"Den är borta!"

Translation:It is gone!

November 26, 2014

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JimNolt

Det regnar = It is raining. Why "den," not "det" in this sentence?

February 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

In this case den is not a formal subject, but a real pronoun referring to some object. With no context, we don't know what gender it is, so both work here.

February 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MesutS1

So "det är borta" would be perfectly fine too?

March 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Sorry for late answer, but yes, definitely.

May 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Clovisnox

So bort (away) and borta (gone) are two distinct adverbs?

October 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe

Yes, borta refers to things that are gone, lost, away, whereas bort is a more general adverb meaning away. The distinction goes back to Old Norse burt and burtu, interestingly.

October 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Clovisnox

Tack !

October 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DehPuh

in which way is borta an adverb?

November 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Lundgren8

Because it answers to the question ”where”, then it’s an ”adverb of place”.

November 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Laski-Julle

Why not "That is gone!"

January 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertChur

"That" generally refers to something that is present, so "that is gone" sounds a bit like a contradiction.

March 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PLLumsdaine

“That” in English can also refer back to a previous referent. “I don’t like this bike; can I have the one I used yesterday?” “No, that’s gone today.”

April 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidCarls11

Why doesn't "it is away" work?

June 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe

I guess because you wouldn't really say that in English, at least not with the same meaning as "it's gone."

June 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe

This is the first time in a while I couldn't hear the r at all. I know it's different in Swedish but this seems completely like "bota" or "botta" to me. Thankfully, it accepted my answer as a typo, but it really doesn't sound quite right.

May 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

borta actually sounds pretty good here. The present TTS isn't that good with r sounds generally, but here I think it sounds very natural. Compare with native speakers here: http://sv.forvo.com/search-sv/borta/

In Standard Swedish and most dialects, R melts together with consonants D, T, N, L and S to form what is sometimes called retroflex consonants (aka supradentals or postalveolars).

https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retroflex_konsonant
English Wikipedia has good articles on those, follow the links from the table here
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retroflex_consonant#Transcription

This one is about RT: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voiceless_retroflex_stop

May 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe

Interesting, thanks for the links and explanation.

May 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mutterholle

If "gone" is not an adv. in English, I think "bort" more like "weg" in German in its meaning. Den är borta = Es ist weg. In this German case it should also be an adv.

May 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/segonpin

could it be "It is over"? I tried and it was wrong...

June 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe

I think not. That would be det är över.

June 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Zamfir160900

How would you say "It is away"? Because "gone" means non-existent but "away" means somewhere else but not here.

June 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/trilby16

I thought it was "They are gone." Because de, den-- pronounced the same? And borta-- plural? Nej?

October 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Kim197311

Can borta mean gone in the sense of "all gone" as well as "gone away"?

November 8, 2018
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