"La granjera"

Translation:The farmer

July 8, 2013

62 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruthlilycat

Somone who is a Spanish speaker - please tell me this - isn't the J sound also an H sound? I always learned that J = H - ie granhera, here the speaker says granchera.

November 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caiser

J sound is strong. Goto this page: http://www.acapela-group.com/text-to-speech-interactive-demo.html

Choose Spanish and copy this text: Javier es un granjero con un jaco cojo, Tiene una caja roja de madera de boj.

They sound of that TTS is pretty good.

November 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruthlilycat

Ok I did that, and the "j" sound for American Spanish is much softer and more of an H sound. But the "j" sounds for Spain Spanish were stronger,& much more of the same type of sound as what is being presented here.

November 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruthlilycat

What do you think of this? This is more how I know the j sound http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-kNt6ztiXA

November 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caiser

She is Mexican and her J sound is similar to our from Spain, similar to H sound in english but more stronger

November 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/okiol

If I understood a lesson I was given, j is commonly pronounced as an h, but it is a sound that is a little further towards your lips, still very close to the throat though. Between ch and h, I guess you could say. Not sure, anyone can comment on this?

April 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AppelBougher

That's a nicer way to explain it than I was going for, lol...

September 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruthlilycat

This too, I think there might be regional accents for J - Cuba/Spain - strong J to a "ch" sound but Mexico it's much softer?

Also look at this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSzbu1kjnAI

November 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caiser

This one is made by a English speaker and some words are made a bit soft. I don't think that we have many differences between countries in j pronuntiation

November 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AppelBougher

This is just me, but it seems like, in Spanish, the "J=H" sound is almost guttural, like your trying to, well, get mucus out of your throat... ONLY MUCH NICER AND PRETTIER! I actually love that sound... But I'm not a native Spanish speaker, so you can do whatever with this. But this (to me) seems to be why the "J=H" sound sounds almost like an airy "CH"... Sorry for the disgusting visual...

September 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/THeNeeno

It is not as soft a sound as the English 'h'. It's more like the German 'ch', not the English 'ch'. It will vary slightly by speaker, but usually a speaker who pronounces it like the softer English 'h' sound is not a native (Spanish as their first language) speaker.

Some regions soften it slightly, but native speakers never lighten it all the way into the very smooth English 'h' sound. It's not the same sound. It's just what English speaking people learn because it's the closest sound they are used to pronouncing.

July 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcley93

It sounds like the throaty "ch", as in the exclamation "ech" (when one tastes something nasty), as well as the the Scottish word "loch" (as in Loch Nes) or the Jewish name "Chaim".

November 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salsaverde

difference between "granjera" and campesino in South America, in terms of when one would be used and not the other?

November 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itwing

In Spain we use " el campesino" for someone who works the land, and "el granjero" for someone who cares a farm, including animals.

January 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

"La granjera" is a female farmer, and I have seen it said that this word used to mean, "farmer's wife."

March 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nokkenbuer

I suppose that could be the case, but I'm more inclined to think that it means a female farmer, unless the context indicates otherwise. The idea of it meaning a farmer's wife is likely a vestige of the old gender-based occupation expectations, since farming was traditionally considered "a man's job". Now with such gender expectations largely abolished, perhaps the meaning of "la granjera" as farmer's wife is largely traditional and only really used in older texts.

I am far from being a native Spanish speaker, though, and my understanding of Spanish culture isn't superb, so I could be wrong. Are there any more knowledgeable or native Spanish speakers who could either confirm or correct my conjecture?

March 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

One can’t guess about something like this. Mne, I simply reported what I had seen. This is one of those issues where one needs to be informed by a native. However, different areas may differ. But also there is the situation where a farmer's wife would also be a female farmer.

March 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nokkenbuer

Perhaps you're right. If "la granjera" is used to mean both "the (female) farmer" and "the farmer's wife", however, then I suppose both should be accepted, even if the latter may not be used as frequently anymore.

March 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

The way Duo works is by mainly just using one or very few English translations which is enough to provide a basic understanding of what a Spanish word means. That's the only thing that is important, not all the different ways something can be said in English. For example for "dura"" DL applies the English word "hard" whereas there are over a dozen different English words which apply. Knowing these is up to our own effort. DL is not in the impossible business of making beginning students to become professional translators. We all need to go with the few words Duo provides while learning the rest on our own. But the discussions are a good place to share what other English words are. But just because they exist does not mean DL should add them to the database eliminate DL's simplicity.

March 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gemobis

In the little song "Three blind mice...' they all ran after the farmer's wife.

May 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoJo1438

why is Rancher wrong. Internet translation shows "rancher" also, and the word granjera sounds more like Ranger.

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beantorrent

I thought the same, but there is a more closely related English word "granger" which means farmer or homesteader. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/granger And if this helps "Medieval Latin or Vulgar Latin granica 'barn or shed for keeping grain,' from Latin granum 'grain,'"

February 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amormi

Thank you. This will help me better remember this word!

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nokkenbuer

The phonetic similarity of two words are only helpful for mnemonic devices and when the two words are etymologically related. The similarity in pronunciation that one term has to another, especially between languages, is a poor predictor or indicator of their similar meanings and roots.

A rancher, technically, is a type of countryman who owns a large area for breeding and/or raising animals, especially cattle. Ranchers do not always farm or grow crops, so a farmer would not adequately describe their occupation (although "animal farmer" may be an adequate description of a rancher). Though they are similar, it would be incorrect to describe an agricultural farmer as a rancher if he or she does not raise or breed animals.

