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"Los animales tienen miedo del fuego."

Translation:Animals are afraid of fire.

5 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/pedrotaylor

my answer 'frightened of fire' your answer ' scared of fire' why is mine wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Not every correct answer is in Duo's database as a 'correct' answer. Just cuz Duo does not accept an answer does not make it wrong. But you still lose a heart. Learning from a computer program has drawbacks.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/defpub
defpub
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make sure to submit "My answer should be accepted." when this legitimately happens!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pedrotaylor

touche (sorry i do not have an accent on my keyboard)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

In English, wouldn't one say: frightened by fire? This is a real question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Yes, and it could be said many other ways and mean different things. The literal translation is "The animals have fear of fire" and that is proper English referring to specific animals. "The animals are frightened of the fire" might be specific animals and a specific fire. "Animals are frightened of fire" is a general statement. But I would use "frightened by" for something more specific. For example, "The animals stampeded because they were frightened by the fire".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crrrivers

How about the general statement: "Animals fear fire."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Sure. If it's good (even if you have a doubt) yet isn't accepted, report it while you're in the problem.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christophe2068

It's not incorrect, and any English speaker would understand you. It just sounds a little awkward to native English speakers.

It is more common to say "They are afraid OF fire," or "They are scared OF fire." Otherwise we would likely say, "They are frightened BY fire." It's similar to the way certain Spanish verbs are always followed by "a" and others by "de."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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I timidly put in the articles. That worked. Now I see it accepts the translation without any. Some progress must have been made.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

Would the Spanish sentence with "de fuego" instead of "del fuego" also be considered correct? (Any elaboration to understand the general principle would be appreciated.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/suejones

Why was tiene miedo used with "a" in some sentences and "de" in others?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Use a for action: "tengo miedo a hablar la palabra", but I think even native speakers switch these.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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This sentence has 4 different translations, each seemingly acceptable: the animals are afraid of the fire; the animals are afraid of fire; animals are afraid of the fire; animals are afraid of fire. Each of these sentences has a slightly different meaning, but is there really no way of differentiating them in Spanish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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I can't. Articles are used more in Spanish because announcing the gender helps clarify the phrase. If we don't use one in English, it suggests we're speaking in general. That's done to a lesser degree in Spanish, but it's subtle. All I can do is try to duplicate a phrase the same way I heard it before. Since I don't remember very well, tengo un acento fatal.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sabio_mucho
sabio_mucho
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In common English a straight-forward translation, "Animals have a fear of fire." would mean the same.

1 week ago