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  5. "Der Rock ist nicht groß."

"Der Rock ist nicht groß."

Translation:The skirt is not big.

July 9, 2013

72 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duccit

Robo voice's R sounds like an H


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p

Try to avoid thinking that German sounds can be expressed exactly in terms of English sounds. Learn from a German on YouTube how to make the correct sounds directly!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnbax10

exactly! i thought it was Hoch then it marked me wrong!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

It couldn't be Hoch. Hoch is not a noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RotBohnen

Seriously! I thought it was hoch or porc :-/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dlehrke

It's definitely an 'H' sound.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slitkx

It sounds as H to me too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

I can't confirm this. It sounds absolutely fine to me.

http://www.pauljoycegerman.co.uk/pronounce/consonr.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/solidgitarius

Like in Brazilian Portuguese!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trinthetweety

Honestly I was torn between a C and H, trying to figure out what the heck it was trying to say. It is kind of hard to decipher-- but I think that comes with learning it through the internet, where you can't read lips.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

Are you hard of hearing? (The reading lips)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gzeebzee

I believe the word Rock originated from the Frankish word 'Hroc' and is probably of the same origin as English Frock which explains both the Hr. sound and why Rock can both mean Skirt and mens Frock coat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5etemadi

Can someone help me with the word order ? Why isn't it "Der Rock ist groß nicht " ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Prosopon

The word "nicht" is placed in front of the word it is refering to. Was ist der Rock nicht? Groß! Der Rock ist nicht groß.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acquiesce213

Nicht is often used before an adjective or adverb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AylaMarkkula

So confusing, 'cause "rock" in Swedish is a bit of a dated word for a coat for men, so of course I accidentally chose that first. Whoops. And bathrobe = badrock, for example. XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It's a bit of a dated word for a coat for men in German, too :) Especially in the combination Gehrock. (If you do an image search for that, you'll find a number of longish overcoats, often dated-looking i.e. in an older style.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas328056

Would the most typical translation for this be, "The dress is not too long"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregTaillon

Would this be similar in intention to "die Rock ist nicht lang", or is it just strictly overall size that the statement concerns itself with?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chucklenuts7

I think it's pretty much like it is in English. "The skirt isn't big" and "The skirt isn't long". What do you think the difference is in English? Could "That skirt isn't big" mean that the skirt isn't long? We're talking about intention here, so I guess "long" could be one of the things "big" could mean. By the way, der Rock, rather than die.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karu539496

Why is it der not die (or das)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because the word Rock is masculine, it's der Rock.

die is used for feminine nouns such as die Katze (the cat), and das for neuter nouns such as das Pferd (the horse).

The gender of nouns is largely arbitrary and simply has to be learned.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aeggman

It didn't like my use of "large" rather than "big", but shouldn't either work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MustafaWay1

I thought groß was tall also ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LateBlt

Yes, for people, it means tall, but for other things, it means big.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sjawadiwar

Example of the second: Ludwig van Beethoven's Große Fuge (the Great/Large Fugue). It does not mean tall here. It's all about context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mch_kharkov

and maybe also 'adult' or 'old' (like in 'Großvater', 'Großeltern')?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NourHomsi

I would go more with this translation ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p

Don't get too stuck on it - it really does depend on context. "The mountain is tall": Der Berg ist hoch. "The ladder is tall": Die Leiter ist lang. Of course there's a bit of overlap too. But in any context, it doesn't usually make sense for a skirt to be "tall".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dmartinyoung

Duolingo exercises are rife with phrases that don't usually make sense, so one can seldom know what translation they are going for. A butterfly writes a book. The rock reads a newspaper. Why wouldn't a skirt be tall?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/K9Rjhoppe

Why is, "Rock" masculine? The only things that looks like a masculine skirt is a kilt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

What does that have to do with it? All nouns have grammatical gender, which has no relation to biological sex. And a skirt is just a piece of fabric, having no biological sex anyway. Who wears it is irrelevant.


