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  5. "Téann an t-eitleán soir go S…

"Téann an t-eitleán soir go Sasana."

Translation:The plane goes east to England.

November 29, 2014

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jackmchugh12

whats the differnece between 'oirthear' and 'soir' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

oirthear is the place, soir is when you go that direction. Like how you have suas and anuas. Think of soir as 'eastwards'. Also one for 'easterly' or 'from the east'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sheshesh

How would you say this using "north"? I did not run across "north" (away) in the lessons, or the refreshers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Téann an t-eitleán ó thuaidh go Sasana.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sheshesh

GRMA :) So, north does not hold to the same pattern as south, east, and west do? (as in: aniar, siar, thair, for example)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling
  • north: ó thuaidh ;
  • northeast: soir ó thuaidh ;
  • east: soir ;
  • southeast: soir ó dheas ;
  • south: ó dheas ;
  • southwest: siar ó dheas ;
  • west: siar ;
  • northwest: siar ó thuaidh.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sheshesh

thanks again! I am still a bit confused with this... South, east , and west all have different words for coming towards the speaker, and moving away. I did not run across the "moving away from speaker" word for north. I try to keep notes for all of the rules, but missed directions. YOUR answers ALWAYS help immensely!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

My last comment only contained directions for motion away from the speaker (i.e. “going to the …”). The analogous words for motion towards the speaker (i.e. “coming from the …”) are:

  • north: aduaidh ;
  • northeast: anoir aduaidh ;
  • east: anoir ;
  • southeast: anoir aneas ;
  • south: aneas ;
  • southwest: aniar aneas ;
  • west: aniar ;
  • northwest: aniar aduaidh.

This set is analogous to winds in English, e.g. a northwesterly wind comes from the northwest (and thus blows southeast).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emfitzgerald

Autocorrect was bad enough with only one language to worry about. For some reason it always changes "the" to "tree" as if that is so much more common of a word. Now I am getting things wrong because it changed "airplane" to "airgead."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moira_the_Dragon

The hover hints hive "east along" as one of the translations for soir. Is this an idiom used in Ireland? What does it mean, exactly?

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