"È il pane di ieri."

Translation:It is yesterday's bread.

July 9, 2013

61 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flex567

"It is the yesterday's bread" ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benyscott

Get rid of "the" and you got it :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aserebrenik

Why should one get rid of "the"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 3177

Because we don't use definite articles in possessive constructions in English. We say X's Y, not "the X's Y".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/another-dave

Well we could (e.g. "the king's head") — I would've thought it's that we don't use it with time generally (today/yesterday/Monday/March).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 3177

Right. I could have given my comment more thought.

What I should have said was that we only include "the" if the noun phrase itself takes "the" prior to taking the possessive. We don't use "the" just because it's a possessive phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BernhardMa1

Not with relative time, but aren't there constructs like "the Sunday news", "the April issue" (of the magazine), "the 2022 Winter Olympics", "18th century fashion", "80s / eighties music"? None of those sound right to my (non-native-speaker) ears with possessives either. Only when using last/next/yesterday's/tomorrow's/… time, you use possessives.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sujitkulkarni

FYI: raffermo, stantio = old,stale


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PurpleMontart

Should it not be written "d'ieri"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blarkin0818

It is because "ieri' is actually pronounced with a consonant "y" sound and not a vowel "i" sound like in "d'Italiano"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamdunk

I thought that but squashed my instinct & got the answer wrong. At least I won't forget this now!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jls332

this seems quite literal. Day old bread is something we would actually say in English whereas yesterday's bread is not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benyscott

Of course it is literal, Duolingo isn't here for you to learn how to say "Day old bread" in Italian, but to TEACH you italian. They ask you a literal translation because they want to check if you understand the structure of the sentence.

Even more importantly this sentence is in "Time" skills, so they are trying to teach you how to say "Yesterday" not that the bread is a day old.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EnchantedApril

Sometimes DL allows a more idiomatic translation. In order to translate it as "day old bread" one must still understand the meaning of "ieri."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/renata941696

But I am learned from your answer how to say day old bread.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duolessio

I know it's an exception, but you can leave out the article in Italian too, in this case:è pane di ieri is fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 3177

Do you have a source for that information?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duolessio

I'm a native Italian speaker and that sounds totally fine to me. I found this link (in Italian):

http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/partitivo_(Enciclopedia_dell'Italiano)/

Paragraph 3. Articolo zero: it says that you can omit the partitive article when the noun is after the verb. So you can say "è pane di ieri" but not "pane è di ieri". In that case you need the article: "il pane è di ieri".

Now, I know that "il" is not a partitive article, that would be "del". So if you say "è pane di ieri" you are grammatically closer to "è del pane di ieri", but the difference in meaning is so little that they are used interchangeably.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 3177

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duolessio

Prego, di nulla! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steinor

if its "di ieri" shouldn't it mean "its the bread of yestarday", and not the bread "from"yesterday??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blarkin0818

In this case, "di" is indicating possession. This is why when you say "il libro di Maria", it means "Maria's book", not "the book of Maria". Hope this helps: http://italian.about.com/library/fare/blfare157a.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cegev

"of" in this form can also indicate possession in English, however; "bread of yesterday" and "yesterday's bread" can have the same meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Telisa7

As blarkin0818 says, it indicates possession. But having said that, it would be very uncommon in English (at least in the central US, where I live) to have someone say something "of" yesterday rather than using "from".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maluferrari

I wrote "it is THE yesterday's bread" and duolingo marked as wrong, why? il=the


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aykut123

As "il" refers to bread, you must say "the bread of yesterday" or "yesterday's bread".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chris.stan2

Yesterday's bread was marked wrong. "It's yesterday's bread". Don't see the difference


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RJasonT

You left out the verb making this a noun and an adjective not a sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maluferrari

well the article "the" in English refers to bread also, not to yesterday...you would never say "the" yesterday in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jesslc

Because "it is the yesterday's bread" is not good English.

Italian often uses the definite article (il/la/lo/etc) in situations where English would leave it out. Part of learning a second language is learning these kind of differences and recognising that you often can't just translate completely literally if you want to speak good English or Italian. Yes, I realise that makes it harder to learn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 3177

Exactly. Different language, different rules. If different languages were the same with just different words, we wouldn't need lessons, just dictionaries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew694784

Where I come from we'd say "It's day-old bread."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marti_MG

this is a significant part of Italian culture (when living there), and among books of Enzo Bianchi: "Il pane di ieri" https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enzo_Bianchi intervista: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNrZVytlKl4

"pappa col pomodoro" is a famous Tuscany dish usually made for children, using yesterday's bread. look for the recipe 100's online.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZ5Zwrcvvaw

Finally, in French it is "le pain d'hier" (contracted de + hier)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sid996012

The right translation is: Is the bread from yesterday?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marti_MG

many Italian recipes ask not only for "day-old", but so-called "home-made" (can be store bought!) bread in Italy, which is crusty and chewy with big holes, (perfect for catching sauce when wiping up remaining sauce on your plate: ‘facendo la scarpetta‘, as said in Italian).

"Home-made", though, is variously called 'pane casereccio" or "pane di casa" or (especially in, but also around Naples) pane cafone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HappyBeaver

I'm not English native, so I'm not sure: is it an idiom? (the phrase "it is yesterday's bread")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SallyBrown1

No. English speakers call it "day-old bread."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pete531015

I am English from UK and I have often said 'that looks like yesterday's bread.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marti_MG

Who is famous for having said "yesterday's news is tomorrow's fish n chip paper"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.monkeybread.

Italian native speakers, can you actually say this about bread? Like "do you have fresh bread?" "No, only the one from yesterday" in this context or smth?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dogtore

"bread of yesterday" was marked wrong. Why? I am not a native speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 3177

We just don't say "It is bread of yesterday" in English. But we can say:

  • It is yesterday's bread.
  • It is bread from yesterday.
  • It is the bread from yesterday.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dogtore

Thanks a lot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna837381

There is an "X" and the color is red as if there is a mistake but the message says that the answer is correct. This has happened for most of the exercise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaethegay

Why was "its yesterday's bread" marked wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marti_MG

Jaethegay in English "it is" = it's with an apostrophe, you wrote "its yesterday's bread", which is the possessive form.

Rae.FMOD (moderator) wrote:
We just don't say "It is bread of yesterday" in English. But we can say:

It is yesterday's bread.
It is bread from yesterday.
It is the bread from yesterday.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna837381

I live in the middle of the U.S. Here we have the phrase, " it's day old bread," and there are stores that sell "day old bread." Anna


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marti_MG

È il pane di ieri. "di ieri" = from yesterday; same meaning as "day old", but the target language is Duo's cue in translating.

Now, i think it's an example of someone speaking to another (maybe in the kitchen preparing something or in response to someone's complaint, like "[what did you expect/not surprising] È il pane di ieri.")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karen154653

Should have accepted loaf it is in the prompt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marti_MG

it would seem so, but all meanings on the prompt-list don't fit every context. Was your full sentence: "It is yesterday's loaf" ? Personally, I try to pick the most natural solution, just to learn the basics without being too creative. I suppose here i would continue to choose "bread" and probably never "loaf"-- or were you just curious to see?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesRey2

Isn't the literal meaning "it is bread from yesterday" and isn't that just as correct as the idiomatic translation 'yesterday's bread?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thimblefox

Is this an expression?

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