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"Can you repeat that again?"

Translation:¿Puede repetir eso de nuevo?

5 years ago

106 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AveryAl

Why de nuevo rather than nuevamente?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bespokeenglish

You can also say 'otra vez' instead of 'de nuevo' as DL (and the rest of Spain) approve!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boricua022708

So what is the difference between "otra vez" and "de nuevo"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Literally, "otra vez" means "another time." "De nuevo" means "again" or "once again," which is more or less the same meaning as "otra vez." There's not much difference. I spoke a little it of Spanish as a child, but only knew "otra vez," and only learned "de nuevo" since starting Duolingo.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Yep, you're right, there's only a subtle difference. A good way to highlight it is to focus on "otra / another" versus "nuevo / new":

Otra vez - again - another time.

De nuevo - again - anew.

So "otra vez" just means to do something another time - a repeat action. While "de nuevo" means to do something anew - from the beginning.

Or, in other words, "otra vez" is to do something again, whereas "de nuevo" is to do something all over again.

Either is fine in this sentence, but for those concerned with the redundancy of "again", "de nuevo" is possibly a better choice due to this nuance.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AngusH
AngusH
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Is it possible to say: Eso puedes repetir de nuevo? i.e. bring the "eso" to the beginning of the sentence

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

No, it isn't. It sounds really odd. You can say "¿Puedes repetir de nuevo eso?" or "¿Puedes repetir eso de nuevo?".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Hi Royraju. I think the Direct Object place-holders that precede verbs in Spanish confuse some English speakers, especially when "it/he/she" etc. require one, but "that/this/those" etc. do not. Just to clarify: "[Verb] that"="[Verb] eso" but "[Verb] it"="lo [Verb]" correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

Yes, it's correct. For example, "Write it" = "Escríbelo"; "Write that" = "Escribe eso"; "Write this" = "Escribe esto".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Why is the right verb above given as "puede" instead of puedes?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
hud214
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The formal: "¿Puede (usted) repetirlo?" as opposed to the informal "¿Puedes (tù) repetirlo?".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/George_Gibson_77

Either would be correct. I used puedes and it was accepted by Duolingo.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spiderloft

why is "Puedes tú repetir eso de nuevo?" wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babsblabs
babsblabs
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It is not wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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In Spanish, you would normally drop the tú because it's not necessary. Nor is it required or common to use inversion for questions. However, if you put tú before puedes, they should accept that.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hesolomon

Is something wrong with "Puede usted repetir eso de nuevo?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

No, it isn't. También está bien.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lroshell

I put the same thing but it got marked wrong. It said that i used the command form of "puede" insted of the "tú" form of "puedes". I don't understand why. What am I supposed to say if I'm talking to someone thats older than me?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nanucdiana

Report it! I did

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olso2119

Doesnt the usted need to go before Puede in this example?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babsblabs
babsblabs
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Puede usted repetir eso otra vez should be accepted. I merely added the word usted which is fine.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

report it

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Whiz1116

Is "Puedes repetir eso una vez más" also OK?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

I thought so, but it was marked wrong!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrsDeMonner

I think it certainly should be. Make sure you report it!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidOken

I am confused as to when to use "eso" and when to use "ese". I'm sure this is a simple thing, can someone help me out?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babsblabs
babsblabs
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Eso (that) is the neuter demonstrative pronoun used to sum up the whole idea (of what you want repeated, in this case). Ese (with accent on first e) is the masculine demonstrative pronoun meaning "that one" when it is a masculine person or thing. Ex. No me gusta este libro; quiero leer ese (with accent). I don't like this book; I want to read that one.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidOken

Thank you!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babsblabs
babsblabs
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You are welcome. And thank you! I needed to clarify my own thoughts on this to answer your question succinctly. It is explained in more detail in 1001 Pitfalls in Spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kparcell

Ese is an adjective: that book/ese libro; Eso is a noun: repeat that/repetir eso.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MistyLa

"Can you repeat that again" is poor English. Repeat means to say or do something again so the inclusion of again in this sentence is redundant. "Can you do it again again?" Ugh! It hurts my ears. It is, however, a common grammatical error among native English speakers.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.tastic
m.tastic
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"Gobbledygook." "Can you repeat that?" "Gobbledygook." "Can you repeat that again?" "Gobbledygook."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BartMilner

No it is not a grammatical error, it is a way of creating emphasis - a "pleonasm" according to the same discussion elsewhere. "I can't hear it, myself. (But you can). " is another example. It is not a redundancy: "myself" emphasises the "I" just as the "again" emphasises "repeat". Not unusual in English and (I'm learning) very common in Spanish. Also works in m.tastic's example.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
hud214
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A pleonasm.....huh. LIke a double negative! Well, you learn something new everyday!! Thank youi.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BartMilner

It was new to me too, someone used it in a discussion where so many people got upset about "repeat again" that DL locked the discussion. I had to google it. It can mean a 'fault of style' apparently (but not a fault of grammar) as in "black darkness".

