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"Lo quiso."

Translation:She wanted it.

5 years ago

124 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ConaireMor
ConaireMor
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FYI: Because they have not fixed it yet, you should know that the preterit tenses of saber, querer, and conocer change meanings. Querer in preterit becomes tried (for this example, "he tried it" would be correct), saber becomes found out (not knew), and conocer becomes met (not knew, or familiar with in the context of the verb). They mean what you would expect them to mean in their past imperfect tenses. So the correct spanish to mean "he wanted it" would be "lo quería", not lo quiso.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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There are many expressions using the verb "querer" . Are you sure it loses this meaning in the pretérite? What is your source?

See many uses on the following Spanish-English dictionary website: http://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/querer

and the Spanish authoritative dictionary website:

http://lema.rae.es/drae/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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It is an interesting theory. Here is a source for querer changing its meaning in the preterit.
querer | to want (Imperfective) | to try (Perfective)
no querer | not to want to (Imperfective) | to refuse (Perfective)

Imperfective - Present tense, Imperfect tense, Progressive tenses, Future tense, Conditional tense
Perfective - Preterit tense, All perfect tenses (present perfect, past perfect, etc.)

Although I disagree that a translation for this would be he tried it. I think querer translates into try as in 'someone tried (wanted) to do something'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveHarris809825

Thanks to all for their references on this topic.

I discussed «querer» with a Canarian friend here in Gran Canaria.

After some confusion, we eventually established that the "tried" meaning above is in the sense of «probar», not «intentar».

In other words, "I tried Sam in the job for a couple of weeks before I took him on full-time"

NOT: "I tried to park the car but hit a lamp post".

If we've got this wrong, could someone clarify further?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ybytu
Ybytu
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the meaning does change, of course (from quería to quiso). however both should be translated as “he wanted”. the thing is that for most of the actual situations in which one would say “he wanted”, one probably means “quería”. since a desire is most often something “ongoing”, a mental “state of being”. and then “quiso” is used in very particular cases. it means that he wanted it “at that time” (his desire is being considered as a simple and complete whole with a definite extension) and I think this means most likely that we’re speaking of a choice. something like “I offered him a cake and he didn’t want it.” (because in this case we’re talking about the way he related to that definite event (my offering). and this relation is only relevant at the time of that event.)

(source: native Portuguese speaker, we have the same thing.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k1bb5

That is very good insight.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ignatznkrazy
ignatznkrazy
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The "meaning change" is something that is almost universally taught to English speakers, but is in large part a myth. This article has really improved my grasp on preterite versus imperfect: http://www.cervantesvirtual.com/servlet/sirveobras/35761630101354941976613/p0000004.htm#22

Key bit is here:

While it is not harmful to state that saber in the preterite is often expressed in English as «found out», etc., it is crucial to stress that these verbs are not unlike «normal» verbs when used in the preterite. In each case, the preterite of «meaning-change» verbs focuses on the beginning or the end of the action or state just as it does with «normal» verbs (Principles 2a and 2b). However, the contention that «some verbs take on a special meaning in the preterite» is misleading because it suggests that the changes in meaning always occur. In reality, they do not apply in all contexts.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drmorts

I see .. thanks that makes sense ...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcounts
dcounts
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Interesting. Gracias.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coldtoes

If you do a peek on "quiso," it says "he/she/it/you wanted" but when I put "You wanted it" for the translation it says "You" is wrong. Is "you" wrong here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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No, and you should report it. I had the same problem answering You loved him and got it wrong, but when I corrected it to She loved him it was marked correct. I've reported mine as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tammy1351
tammy1351
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i said" i wanted it" and was marked wrong d.l. says" it wanted it" was correct????

