"The man speaks Swedish, but not the woman."

Translation:Mannen talar svenska, men inte kvinnan.

3 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Mutusen
Mutusen
  • 17
  • 15
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 3
  • 11

My guess was "Mannen talar svenska men kvinnan inte." Why is this word order wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/friswing
friswing
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 21
  • 18
  • 17
  • 15
  • 1639

Here the woman is negated, the man speaks the language, not the woman, so 'inte' is put before the woman = 'inte kvinnan'. If this phrase had had a verb it would have been = "men kvinna talar inte svenska", here we negate the language she does not talk.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.aster
m.aster
  • 21
  • 9
  • 9
  • 4

So you can say "Mannen talar svenska men engelska inte"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/friswing
friswing
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 21
  • 18
  • 17
  • 15
  • 1639

No, we say: "Mannen talar svenska men INTE engelska" (not English), the language is negated by having 'inte' before the word negated.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/friswing
friswing
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 21
  • 18
  • 17
  • 15
  • 1639

BUT :-) if it is the verb that is negated, then 'inte' comes after: "Han talar inte" - He does not speak.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.aster
m.aster
  • 21
  • 9
  • 9
  • 4

I think I'm getting it!

How about:

I cook for the man, but not her (I don't cook food for her) - Jag lagar mat till mannen, men inte henne

I cook for the man, but not she (she doesn't cook for the man) - Jag lagar mat till mannen, men inte hon

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/friswing
friswing
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 21
  • 18
  • 17
  • 15
  • 1639

I would say: 1) "Jag lagar mat till mannen, men inte TILL henne. The 2nd phrase sounds akward, I would probably say: 2) "JAG lagar hans mat, INTE HON" (or "för HON gör det inte")

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stephebp
stephebp
  • 18
  • 11
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2

I learned German first, and think the Swedes must do it more like the English than them because I put it after too cause that is how you would say it in German!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/friswing
friswing
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 21
  • 18
  • 17
  • 15
  • 1639

Yes, Swedish wordorder is more like English, but not always. There are distinct rules in all the three languages, that differ.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stephebp
stephebp
  • 18
  • 11
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2

Of course. :P I just meant in this case specifically. Swedish and German share the V2 and English and Swedish share the SVO word-order. Overall I think so far I'd say that English and Swedish negate more similarly than do the other two pairs.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DansJahans

I wrote mannen talar svenska men inte kvinnan and duolingo doesn't accept and put ej insted of inte ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandi_e
Sandi_e
  • 25
  • 18
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 7

I also put men and duo put ej....why

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trilby16

"Ej"? No one's concerned about ej? I must have missed that day of school...

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SrMarien
SrMarien
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 4

When to use utand and when to use men?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/friswing
friswing
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 21
  • 18
  • 17
  • 15
  • 1639

But = men (starts a subordinate phrase, saying something that is opposed to the main phrase) 'Utan' = without. E.g. I never leave home without my cellphone = Jag går aldrig hemifrån utan min mobiltelefon.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucrezia-luna

in this case could "Jag går aldrig hemifrån utan min mobiltelefon" be literally traslated as "I never go away from home without my cellphone" ? Is hemifrån something like a composite word?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/friswing
friswing
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 21
  • 18
  • 17
  • 15
  • 1639

Yes, it sounds good. Hemifrån = Home+from (even though English is thinking it the other way around) = leaving home

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SchonBaume

Difference between 'men' and 'utan'?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ejsharpe

Why is pratar not correct is this instance? I though both pratar and talar translated as "to speak". Thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/friswing
friswing
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 21
  • 18
  • 17
  • 15
  • 1639

You would be understood of course, but it is a kind of 'false friend'; I believe English prefer 'speak' when it comes to knowledge of a language, Swedish prefer 'talar'. But when it comes to 'talk" (chatting), Swedish more often use 'pratar' or the colloquial 'snackar'. So I would say that 'talar' is a false friend of 'talk'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ejsharpe

Tack!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clinton230854

'Men' was not even among the answer choices.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dot-dot-dot

Why not pratar instead of talar, talar sounds so formal

4 months ago
Learn Swedish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.