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"Kattene har forskellige farver."

Translation:The cats have got different colors.

December 1, 2014

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AleksicNikola

Hvornår burger jeg ''anderledes'' og hvornår ''forskellig'' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zlreitz

I think that anderledes means different as in "not normal", while forskellig is used for a difference between two things. But I'm not sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trevro

I think "forskellig" is more similar to "various".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duKaren

Can this sentence be translated 'The cats are different colours'? 'Have' or 'have got different colours' sounds very odd in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thor.dk

Yuo are on the right track, zlreitz! Another (en anderledes) way of seperation the two words (exampel): "Bikes and cars are different (=forskellige) means of transportation. In a collection of blue T-shirts they almost all have a breast pocket, but two T-shirts are 'anderledes', because they dont have a breast pocket." Bikes and cars are 'forskellige', T-❤❤❤❤❤ are T-shirts, but not all look the same, some are 'anderledes'. 'Forskellig' is also often used as in the following exampel: "The gardener grows many different (=forskellige) plants and he loves it. His neighbour is 'anderledes', he only loves to grow wheat. Also his wife is 'anderledes': She is a heavyweight boxer and loves to knock-out her competitors" So you see, 'forskellig' bears the meaning of 1) a different kind 2) various (objects), while 'anderledes' bears the meaning of the same kind, but not with the the normal or expected look, smell, use ... etc. In 67% of the sentenses where DL uses the word 'anderledes' I myself would say 'forskellig'. Yes it's tricky, but don't vorry too much about it - the Danes will understand you no matter which of the two words you use. (I'm a native Danish speaker)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristensenAdam

Not sure that "have got" is proper grammar. Sounds wrong to my ear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac_Luna_

I imagine it's more common in England to say "have got" than in the US.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheInfiniteFish

I can confirm that it is very common in England. In fact I'd say that, in my experience and region, "I've got" is used much more than "I have", which sounds a bit formal to my ear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charlie-Thistle

Totally, "I have" sounds formal and a bit archaic - something I'd hear from older generations but not from anyone under 40. Probably differs in different areas, but "I've got" is the norm around here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve903235

Nevertheless, "have" should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KurtAnders7

color is American spelling, colour is the English spelling

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