 'patrick'), and a bunch of others were borrowed like this.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/balbhan
balbhan
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Yes, Fingolfin clarified that he meant that in his second comment, and edited his first one accordingly. Thanks though!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nukeqler
nukeqler
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I was thinking that there must be a cognate. Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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The 's' in 'Cháisc' should be slender.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/unafurtiva
unafurtiva
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I wasn't allowed "I love Easter". It's not really wrong, surely!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

"Is maith liom" is usually reserved for "I like", and stronger versions like "Is breá liom" and "Is aoibhinn liom" are used for "I love".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cobbleduff

I still love Easter, baby

3 weeks ago