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ignatznkrazy
ignatznkrazy
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"I wanted it" is wrong. That would be "Lo quise." This is the pretérito, so the endings are different from present tense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TMTommy
TMTommy
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The answer "I wanted it" was marked wrong, and one of the correct answers listed was "It wanted it." The next time, I answered with the awkward "It wanted it", and THAT was marked wrong, suggesting "I wanted it as a correct solution. What gives? Reported.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyanaARI

I'm not sure if this was a mistake on Duolingo's part, but if not... Lo quiso ~ He/She/It/Usted wanted it Lo quise ~ I wanted it Just oooooone itty bitty vowel to memorize. God bless. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

Yes, you are right. A single letter changes everything. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fiendfiend

Just goes to show the importance of context. "He loved her" vs. "She wanted it..."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cunningwigeon

Can someone please explain to me why the quiso does not have the accent over the o? In the conjugation chart the o has an accent.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyanaARI

Querer is an irregular verb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesRodri20

How do I know it's SHE and not HE here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

There's no way to know. DL should accept both, so report it if it doesn't.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloy361680

Still not fixed, for me at least, and its not in the report options.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kimalie

The second English suggestion for quiso in the drop down menu is Clara(it/him). Can someone explain that to me? I do not know this English verb Clara. Kinda thought it was only a name.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pinguino.diablo

I think it must be a mistake. Clara is not an English word, as far as I know, only a name (the dictionary agrees). I've reported it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukecomer

IT IS SPANISH, PEOPLE

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukecomer

NOT ENGLISH: THEY ARE DIFFERENT LANGUAGES

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hokiedave5000

It is only a name here in the US where I am from. I found that odd as well, especially since it is capitalized thus implying it's a name.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Interesting observation, Kimalie. In fact, after writing a reply to you, I realized that I had somewhat hijacked this discussion thread for a topic that was really kind of going off on a tangent from most of the inquiries that were surfacing for "Lo quiso," so I decided to break it off and give it a separate post of its own. You'll find it here:

Clara is so much more than just a name …

along with additional information about this topic than what the original post had.

For those who take the time to read it, I hope you enjoy it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AssItch

Why would you wanted him not work?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyanaARI

Well, it would, because it would be "usted", but with Duolingo if they use usted they normally put it in the sentence. Like "Usted lo queso." Does that make sense? Because the 3rd person singular (he, she, it, and usted) can be any of those, sometimes the noun or pronoun is named in the sentence for clarification. Especially with usted, because people most of the time use tú, depending on the country.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becca.
becca.
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I believe 'you wanted him' would be 'le quiso'. Am I right in thinking 'lo -' is only for objects?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Le is for indirect objects. "Le leí un libro." which means "I read him a book."
The indirect object is the word that answers read to whom? The direct object answers read what? Le can mean him, it or the singular formal form of you. Lo is for direct objects. "Lo quiso." which means 3rd person singular form (He, she, it, or the singular formal of you is understood to be the subject) wanted or loved him, it or the singular formal of you (masculine).

Here is a website about indirect object pronouns: http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/iopro1.htm

about direct object pronouns:
http://studyspanish.com/lessons/dopro1.htm

and about what to do if you have both:
http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/iodopro.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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I've noticed that DL does not like to translate quedar as want when referring to people, which is probably the issue here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamaicarose2
jamaicarose2
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Quedar (to be left) us not the root verb in question here. It is querer (to want)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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I found wazzie's statement

DL does not like to translate quedar as want when referring to people, ...

a bit perplexing, but initially, I upvoted wazzie's post because I just figured "quedar" may have more meanings than what I had initially learned. After taking a closer look into it, however, I cannot find any examples of it being used to mean "want." Is there something more to know about "quedar?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdbarber

I think that probably was just a typo by wazzie. I' m sure he meant to say querer

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Yes, that is true. "You loved him." , "He loved you.", "He wanted it.", "She loved him.", "She loved you.", "You wanted it.", or "She wanted it." are the most likely to be accepted.

