Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

Future tense: phrasal vs the other kind?

In a sentence discussion thread, someone said that "voy a cocinar" has a different meaning from "cocinaré." This wasn't the actual verb used, but basically, their point was one means "I am going to cook" and the other means "I will cook." Thus, there are two different connotations and it makes sense that Duo would accept one but not the other at times.

I've learned the future tense multiple times over my spotty Spanish career, and I have never heard this. In Googling for explanations, I didn't find enough evidence to convince me that this is really the case. But maybe I'm not picking up on some linguistic detail.

Yes, "cocinaré" can also indicate uncertainty, but overall I have been told that "voy a cocinar" and "cocinaré" are basically interchangeable. My current teacher has even said that this can be an indicator of educational background: those (in Mexico) who are more educated are more likely to say "cocinaré."

Can someone help me sort this out?

3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/WackyJack

Interesting... I do not have any insight into the issue, but it sure is far easier to use the "ir" + infinitive configuration.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

I have been taught that they are basically interchangeable and that the phrasal form is becoming more common. My teachers, in Argentina and Mexico, said I could use the phrasal form for the future and not fret about the 'true' future tense. But I think one needs to recognize it when reading or listening, and I think (based on my experience in Mexico) that older and/or more educated people tend to use the true future more than (to use my teacher's phrase) "the people in the street." ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9

That's interesting. I've always just used the phrasal tense and gotten by no problem (most of my teachers were Chicano or Mexicano). I felt (self) pressure to learn the other one. I can certainly recognize it, but felt I was missing out by not using it. Now, I'm quite happy. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mandyturtle

I'm not a native speaker nor am I fluent yet but in my experience the phrasal future (ir + a + infinitive) is used more often than the future tense. I also think of the phrasal as being the near future & the future tense , distant/abstract future. por ejemplo: mañana voy a trabajar. el año que viene trabajaré mucho. when I speak to people, read, listen to music or watch t.v. I most often hear the phrasal tense. I'm sure as your teacher said there are regional/ educational differences. most of the natives I speak to happen to be from el Salvador.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eggplantbren

I usually just think "ir + infinitive = going to" and the 'real' future tense as 'will'. There's only one exception to this that I've seen so far. From http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/future.htm:

"But, the future tense is not used to express a willingness to do something. For this, use the verb "querer." ¿Quieres ir a la tienda? Will you go to the store?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rachvx
rachvx
  • 25
  • 7
  • 5

I, like the others, have always assumed they're interchangeable, but the other day I saw that you use "voy a cocinar" to indicate more immediate future and "cocinaré" to indicate further future. I'm kind of disregarding that for now because the former is easier, and besides, it appears to be more common. :P #unfortunately I am lazy

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wilkinsonbj

I believe, along with many of the others who have commented, that the two forms are interchangeable with respect to being properly understood, and that the difference between them is more a matter of style, formality and situation than it is of correctness or incorrectness. For instance, in English we can choose "I will..." or "I shall..." The latter would get odd looks from your friends, but it lurks in your style arsenal for any situation where it feels appropriate. Speech is music. Whether or not the speaker is aware of it, he or she chooses the notes and rhythm.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
  • 25
  • 14
  • 3
  • 2002

It seems to be about the same on the English side of it. Some people think "is going to" is more immediate future than "will" and others do not see a difference. For me there is no difference.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 999

I tend to use going to to be more emphatic - will when I'm just trying to get away from someone insisting on giving me unwanted advice that I have no intention of complying with when the person won't shut up despite attempts to change the subject - but otherwise, they're pretty interchangeable, as is the use of present tense (either is + verb + ing or simple present) with a word indicating a future event.

3 years ago