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"He does be with your mother."

Translation:Bíonn sé le do mháthair.

3 years ago

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rentriki
rentriki
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"He does be with your mother"? This is a very awkward English sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It's (if I understand correctly) an old Hiberno-English construction for the habitualness. Sorta like African American Vernacular English's habitual 'be'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathsft

It's common among Irish dialects of English and serves as a translation of "bíonn". Standard English doesn't make the distinction.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/segviolation
segviolation
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Standard English does make the distinction by saying "he is normally/usually/frequently with your mom" for habitual.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

They add more information to the sentence than is provided by the habitual in Irish or 'does be' in Hiberno-English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lordy.byro
lordy.byro
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Yes, but that makes it easier to parse while still bringing the point across. The "does be" construction looks positively odd to most English speakers and does not really facilitate a better understanding.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlmogL
AlmogL
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I suppose it facilitates a better understanding to someone who speaks the dialect.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lithobolia
lithobolia
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Yes, if I'm understanding this verb correctly, it's a habitual "to be", which is just implied. There shouldn't be a "does" in that sentence in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grainnenim
grainnenim
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True, but it's a very common way of saying it in Ireland and it (I've heard) may be a bit of a hangover from when everyone spoke Irish :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahCrofton

Burn

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Breandan2014
Breandan2014
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It is what you would say in Belfast :" He be's with his mother every day." " He be's there every morning". The teachers tried to beat it out of us in school but they failed.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talbotmews
Talbotmews
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When do you use le and not leis for with

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobGreene4
RobGreene4
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"leis" means "with him" but it is also used when you want to say "with the", which is "leis an".

So if you want to say "with the mother" you say "leis an máthair", but to say "with my mother" (not definite article!) you say "le mo mháthair".

Hope that helps!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arrikis1

It seems to me that in an irish for English speakers lesson the translation should be what is normally said by people that speak English as a first language--not as English spoken by irish speaking people. Otherwise it's not really a translation of irish into English. And we end up with sentences that make no sense in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CormacMOB

If you're learning the English translation of Irish, then maybe. But this is closer to how Irish is used, so it seems to me better for learning Irish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris346815

A big part of learning Irish is learning how to think in Irish. As you progress, it will be less awkward for you.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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English as spoken by Irish people is English.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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Many of the learners are Irish and speak English this way natively; most Irish people don't actually know much Irish!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HappyEvilSlosh
HappyEvilSlosh
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Can someone explain what idea is trying to be expressed here? Cos I have no clue.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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I took it as “He is habitually with your mother” — perhaps he’s the mother’s Man Friday.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobGreene4
RobGreene4
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And Saturday and Sunday as well. ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TFG
TFG
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I'm assuming he visits the mother frequently

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kate_Fishman

When would this be used in Irish as opposed to "Tá sé le do mháthair"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Bíonn is used rather than when a present habitual meaning needs to be expressed.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rostellan
Rostellan
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I think most people get the fact that the guy tends to spend time with his mother. However, in order to cater for people who speak standard English, perhaps setting the phrase in context would help. Like, 'He is with his mother on Tuesdays'; 'He is with his mother during the summer '; He is with his mother when he takes driving lessons, etc. In these cases Bíonn would be appropriate.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The “does be” choice was made by the course creators early on. Use the Report a Problem button to ensure that your suggestion will be read by them; otherwise, they’ll only learn about it if they happen to read this discussion.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zee-money

He is with your mother.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deserttitan

Am I correct in presuming that 'bíonn' is only used with 'le/leis' sentences?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

No. bíonn expresses habitualness, and can be used with other sentences.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina462140
Nina462140
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I notice the only thing anyone in these lessons "do be" is "with your mom."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rostellan
Rostellan
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Yes, but does anyone actually say 'He does be...' these days? It used to be a fairly common construction in parts of rural Ireland when I was young. I doubt if it is used much now.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobGreene4
RobGreene4
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Yep, in Dublin it does be said quite a bit.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CormacMOB

Very common in wicklow and wexford.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vkigus
vkigus
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Sorry, but what's wrong with Bíonn sé le bhur máthair?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexinIreland
alexinIreland
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Absolutely nothing! I checked and Bíonn sé le bhur máthair. is already included as an alternative translation for this sentence, so I'm not sure why your answer was not accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
ZuMako8_Momo
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In another sense, "I often run" was "Bím ag rith". Why isn't this similarly "Bíonn sé ag tá..."?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TreasaWilson

I accept that this is Hiberno-english, but it conveys literally nothing to me. What would be the translation in standard English, or isn't there an exact equivalent?

4 months ago