This website explains direct object pronouns.:

http://studyspanish.com/lessons/dopro1.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Henley

It would not accept "You wanted it.".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyanaARI

No, 'lo' 'la' 'los' 'las' 'me' and 'te' are for DIRECT objects. Por ejemplo(for example), I give her(Direct Object) to them(Inderect Object).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itay_bi
itay_bi
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"He loved her/him" is also correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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It should be. Whoops, not " He loved her." that would have been "La quiso." "Lo" can stand for him, it, and you (singular formal) as the direct object. The subject can be he, she, it, or you (singular formal). Technically, "He loved him." should be accepted, and "You loved you." , but you would probably want to clarify those with a noun on one, either the subject or the direct object. See above for some websites that explain direct object pronouns.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NathanNobl

the hints are still showing "I wanted it". In what way can "lo quiso" be translated into a first person phrase? The only conjugation I can find for "quiso" refers to other people. Maybe a native speaker can help.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alley.kasn

This is confusing me as well.

"Lo vi" was translated as "I saw it". "Lo quiso" was translated as "she wanted it" on DL but as "I wanted" on Google.

Would appreciate some clarification!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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Google translate is 100% wrong on this one.
Quiso is the third person singular preterit form of querer.
Lo is a direct object pronoun which can be translated to it or him.
Lo quiso = He/She/It wanted it or He/She/It loved him. (Querer is a bit strange in that it generally translates to 'want' with objects and 'love' with people).

http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/querer

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dluzer
dluzer
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These comments are a lot more tame than I was expecting lol

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jbauer1414

couldn't it be "she wanted him?" or even "he wanted him?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nickelelr
nickelelr
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Yeah, although if it refers to a person I think it would be more "she loved him" or "he loved him"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sueprising
sueprising
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why not "you loved it", (formal you conjugated the same as third person he or she)? that should be accepted ~no?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lunzie
lunzie
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I said you wanted it. DL said, it wanted it. ??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottsimons

I wrote "she wanted it".... Got marked wrong, it said "translation: she wanted it"..... That's EXACTLY what I wrote! WTF??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zchbaniel25
Zchbaniel25
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What could be the reason that it is o here instead of ó ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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The verb "querer" is irregular. Check out the conjugations for "querer" and many other irregular verbs for pretérite in the following link:

http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/100046/preterit-simple-past

A full Spanish dictionary with conjugations for every verb (enter verb name and press conjugar button when definition appears):

http://lema.rae.es/drae/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zchbaniel25
Zchbaniel25
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Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

I put that website: http://lema.rae.es/drae/ into a couple of sites that translate sites i.e. Google, Bing etc and that really helped me. I'm not at the level yet where I can translate Spanish websites. http://translate.google.com

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

several preterite forms with odd stems have no accent

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesRodri20

If 'Lo quiso' actually implies that 'it she wanted' why isn't 'Lo siento' then 'it she sorry'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

Quiso is past tense for "he/she/it wants". Siento is present tense for "I feel". Lo siento, therefore, means, literally, "I feel it", as a way of saying "I feel for you". Lo quiso, therefore, is a way of saying "he/she/it wanted it". Hope this helps!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ep_nl
ep_nl
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Why has 'quiso' no accent?

In the Tips & Notes all examples are with accent.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Your post caught my attention, ep_nl, because I would find it surprising if duolingo placed an accent on the "o" in "quiso," so, I reviewed the Tips & Notes section for the "Past" branch of the tree. I believe you are referring to the fact that for regular verbs, third person singular verbs have an accent on the last letter of the ending. For a visual, see the following:

To access the full page of these Tips & Notes, visit:

Past

As for the conjugation of "querer," if you go to your Words tab

and click on "querer" (or any of its conjugated forms), you can access the conjugation for it. It will look like this:

If you need more explicit instructions than this, let me know so that I can try to help you further.

Just so you know, you can do this for any verb that is part of your duolingo Word list.

