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  5. "An bhfuil mac tíre sa ghort?"

"An bhfuil mac tíre sa ghort?"

Translation:Is there a wolf in the field?

November 29, 2014

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pisan_de_Paris

"mac tire"--does that literally mean that a wolf is a "son of the country", or something like that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CianMacOistigin

Yeah, thats its literal meaning, like smeagairle róin literally means seal snot, but is a jellyfish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tineke79400

thank you very much for this information, it makes my day


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nathelbiya

If this is always wolf, how would you say 'son of the country ' then ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1452

Literally, "Is mac na tíre é" - "he is a son of the country", though "Is mac de chuid an Tír é" would give a better sense that he belongs to the specific Country.

"mac tíre" might be better translated as "a country son", without a definite article, but the implication is that the wolf is not found in towns/cities, but in the country.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjkuecker1965

I completely couldn't figure this one out. :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jackmchugh12

would i be correct to say 'páirc' can also be used for field?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Gort seems to be used mainly for fields under cultivation, but páirc doesn’t seem to have that restricted meaning; so it seems like páirc could be used for gort, but gort wouldn’t necessarily be usable for páirc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rjcrjc7313

is "cú allta" common for wolf

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