[deactivated user]

    Why is "Mädchen" neuter and not feminine? For the most part, there is no logic when it comes to the gender of German nouns. That's just the way the language is.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    For the most part, there is no logic when it comes to the gender of German nouns.

    Exactly!

    Though in this case, there is a bit of logic: Mädchen is a diminutive formed with the suffix -chen; such words are always grammatically neuter regardless of the gender of the base word.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xyval

    this skirt is as heavy as ein rock!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gzeebzee

    Ist das ein Minirock? Möglicheweise? Get this: In German Minirock = Mini Skirt (obvoiusly) but there is also Midrock - knee length and also Maxirock , but if thats not enough skirt there is also Hosenrock = Culottes (which english must loan a word for) Now if you like the style of a skirt very tight around the knee, thats a Hobblerock = "make you hobble skirt!"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gaynor516252

    Sounds like hoch not rock.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waddle12324

    Why isn't it ' Der Rock ist groß nicht' ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Because nicht groß has to be in that word order.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waddle12324

    Why isn't it ' Der Rock ist groß nicht'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Because when the predicate that you are negating is an adjective such as groß, the nicht comes before the adjective: Der Rock ist nicht groß.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZDoctorZero

    Why isn't it the skirt is not long or tall?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimSilverman

    Why not "The skirt is not large"??? If clothing is too large, people in Germany say "zu Groß".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Why not "The skirt is not large"?

    "The skirt is not large" is also an accepted translation.

    But "The dress is not large" is not.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UncleStu1

    Why is skirt masculine in German?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p

    That's just how it developed linguistically. There's no reason, unfortunately for us learners.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/j0hngalt

    Why is large not acceptable you stole my chance of completing this lesson because I can't pay for it. Horrible job there dou


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexisMann19

    The Rock is not impressed with this sentence.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DexX

    Is it just me, or does the audio sound like "brock" or "block" in this one? I've reported it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cbjj

    Sounds OK too me (for a robovoice).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

    Yep, it sounds fine to me as well.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MementoM

    I think it sounds fine?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinGrant

    I think the fast one sound like an 'h' and the slow one sounds like a 'b'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuhasG

    I heard something similar. I thought it was 'Buch' for a guess. Sad!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RifqiHermawan

    When i said the skirt is great its wrong


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p

    In this context groß means "big" or "large".

    Saying "The skirt is great" would be interpreted differently (like "The skirt is very good"), so it's not a good translation here.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AggelikiAg2

    Is groß used in clothes'labels to denote the size large too?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    In my experience, clothes sizes usually use numbers, or they use English-based abbreviations such as "XS, S, M, L, XL".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p

    Clothing labels in Germany usually use numbered sizes or the English-based system of "XS/S/M/L/XL", but perhaps some use words too.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baba_polyglot

    sounds like "Der Hock ist nicht koss"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p

    Please read the first comment thread for some discussion about the pronunciation and what you can do to improve your understanding.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatarinaUh1

    "Der rock" sounds like "der brock"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BroganZ

    Darn. Dress and skirt are interchangable in my mind. Guess I don't think about clothes that much...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Connor_WolfieCub

    why is skirt "rock" exactly? is there some history behind it or something?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabian227203

    Its the same in Romanian, so I'm guessing it originates from Latin


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sjawadiwar

    But German does not originate from Latin...maybe it is a loanword or a word influenced by some Romance (Latin-derived) language. Or it could be related to "frock"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LateBlt

    Latin has been an enormous influence on every European language, even the ones which are not "Romance" languages and thus not directly descended from Latin. It's true that German probably had a greater tendency to preserve the proto-Germanic etymology of their words than English, but many German words which are standard today originate from Latin roots.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob_Kline

    In which part of Germany do they pronounce "Rock" as if it were "Hoch"? (It doesn't help that the slow pronunciation doesn't match the at tempo version.)

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