Hope that was helpful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Moley0603
Moley0603
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Most helpful. Thank you. 2 Lingots given.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alvares_21

could somebody please explain to me the difference between "Lo quiso" and "Lo quise"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpope66

It took me a while to understand what was happening there too. "Lo quiso" is "It wanted it" and "Lo quise" is "I wanted it". This is confusing to me because most of the conjugations for "I" end in "o" and so it seemed backwards to me. Also it is past tense so that changes things and often the past tense forms of verbs end in "o" also. I'm sure someone could give you a much more intelligent answer but that's what I had to learn for myself.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alvares_21

Thank you very much, your answer was perfect

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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2 forms of this irregular verb, querer PRESENTE: quiero, quieres, quiere, queremos, queréis, quieren. PRETÉRITO: quise, quisiste, quiso, quisimos, quisisteis, quisieron

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielLugg
DanielLugg
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It wanted it? I put "I wanted it" and apparently it was incorrect!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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You are confusing present tense and past tense. Look at this conjugation table

The preterit first person singular is: quise
The preterit third person singular is: quiso

As hpope66 said in response to alvares_21, it is very easy to get in the habit of seeing an 'o' ending and thinking first person. But that isn't true for the preterit. In the preterit, third person ends in 'o' and fist person ends in 'i' or 'e'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AveryHD

Can't this also mean "he wanted him" "she wanted him"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Yes, it can.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ronniebrasco

How do you know it was he wanted it, and not i wanted it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpope66

"I wanted it" would be Lo quise. It's confusing because when you get to the past tense the rules about verb conjugation flip around a little. You just get used to conjugating the "yo" form with an "O" on the end and then you get to past tense and the "yo" form ends in "E" or "A". Confusing as all get out right? :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kispanish

So how exactly do I know if it's "she" here.....I thought "lo" =it Please explain

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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lo can also mean him. It is a masculine direct object pronoun. la is the feminine direct object pronoun.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Possible translations of "quiso":

  1. he wanted
  2. she wanted
  3. you wanted (singular, formal)

Possible translations of "lo":

  1. it
  2. him
  3. you (singular, formal)

Therefore, "Lo quiso," can mean any of the following:

  1. He wanted it. / He wanted him. / He wanted you.
  2. She wanted it. / She wanted him. / She wanted you.
  3. You wanted it. / You wanted him.

Bear in mind that "querer" can also be translated as "to love," adding on to the number of ways, "Lo quiso," could be translated. I haven't tested them all out, but I would assume that duolingo accepts all valid translations. If anyone finds otherwise, please report it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PacoPeters1

Why not "He wanted it?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

Yes, "He wanted it" is correct and it's one of the accepted answers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenAlford

God I am so lost here, even reading the comments below. Why 'she' wanted it and not 'he' wanted it??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

Both are correct. :)

She wanted it = (Ella) lo quiso.

He wanted it = (Él) lo quiso.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenAlford

Thanks, I thought so - but it only said 'correct' for 'she'. Thanks a lot :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

De nada. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertWill40

How do you know if it's he wanted it or she wanted it or it wanted it or I wanted it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

Context. :)

And "I wanted it" would be "Lo quise", not "Lo quiso". ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Estupendo1

translation for "she wanted it" should be"lo queria". doesn't "lo quiso" mean "I wanted to".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

She wanted it = Lo quiso / Lo quería

I wanted to = (Yo) quise / quería.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lmulrich

Why isn't it "la quiso" if it is "she wanted it" instead of "lo quiso"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyanaARI

"Lo" and "la" are both direct object pronouns, with one being masculine and the other being feminine. The "lo" is the object that she wanted. Ella quiso la camiseta. (She wanted the t-shirt.) Ella la quiso. (She wanted it.) La quiso. (She wanted it.) Since we're not told what she wanted, the "lo" is used. It takes some getting used to, the object pronouns going before the verbs, but with some practice you'll get it in no time. :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/george455805

I wanted it?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

I wanted it = Lo quise / Lo quería

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alicia2017

I translated it as . " He wanted it ." and it was marked wrong. Why?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

"He wanted it" and "She wanted it" are the main accepted answers, so you may have typed something wrong without noticing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drmorts

why is it she wanted , could it be She wanted or it wanted and what would be I wanted 'yo quiso" or just quiso ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drmorts

could it be he wanted it , or it wanted it ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

She wanted = (Ella) quiso.

