https://www.duolingo.com/hellerm

Funny Language Memes

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Every language has some funny intricacy that people always notice and laugh about. Here are some memes that show the fun in languages and learning languages.

If I didn't know English that would drive me crazy!

This what cats must think whenever you meow at them. :D

I love doing this! My friends look at me and think how does he do this! and I just smile.

Why does English dew this!!!???

For those language geeks who just simply can't wrap their minds around the idea of not using proper English syntax.

Hope you enjoyed these. I know I did. Happy learning. :D

4 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
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linguist llama

And a bonus comic in honour of the new Star Wars teaser:

yoda

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
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A few more, got to spend that lunch time productively:

llama

llamaa

llamaaa

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
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Haha, nice ones!

Not quite a meme, but my new sister in law and I was laughing at this gif the other day. She's from Ecuador and visiting us in Norway at the moment. ;)

cat gif

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HunterWildVampsm

Yes, I bet she can relate

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hellerm
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Nice!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/S0R0USH
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Well... she did get accepted into a Dental School but her acting /modeling career made her a lot of money so she dropped the dental thing XD

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scarcerer
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You want ham in your hamburgers? I'm just glad no people from Hamburg are used in the making (I believe most European languages do this).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hellerm
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I don't think it would be very tasty! ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HunterWildVampsm

these are hilarious! Thanks so much you have brightened many peoples day :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hellerm
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I try. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/S0R0USH
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Hamburger comes from the German city "Hamburg" who are known for making that hamburger meat... Hence the name Hamburger.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
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For multilingual fun, one could look at cross-language buck-passing — e.g. a danish in Danish is a wienerbrød (“Vienna bread”). Sadly, the German language equivalent doesn’t point somewhere else in turn. I hope that others will suggest words with longer “blame chains”!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
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Who wouldn't want to be "blamed" for something so delicious?

Here's one for you: Cinnamon bun is skillingsbolle in Norwegian.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
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But neither “cinnamon bun” nor skillingsbolle is a homonym for a nationality, so there’s no chain to investigate. Another example: in Irish, Francach is “French” (the nationality rather than the language), and francach is “rat”. But the French word for “rat” is rat, not pointing somewhere else, so the chain breaks there.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
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Oh, I was just referring to your name. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wifeofbath3

I believe that the type of needlework Americans call "eyelet", the English call "French embroidery" and the French call "broderie anglaise."

I remember hearing long ago in school that syphilis was called by Elizabethan-era Englishmen "the French disease", whereas the French referred to it as the Italian disease (maladie italien?; My little French is very rusty.) I always wondered what the Italians called it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
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Wikipedia states that the Italians called it the “French disease” (perhaps mal francese? — my Italian is non-existent). Apparently there was a lot of neighbor blaming by peoples of many nations.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivanka_ps
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4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

From this Language Log post:

phonics

and this Swedish one

Translation, according to the original post:

"Daddy, how do you spell 'steam train'?"

"The way it sounds."

"Choo-choo-choo?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JJordan24
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I find the French sentence "Le singe mange une orange" hilarious because of the way it sounds when spoken.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hellerm
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Same, I repeated it about a hundred times a day for a week!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fallingleaf_271

LOL YES.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jayway223
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OMG. I love this post so much. :D

4 years ago
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