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"Puede pasar cualquier cosa."

Translation:Anything can happen.

5 years ago

67 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/M.Uijttewaal
M.Uijttewaal
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you can pass anything?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lechuza-chouette
Lechuza-chouette
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Me too. I wondered what the context could be.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Maybe my littlest grand-daughter's habit of eating cherry pits & plum stones.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rainie69

cute

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hithisistrey

"Puede" could mean "Ud. puede" and in that case the phrase would mean something more along the lines of "you can have access to/use whatever".

I picture a host saying this to a new guest.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Pasar is used quite often for something happening. I don't think too many people look to the street when someone says. Qué pasa.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
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Exactamente

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lavmarx
Lavmarx
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"Anything can pass" can also be a translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewsSuzy
AndrewsSuzy
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except that "anything can happen" is much more natural. "Pass" sounds 'foreign' or 'stilted' to my English ear!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lavmarx
Lavmarx
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"Pass" as in to move or go into or through a particular place.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewsSuzy
AndrewsSuzy
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But I think you'd need a preposition - e.g. "anything can pass through that" or "anything can pass by that". Otherwise still sounds stilted. Mind you, I hear English speakers from some parts of the world saying "my father passed" which has the same meaning as "he passed away"....where are you from?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaRoark

For me it sounds more like "pass" as in go by, or anything can happen, kind of like time can "pass"

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Em44
Em44
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me too

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nimrod117

why is it "Puede pasar cualquier cosa." an not "cualquier cosa puede pasar"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/acethunder21

Just imagine that it's Yoda speaking.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cara.altman

Good advice you give.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glukkon
glukkon
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This is exactly what I keep reminding myself to do. haha :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lavmarx
Lavmarx
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Actually not, they are both correct and each as natural as the other.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seelian
seelian
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so are you mean >>> cualquier cosa puede pasar is accept answer too?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lavmarx
Lavmarx
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Absolutely, if it isn't accepted you should report it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Un otro ejemplo: Aceptamos licencias de cualquier estado. (We accept licenses from any state.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/howardqiao

same question please

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattnag
mattnag
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Spanish is more flexible in its construction of sentences than English is. Usually the subject comes before the verb in Spanish, but it is also acceptable for it to come after the verb.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MotherBatch

How would you say: it can pass anything?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lworley214

I agree with you. The first thing I thought was "He can pass anything", meaning more like "He can get by with anything". How would one write either of these differently so that it is different that his "Anything can happen", which means something completely different?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DannyMcKil
DannyMcKil
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This question has been raise a couple of times and I can't see an answer - I am told He can pass anything is wrong. While I can easily see why Anything can happen is OK, I would like to know how you would say this or it can pass anything. It could be quite handy if I go into smuggling!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sanmiguel82

Without other context, why is "he can pass anything" wrong, perhaps he was in a fast car or sitting on the toilet after eating a bag full of rusty spanners. :-) :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/junevilleco

Thank you jfgordy and jindr004; I have book marked the page!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelOrr

Puzzling why the apparent subject is at the end of the sentence. ??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angel194462

Why can't it be "It can happen to anything"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nadia.makara

Either one works. There are several articles and works of literature that utilize both phrases to mean the same thing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcoPolloAqui

I put; It can go through anything. Denied! All i could come up with was thinking about a knife commercial.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gardenhoser
Gardenhoser
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How do you say, "He can pass anything"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inckwise

I would like to know how we are supposed to know this isn't "She can pass anything?" (i.e. a brainiac passing tests?) This one threw me off. How would I have caught this???

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daisytuck

Why not "It can go through anything"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/farkydoodle

I've read over the comments here and I need clarification. Some commenters think the word order could be reversed, but someone said the "correct" answer is an idiom (or an expression, at least) in Spanish, so the word order is important and not to be changed. Do we have a definitive answer yet?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewsSuzy
AndrewsSuzy
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just wondering if you ever say "cualquiera cosa"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inckwise

I read comments posted but still don't see how I would know right away not to interpret "He/She/You can pass...". I just don't see how I'd know to start with "anything" as the subject?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-Liano-
-Liano-
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"He can pass anything" was marked wrong on Feb 20th 2016. Maybe it's awkward sounding in Spanish but I was thinking of a person that does well on tests. Isn't that a possible translation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gordonjackson1

Sentence structure and use of "pasar" confuse me. I wrote, "you can pass anything"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/br0d4
br0d4
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What is wrong with "Anything may happen"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I wish more people would remember that "puede" can also be translated as either "may" or "is able to."

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan_Ciser

It seems backwards to English speakers but the translation is, "Anything can happen."

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes. The ability to both omit subject pronouns but also to routinely put the verb before the subject in statements is a one two punch for many English speakers. This one I got easily, but I still get tripped up by it from time to time.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FigTwig
FigTwig
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I tried "Anything is possible" but that was rejected.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenaBaldwin
DenaBaldwin
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How would one say, "You can get through anything" ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doug.weino

Can happen anything -spanish yoda

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_Elizabeth

Hmmmm. Well I wrote "he can pass through any thing." THAT was marked wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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Is "anything can happen thursday" again?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.j.banks

This sentence is funky.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Something else can happen. (Can "cualquier cosa" mean something else"? )

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alex388293

like in NBA Finals

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brandon34353

Useful phrase.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaslark

Why not, "You can take anything." ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gz7g6b

That sentence is so twisted around from English. I just don't get it.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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It takes a long time to get used to the fact the subject often follows the verb in Spanish sentences. This is especially true because sometimes the subject of the sentence is a subject pronoun which is omitted. But after a while you just learn to switch it around in your head. Cualquier cosa puede pasar. That is a perfectly valid construction as well. But these are the ones that you need more experience with to understand. A native speaker will use sentences like this quite routinely. But after you get tripped up a few times your brain will turn it around. It just takes time and exposure.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rubescube

Brovo A. J.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vinca23

"Anything MAY happen" marked as incorrect :O

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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May is a difficult distinction between Spanish and English, but concensus would say that Anything may happen would use the conditional. Podria pasar cualquier cosa. The conditional represents possibilities and is generally translated as could or may.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marihaley
marihaley
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I got it but only because those were the only logical choices. I realize it is much easier for the "program" to grade our responses by us choosing from a limited number of words, but it turns it into a guessing game rather than calling upon her memory and skills.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria990458

Anybody else singing Ellie Goulding? doo doo doo dooooooo

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tycampbell19

Couldn't you say "se puede cualquier cosa"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I think that that might be idiomatically OK. But in terms of grammar, Anything can happen is not strictly speaking a passive sentence. The verb to happen in both languages does seem to have a passive sense, but it is always intransitive. So with or without the modal verb poder, it has no active voice with a direct object that can become the subject of the Spanish sentence. So within the confines of a language program teaching basic to intermediate Spanish, it is wrong. But se puede seems to have become a cultural concept in hispanic culture, so, as I say, I wouldn't be surprised if you wouldn't hear native speakers phrase it as you did, although I am not sure.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Could you put "cualquier cosa" before the verb? "Cualquier cosa puede pasar?"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes. It is never incorrect, to my knowledge, to put the subject before the verb in Spanish. But there are many times when they just don't. I think it is as much a matter of personal style as anything else. I may be wrong, but it seems to me that Spanish speakers will often put the important part that they want to emphasize at the end of the sentence, while we tend to put it at the beginning.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greenraccoon30

What is the "pasar" for in this sentence?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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In addition to meaning pass, pasar means to happen. Hence the Qué pasa which became common among Americans. It means What's happening

1 month ago