"Farmer" would the more accurate translation of "granjero", since a "rancher" is one who farms animals and not crops (or fish, as an aquacultural farmer), and I believe granjero refers to the occupation of farming in general, without any specification of what is being farmed.

Anyway, "ranch" and "rancher" come directly from Spanish: "rancho" and "ranchero", respectively. It would be best to use "ranchero" (or "granjero(-a) de animales") to describe a rancher, rather than simply "granjero". An agricultural farmer would be "agricultor" and an aquacultural farmer would be a "piscicultor".

March 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AppelBougher

This word is SO pretty. I love Spanish!

September 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abintra

Is 'granjera' a regionalism?

July 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iakobski

It's not clear from here, but this is one of those words that can be both masculine and feminine, so "la granjera" can only be used for a female farmer, a male farmer would be el granjero.

November 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ranchers1

You just answered the question I came back here for.This ability to check out sentence discussions is outstanding. Thanks everybody for your help! Or as they say in the southern states of the USA "Thanks for the help y'all!"

January 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nokkenbuer

From my searches, "el granjero" would be a male farmer. I don't think the term is genderless.

March 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caiser

No

July 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smallquanni

why granger incorrect?

July 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dormouse

Because "granger" is an incredibly uncommon word in English. I had to Google it to be 100% sure it actually meant farmer.

July 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gaby14lee

farmer is also campesino

December 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cyani01

Granjera did not come up in the original lesson for me. I could not understand what she was saying. It sounded to me like "Grancara" which goes against the "h" sound for the "j" as others above have said.

March 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Toria54

I had the same problem - just guessing at a possible word that might go with her pronuciation. After listening to it several times, all I could come up with was La granquiera!

March 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loulou909

The speech isn't very clear here, I had to slow it down because to me it sounded like "la naranjera"

June 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shrikrishna1

Why the female farmer is wrong? When l'la gata' is translated as a female cat!

August 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/giraffeturtle

Would gardener work as well? In my Spanish class I learned "granjera" was "gardener"

October 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itwing

No, "gardener" is jardinero/jardinera, the person who cares a ornamental garden. Granjero/granjera works the land to obtein food.

January 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ELLAEAbram

Darnit that "r" and "h" gets me everytime. I always hear the "r" as two syllables instead of one. For ex. I heard "ga-dan", and the "j" up against that "n" sounded like "keh-da." Altogether it sounded like "gadankeda". <sigh> I have to do better at my listening. Hopefully I'll catch it next time.

October 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.-J.

the word for farmer is granjero - granjera mean's farmer's wife. I don't know why the feminine forms of some of these words are being used, for occupations that are masculine. I've never heard of a female farmer. Also, I've never heard of a cat being referred to as 'gata', unless it is definitely known that the cat is a female.

February 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itwing

Granjera is not the farmer's wife. Granjera is a woman who works in a farm, and her husband can have another occupation. Why do you say that a farmer is a masculine occupation? You are learning a idiom that differences the genre of the nouns, so you have to open your mind to it.

February 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caiser

Granjera can be both of them, the farmer's wife or a farm's worker. Most of time you can't use femenine to name the wife but there are a few occupations you can use the femenine when you are talking about the wife, for example alcaldesa is used to name the mayor's wife.

February 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.-J.

Caiser : Ok, that's good to know. By the way, according to my dictionary, other translations for granjero are husbandman, granger, and cattle-rancher. A small farmer is a labriego. I guess my main point is that Duolingo should not have marked my answer wrong, since granjera can be a farmer's wife.

February 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JayDub1984

Is if me or is the pronunciation of this robo chick muy mal y terrible!!

March 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.-J.

She is a real person, and sometimes her pronunciation is incorrect. I think she is the one who says 'jo' instead of 'yo'.

March 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nokkenbuer

Duolingo really should be saying "El granjero" to teach us the generic term, since masculine gender always applies when the gender is not known. "La granjera" is "The (female) farmer" despite how there is no context to use to determine the gender. This in turn may confuse some learners, who might assume "granjera" is one of those genderless exceptions.

March 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RossJoe

I hear her saying granchera. She definitely pronounces the "j" as "ch" Am I crazy or do others hear her say "ch"?

May 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheAwesomeClair

...... grows crops, raises cows, and collects eggs

May 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baileysykes.

I put the ganja...lol jk

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nanakofi3

I have never heard the word granjera before

June 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/almot09

Ranchero is very common word in Mexico, should be accepted as possible translation.

July 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brendon.cant

if the farmer was male does that change it to "el granjero" ?

April 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pauiel

the rancher is wrong

May 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/halfyou

The farmess! Language is stupid! I have no idea what I'm typing!

June 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christian.920

Is there a difference between "granjero" and "agriculturo"?

December 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.-J.

No, not that I can find, but the correct word is 'agricultor'. The word for woman farmer (if there is such a thing) is 'agricultora'.

December 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielrentel

second time in a row I got this... I dunno why...

January 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.-J.

The Duolingo people really love that word.

January 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shanaalicia

I have learned other words for' farmer', never this one...how many Spanish terms are there??

January 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.-J.

There are about nine different words that can be used, including agricultor, but Duolingo is stuck on granjero and granjera.

January 15, 2017
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