She wanted it = (Ella) lo quiso.

He wanted = (Él) quiso.

He wanted it = (Él) lo quiso.

It wanted = Quiso.

It wanted = Lo quiso.

But:

I wanted = (Yo) quise.

I wanted it = (Yo) lo quise.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drmorts

Thanks, The answer given for lo quiso is she wanted it . I didn't try it wanted it or he wanted it .. so I guess all would be correct. how do you know the difference .

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

Yes, all of them are accepted. You need the context to know the difference.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drmorts

ok thank you

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie532061

It wanted it?? Makes not sense

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BabyChoBaby

They should fix it because the first time, it said "I wanted it", then "It wanted it" and now it says "She wanted it".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobbieJenn

"it wanted it" does not make sense in English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zanepalino

It said "it wanted it" is that right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wizza10

It wanted it??? What does IT relate to? A robot....

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaLinda970897

Please i dont understand this one

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Miguel280968

I'm not too involved with the following 'fine points' of the language. But was just wondering why the answer given to me was 'feminine' I thought when gender is not known it's assumed to be masculine ? ie "lo quiso" = she wanted it yes it, she, he wanted it would seem a better answer else lo quiso = he wanted it....O K i must seem chauvinistic, but it's not my intention! R t F L (Ries te Fuerte Loco) my spanish version of LOL

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeanne277986

Lo quiso, please repair it

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joshua214481

You guys are way over my head, but i think maybe you like to hear yourselves talk...enamored with the sound of your words

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IrisDurfee

My "correction said "it wanted it"......weird.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gregory146754

How does lo become her?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spaniel77
spaniel77
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Im confused already and need to practise this so much

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2Wz1xJR2
2Wz1xJR2
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..said the rapist

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/susannafulcher

Why is lo quise i wanted it and lo quiso she wanted it?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/susannafulcher

Brat

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marpessa01
Marpessa01
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you cannot translated " lo quiso"in "she want it". I am just learning Spanish but i know very well English. Lo quiso means" i want it". Unless i am wrong

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ignatznkrazy
ignatznkrazy
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You are wrong.

http://dle.rae.es/?id=UnvXEIb

Pretérito perfecto simple

yo quise

tú / vos quisiste

usted quiso

él, ella quiso

nosotros, nosotras quisimos

vosotros, vosotras quisisteis

ustedes quisieron

ellos, ellas quisieron

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveThoma938220

How do i know from Lo quiso that a 'woman' wanted it? What part of the statement tells me the gender? Is it in the Lo, or Quiso? Please help!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nunie19

The answer cannot be 'It wanted it' as I keep getting I have reported it 1 march 2018

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KalkedanMekonen

How is that "It wanted it," it makes sense if it was "it wanted or it loved."

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CARLOSDANG130097

quiero el queso que queria

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PegWhitman
PegWhitman
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Why she wanted...he/she/you. I said he wanted it.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris913144

How an earth is that, "She", when there are no feminine words in the sentence

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ron.seymour

Ron Seymour: I got pretty brassed off with this! For everyone out there LO quiso = HE wanted it.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SPanya4
SPanya4
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Lo quiso = "It wanted it."
'I wanted it' was not accepted

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/atoopan

there is not any she in the sentence

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ladderdog
ladderdog
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You loved it. Por qué no

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaguarWhisperer

Ok. I have a really bad brain. That looks really wrong. "She wanted it" wtf

1 year ago