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  5. "¿Oíste a los pájaros?"

"¿Oíste a los pájaros?"

Translation:Did you hear the birds?

July 8, 2013

56 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DannyDannyDanny

Did you hear the word?

B-B-B-BIRD BIRD BIRD, BIRD IS THE WORD...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jude0808

Lol. Thanks for the study break. On the original, thats a pretty good exercise warmup.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielDayot

Papapa umamamaw papa umamaw xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kturowski

Is the "a" here a personal "a"? I thought personal "a"s were only used when referring to people, like "miro a ella" not to animals


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rspreng

Also to animals that you like, pets and cute things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geneven

I guess I can assume that these birds weren't vultures, then.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marytejedor

No, "a" is used to use with anything, almost don't matter that is it. Can be an animal or a person, even an objects. I am a spanish speaker, just in case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crisjordan22

well that`s not what it says in the grammar book


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spaceghost

Why isn't "Have you heard the birds?" acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Archonicable

I believe "Have you heard the birds?" would be "¿Has oído a las pájaros?"

When you "have done" something, you need to use the verb haber, which means "to have", but to have done something, not to possess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muyi31

However, Duolingo accepts "have you seen" for the doctor question. It's not consistent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alleexm

Yep, Archonicable is right. This section deals purely with pretérito indefinido tense (tú oíste = you heard). "You have heard" = "tú has oído," which is called the pretérito perfecto tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HolyT
  • 1917

That's the present perfect, conjugated using the present tense of haber.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alleexm

Yep, it's called the present perfect tense in English. But In Spanish it's called the pretérito perfecto [de indicativo.]

https://espanol.lingolia.com/es/gramatica/tiempos/preterito-perfecto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HolyT
  • 1917

¡Gracias! Tenga un lingot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jude0808

Why not, tú has oiste? Being that oído means ear, hearing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikBoyle

That would be "you have (you) heard", which isn't grammatical because you can't just jam two conjugated verbs together. In addition to that, you shouldn't be using 'haber' at all in a lesson about the preterite tense.

'Oído' is a noun meaning 'hearing' or 'ear'—as in the part inside that hears, which is distinguished from 'la oreja', the skin and cartilage on the outside of your head. But it also is the past participle of 'oír', the verb for 'to hear'. Like any past participle, it functions as a verb to form the perfect tenses and also as an adjective or adverb when not partnered with 'haber'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/territech

This was very helpful information that I had not yet learned. A lingot for you, ErikBoyle!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dementu

Exactly! I saw this in many sentences....but with different verbs... One example would be "Porque usted no me dijiste esta costa" if i write it ok and the only acceptable response was "Why did you not tell me this thing" rather than "Why did you not told me this thing"...it is annoying


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moramajama

"Porque usted no me dij[o] esta cosa?" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duggers8

Yeah! I wrote the same thing, and got it wrong too!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sRebeccaWo

yeah thats what i said and its basically the same thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luvlearning

Pajaros = "nasty piece of work" in the drop down hints. Ok ... someone native please explain! LOL


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whitec113

basically its like us calling someone an idiot haha. Thats used a lot in chile...well pájaron is...which is the same thing haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarethViejoLento

Is pajaron like casa / cason .... ie a 'big parrot' - --> idiot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrSasho

Damn, accidentally wrote ¨Did you hear the beards?¨ ^^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brandthacker

the beards, they wisper to me. They wisper things of darkness, things of razors. Of things that pasted and things that are to come. They wisper... MOSTACHE


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fdlatte

um. i mustache you a question


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Si_Robertson

The "a" is here just because it's talking about animals right? It's a personal "a" only for people and animals right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWang2017

Why is "a" in the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

Note, for you literalists, and decoders (you know who you are!), just in case you missed it, this sentence translates as, "You heard the birds?" And this is actually a good illustration of the way a Spanish native thinks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeEscocia

Unable to get a voice recognition despite numerous attempts at this one phrase. Is it me , my pronunciation or the combination of words that are failing me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/territech

I gave up on voice recognition. I speak very clearly in English; yet when I tried voice-to-text on my iPhone I spent more time correcting the mistakes than it would have taken to write the text. Therefore, I wasn't surprised when my crude Spanish was barely recognized by my device. Why? I assume that the quality of the microphone in my device, along with the imperfections in the voice recognition software technology, result in limitations in the ability of the computer to decipher my unpracticed Spanish. To fine-tune my Spanish pronunciation, I find it more effective to work with a live human native Spanish speaker, who understands my Spanish, even though my computer cannot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/runninbear

How would you say 'did he hear the birds?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thekatmorgan

¿oyó a los pajaros?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mashaunix

man every sentence on this lesson is like straight out of a poem


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samrlevitt

This went through my mind in a British accent. "Did ya' 'ere th' bi'ds?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MispaJah

How do you say 'did you hear the sound'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HotFudgeMonday

I had the version where I had to listen to the speaker and write what they wrote. I wrote "Oyiste a las pajaros" and it counted it correct, only correcting me on the missing accent on "pájaros."

Does that mean "oyiste" is an acceptable spelling? Or did Duo just miss that one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katissuper

From using dueling it seems if you spell something slightly wrong it doesn't count it "wrong" but it is not an acceptable spelling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeEscocia

what is clutter as opposed to a request for help? My original question? clutter? this is not a mistake but a genuine request for help , AFTER a long search for an answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobChristiansen

oiste= you hear - oeste= west


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreaja69

oiste = you heard (past)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marytejedor

why not right: "did you hear to the birds"? What happen with the "to" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreaja69

The addition of 'a' is specifically used in the Spanish language, but is not required in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daviesmkareee

so there is no difference between listen and hear in spanish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tshegofats18

When is it listen vs hear? Or is the meaning interchangeable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gary572280

The examples for oiste translate to "HEARD"-- have you heard the birds. So, if "did you hear" is correct, then that choice should be listed in the examples under oiste, shouldn't it??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angry_Mongoose

Really Dou? You made me get it wrong cuz I forgot the 'the'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/River302395

"you heard the bids?" is not a question


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreaja69

'Birds'. It is a question if you put an upward inflexion at the end of the sentence when speaking it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SergeantChicken7

Would "Have you heard the birds" worked as well? I would think so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lochinvar27

How is "have you heard the birds" a wrong translation? can someone explain? thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gazelt

My grammar book says the personal "a" is used for people and for animals when they are pets or considered close friends or part of family. I'm not sure "birds" in general qualifies. I don't think this particular sentence is correct with the "a" included.

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