I suspect I may spend too long in the discussion pages because it is less like hard work than endlessly repeating DL's Spanish phrases in order to try and memorize them... :-§ I also suspect that I am not the only one...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Sometimes I really tire of it all and want sentences and stories that have history or facts in them that also I want to remember...maybe sentences from history, science, etc.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Ah....But it might fit the situation if someone has repeated something once already and you still need to hear it again?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamsrow

When do I Nuevo and when do I Nuevamente? Clueless.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wcat84
wcat84
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I'd also like to know this

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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I've read that de nuevo is much more common usage.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eroisman

What is wrong with "Lo puedes repetir de nuevo?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hesolomon

"Lo" means "it," not "that."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edmond.Ballerin

Puede Ud. Is not wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chelkey1

What's wrong with being polite and asking "podrías"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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That is "could", not "can".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

IMO, chelkey1 meant that it is more polite to use "could" than "can." By saying "could," you emphasize that you are asking not only directly if "someone has the ability" but also asking implicitly if "someone has the inclination."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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You are 100% correct, but I think Alexis's point is that DL is asking for a translation of "can" not "could" therefore "podrías" is incorrect.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Too right! I was digressing. ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CronasDeSe

Can we also say ¿Puedes lo repetir eso de nuevo?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Yours is saying, "Can you repeat it that again?".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Incidentally, in the reverse course many native Spanish speakers think "Can you repeat that?" translates to "¿Puedes repetirlo?" From this and other examples it seems "it" and "that" are not as distinctly differentiated in Spanish as they are in English (with good reason when you think about it).

Another point worth noting is that in some regions/dialects it is common to use a redundant DO pronoun and a DO (but not another DO pronoun) to add emphasis.

Regardless, you are 100% right Tessbee, doubling the DO pronouns is incorrect.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Thanks for mentioning this, Jellonz! Yes! I did notice in the reverse course how many native speakers don't put much distinction between "that" and "it" for objects, and that fact had me wondering!

P.S.
Ha! I didn't even realize I was responding to a two-year old post! (I was using the app at the time.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peterbrady616

do you always use de in front of nuevo to mean again?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kai_Guy

I think it's a set phrase. Without the de, it just means new. However, I can be, and often am, wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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Is there a reason why "nuevamente" was marked as incorrect?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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Nuevamente is formal, and not commonly used. I don't see why it would be marked incorrect, unless for that reason alone.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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Ah, no sabía eso. Gracias por la información. ;) I think I reported it. At least now I know de nuevo is more commonly used. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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No hay de qué. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Thanks for the colloquialism! Lingot to you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lng52-._
Lng52-._
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How about the use of "esa"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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I believe "eso" is used instead of "esa" because it isn't referring to anything specific, so there's no gender. I might be incorrect, though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RainSwallow

Could this also be translated: "¿Puede volver a repetir eso?" I'm not sure about the verb conjugations, but I thought "volver a + infinitive" could also be used for "to do (verb) again."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/P1GG1EP0W3R

I thought when addressing "tu", you used "-as" (puedes). Then, the sentence would be: ¿Puedes repetir eso de nuevo? All this time! So if I wanted to ask, "Can you sing? It would be "Puede cantar?" Correcto?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/P1GG1EP0W3R

I thought when addressing "tu", you used "-as" (puedes). Then, the sentence would be: ¿Puedes repetir eso de nuevo? All this time! So if I wanted to ask, "Can you sing? It would be "Puede cantar?" Correcto?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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"Poder" is conjugated to the subject, but with English "You" is very broad and can have up to four different translations in Spanish: Formal singular; Familiar singular; Formal plural; Familiar plural. The translation of your "Can you sing?" depends on which "you" is being addressed (and where):

Formal singular you: ¿Puede cantar?

Familiar singular you: ¿Puedes cantar?

Formal and familiar plural you (Latin American Spanish): ¿Pueden cantar?

Formal plural you (Peninsula Spanish): ¿Pueden cantar?

Familiar plural you (Peninsula Spanish): ¿Podéis cantar?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TriciaMuir

'Can you repeat that' does not require 'again' at the end of the sentence. Think about it!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eikreutz

Why not be able to say "puede usted repetir""

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kai_Guy

While I'm sure that would be understood, it's not grammatically proper. I think repetir requires an object, repetir algo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adrianbyrd123

Lo puede repetir de nuevo marked wrong help please

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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"lo" means "it," but in this case "that" is used, so you would need to use "eso."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarlosDGuevara
CarlosDGuevara
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You NEVER EVER say "Can you repeat that again?" It's redundant and wrong.

You should say "Can you repeat that?" or "Can you say that again?".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Unless, of course, it has been repeated already :) http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/rerepeat

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfalfa2

Such an absolute statement, and so wrong. It is quite commonly said, even if redundant. Redundancy is often used in English and other languages to add emphasis, or simply because it has a consistent pattern with "doing anything" again.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I agree with alfalfa2 that absolute statements should generally be avoided. In your defense, however, I assumed that what you were getting at was that repetitiveness is often inelegant (for example, "Repeat that again") and sometimes misleading (think of double negatives). At best, redundancy adds the emphasis sometimes needed during a conversation. At worst, redundancy detracts from coherence by bringing in an unintended non sequitur that interrupts a sentence's flow. Either way, the reader/listener may "disconnect" from the message because he or she was distracted by the lack of clarity caused by the repetitiveness.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
hud214
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again is redundant. "can you repeat" implies again by itself.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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Actually, it's not redundant. I've seen a lot of people say this, though. The reason why it isn't is because let's just say you misheard something, so you ask the person to repeat it. If you mishear it a second time, you ask them to repeat it again, to repeat it another time. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
hud214
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"Can you repeat that again?" is said the first time you ask for repetition. It's redundant not unlike "¡A Usted le digo!" I tell you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dragonscale333

I tried "Puedes repetirlo de nuevo" and it was marked incorrect. I know it's too early for direct object pronouns, but would that work?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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"repetirlo" doesn't work because it's saying that, which would be "eso," not "lo." :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dragonscale333

Ah, thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andalsothetrees

Puedes repetirlo otra vez, why is it wrong?!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dragonscale333

You're missing a word for "that" - eso, or esa. "Repetirlo" means "repeat it".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anabelaneves

The translation of This is Eso and the translation of That is Aquello. Am I wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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Yes, you are actually incorrect. "eso" means "that," whereas "esto" means "this." "aquello" also means that, but it's more like "that ____ over there." "aquello" is used to express objects that are further away, and "eso" is used for objects that are closer. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Holly263690

Why is it puede and not puedes?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Puede for formal second person - Puedes for informal second person - Pueden for plural second person. All should be accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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"puede" refers to the singular formal form of "you," which uses the pronoun "usted."

  • Usted puede (singular formal)
  • Tú puedes (singular informal)
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kristina821524
Kristina821524
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I did not choose the puede option because I thought formal you ALWAYS required the word Usted to be used with it; that is what all of my Spanish teachers always taught, including a native speaker. Is this not a general rule?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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Do you mean to ask if it's required to use the pronoun with the verb? If so, I don't believe so, considering the default translation of "Can you repeat that again?" is "¿Puede repetir eso de nuevo?" without the pronoun. In context you'll likely know who you're talking about or to, so using the pronoun isn't really necessary. It can certainly be used to remove any ambiguity, though. I personally often like to use the pronoun when using verbs that can apply to él, ella and usted — such as "puede" — since it just feels odd not using them because of the ambiguity it might create, but that's probably a matter of preference. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kristina821524
Kristina821524
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I knew that in general you could leave the pronouns out, and like you I prefer to stick them in when it is ambiguous. I just thought that it was required to use it with Usted. Thank you for the response. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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I haven't personally heard of that rule, so I would be inclined to say that it's possible it does exist if it weren't for the fact that the default translation omits the pronoun. Since it does, I'd like to guess it doesn't matter too much either way. ^_^

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VladTepesX

"Puedes repetirlo de nuevo" is what I said. Apparently that was wrong. Is it a case of "it" vs "that"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Yep.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

Ironically, this is the second time I've had to translate this sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmchc

I did not finiish typing. This is happening way too often!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gmsmg
gmsmg
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Why is it necessary to include the peposition de in this sentence?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PrettyUmbreon120

it is annoying

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raven.long

Why puede instead of puedes?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raven.long

Ah, never mind - I see someone already answered that...

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/craig558435

Answer changes every time

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicholasha380828

it didn't accept 'puedes...' As so often a perfectly acceptible answer is not accepted!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HaileySeo

Is it de nuevo or de nueve?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babsblabs
babsblabs
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de nuevo; nueve means nine.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Warao1
Warao1
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Repita por favor is also good

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/91914

puede refers to the third person. puedes is used when talking to a second person, i.e. You, so puede repetir eso de nuevo translates as Can He, not can you!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babsblabs
babsblabs
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Puede (usted) - formal you, singular = Can you? Puedes (tú) - informal you, singular = Can you? Pueden (ustedes) - you, plural = Can you?

All three above = Can you? depending on the "you" to whom you are speaking.

1 year ago